How Long Do I Study for the LSAT? | LSAT Test Prep | Blueprint LSAT

How Long Do I Study for the LSAT? | LSAT Test Prep | Blueprint LSAT


It’s a question we get all the time at
Blueprint: How much time do you really need to
study for the LSAT? We’re fully aware that there are a lot of crazy theories out there. Some say you can cram for the test in a couple weeks while others maintain that a full year of study is the way to go. You could go crazy listening to all that
stuff — so don’t. First, you can’t cram for the LSAT, so
real improvement’s gonna take more than just a couple weeks. This is because the LSAT tests you on
process, not on a body of knowledge. On the LSAT you can’t regurgitate facts
that you memorized earlier. Instead you need to develop and refine the procedures they’re testing so you can repeat these processes
efficiently and reliably on test day. Nevertheless, this skill development does
not take a full year to execute. Instead the ideal time frame is between
two and four months. If you have a light course load in
school, work part-time, or otherwise able to devote full attention to the LSAT, two
months should just about do it. If you’re working full-time or more, or you have a tough class schedule this quarter or semester, that might push it into the four-month range. In any case, your schedule should be broken down into three distinct stages. Step One: develop general skills. In
other words build a foundation for thinking about the different parts of
the test. For logical reasoning, developing a consistent system for diagramming arguments and conditional statements. For reading comprehension, developing a system to tag passages and identify their structure. For logic games developing — you guessed it — a consistent system for modeling the different types of games. Step Two: develop advanced skills
and refine techniques This means attempting tougher versions
of logical reasoning question types, identifying secondary structural
elements in reading comp, and learning advanced techniques
in logic games to increase efficiency. Only after mastering these concepts with
accuracy and comfort do you move on to Step Three: timing and performance.
Only at this point should you begin to time yourself and further refine your strategies based on how you perform under timed conditions. Depending on your schedule you can
execute this game plan in two to four months. The result is that you’ll be ready to be
at your best when test day rolls around.

1 thought on “How Long Do I Study for the LSAT? | LSAT Test Prep | Blueprint LSAT”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *