Game Map Generator – Features and workflow – Photoshop Plugin

Game Map Generator – Features and workflow – Photoshop Plugin


Every game map size is possible Choose a basic texture Set the isometric grid Add a layer to draw your shape Choose a GMG Element Change the global light Bring your shapes into the correct
isometric angle Use the “original_shape” to generate an other
GMG Element from the same shape Hold shift to select several layers Change the brushes, the brush size and opacity
for better results Click into the layers palette to set the right position
in the layer hierarchy You can hide areas by drawing
into the layer mask You can determine the icon size with
the icon size slider BTW: You can load your own icons
into the panel, too! (only from CC-2014)

Render a blueprint from a 3d model – 3ds max technical rendering – tutorial

Render a blueprint from a 3d model – 3ds max technical rendering – tutorial


Hello and welcome to another max tutorial.
In this video, I will use this 3d model, to create this blueprint-like render. Let’s get
it started! Open 3ds max, and the model you want to make
a blueprint of. Open the material editor, and change one of
the free slots, to the ink ‘n paint material. For a blueprint, we want the lighted color
to be white, and un-check the overlap and the material id, below the ink controls. Change the ink width to something thinner aswell 1.5 might be a good-starting point. Now assign the material to your object, and let’s see our first test render! To get rid of these secondary colors, change the ink levels to 1. We want to change the background color aswell. To do that, open the environment panel, and
simply change it’s color to white. Before I re-render, I will just reduce my
meshsmooth iterations to 1, just to reduce my lag. Looks better already, black outlines on white worksheet. That’s our next issue. We only got outlines, our render is missing some important lines
that would be significant to showcase our object properly Lines from different creases
on the hood, side of the car, wheels, etc. To fix this, we will have to start using the
smoothing groups. First, select one part of the car, let’s say the hood. Apply a regular
smooth to it, and set the smoothing group to 1. Once done, collapse everything that
is below the smooth modifier, including the smooth itself Remember, you don’t have to
use meshsmooth in this technique, but if you all the smoothing groups should be set,
below the mesh smoothmodifier. Now select the polygons, that are making the
crease in the object, and apply another smooth modifier to it. Make sure to add it to another
smoothing group, anything but 1. Every crease on each object has to have it’s own smoothing
group added to it. Since I am using meshsmooth, I have to turn
on the smoothing groups in the meshsmooth setting for the creases to show up. Render out again, and the lines on the hood should be visible now. Repeat the same process in the whole model, adding smoothing groups to every polygon that
creates creases on our model. To see the edges better, I will temporarily
change the paint color to a darker gray, and will set it back to white later-on. I will show part of my process now in real-time, and will speed up the video afterwards. If you think you saw enough, and understood the method, feel free to skip to the next step. You can see the difference between the geometry before and after tadding the smooth modifier. We are aiming to achieve these hard edges everywhere we want to add lines to our blueprint. Every now-and-then, do some test renders to see how things look like and to see if you are satisfied
with the parts you already covered. For this tutorials sake I wont go into too much detail
with my model, but you can make it really detailed if you got the time and patience. Lets speed up the things a little, so we can move on to the next step. If your object isn’t too complicated, you can use the autosmooth option instead of the smoothing groups. It will work too, and sometimes you can get good results this way, a lot faster. As you can see, my object is ready now. This is the time where you can start playing with the ink width, and change the ink quality to 3, so you get cleaner lines. Now let’s assume you want to render out the model from the front view. But what happens when you try to do that? The ink ‘n paint material isn’t working in orthographic views. To make it work, you have to render from either perspective, or from a camera. Perspective view isn’t suitable for this kinds of renderings, so we have to go with the other option. Place a camera in the scene. Select the camera, and in the modifier panel, enable the orthographic projection option . Render it out and you will see a perfect orthogonal view of the model now with working materials. But the quality seems poor. To change that, we will have to switch to the mental ray renderer. So open the render setup, and choose mental ray. Before you start rendering pull the image precision slider to the right side of the scale turning up the rendering quality to high but Turn off all the other options. Now press F9 to render out the image, and what you’re going to see is a clean line art of your model. Rendering times can be long at this phase, especially with a higher poly model like mine. So for any test renders before the final image, turn down the image precision to low. To set up the scene for the final render, turn on the safe frames in the camera’s viewport. If you are rendering out different views like me it might be a good idea to group your objects. Create 3 copies of it, and rotate them in the desired position. Finally adjust the camera so everything would fit into the safe frame, and make a test render On my test render I saw that the line width are a bit thicker then what I was aiming for so I changed it to 0.8. I double checked the line width with a region render. The results were satisfying. Everything else seems fine. So after changing back to very high precision, here is my final render. Thanks for watching my video! If you have any questions, suggestions, tips, whatever, just leave a comment. I will get back to you as soon as possible. Thanks for watching, bye bye!

Generating a Voxel Blueprint in ICE

Generating a Voxel Blueprint in ICE


One of the big challenges in voxel-based games is how to build smooth, curvy structures. Some guidelines exist on how to build spheres of varying size, but more complex designs require careful planning. In this tutorial, we’ll look at how to use ICE to generate a layer-by-layer plan of a voxel structure, starting from a closed mesh. To follow along, you’ll need to download the Voxelizer compound, which we’ve provided as a zip file in the description section of this video. You’ll also need a closed mesh representation of the structure you want to build. We’ll be using the default T-Rex mesh as an example. Create a new pointcloud in the scene. Set the point cloud’s parent to the same null as the mesh Open the ICE Tree Editor Select “Create>ICE Tree”. Under the Compounds menu, select Import Compound. Import the Voxelizer compound Connect it to the ICETree. Add a Get Data node. Double-click on it, and select “Explorer”. Select the polygon mesh. Connect the Value port to the Geometry input and connect the Out Name to the In Name input. In the viewport, some voxels should appear inside the mesh. Here, the voxelizer compound’s default values have been set to work with the T-rex. To see how to configure the compound to work with your own mesh, reset all its inputs to zero. Make sure you’ve also disabled the “Enable” checkbox. Set the viewport to “Shaded” mode, and enable the headlight so we can work with solid boxes instead of wireframes. To start off, set the Box Size to 1. Set the Grid Color to a light gray. Increase the number in X, Y, and Z as follows. A grid of boxes should appear under your mesh. Decrease the box size to reduce any overlaps along the X axis. Change the number in Z to close the gaps along the Z axis. Your boxes should now be evenly spaced. Set the Box Color to an opaque white. Set the Top Layer Color to transparent turquoise. Increase the Visible Layer number. Increase the number in Y to reduce the gaps along the Y axis. You may also need to adjust the Visible Layer Number to accomodate for your change in the number of boxes on the Y axis. Your model should now be completely surrounded by evenly spaced boxes. Check “Enable” to display the boxes within your model. Toggle your model’s view and render visibility. Back in the ICE Tree, add a Current Frame node. Connect its output to the “Visible Layer Number” port. The current frame will now drive the top layer’s visibility. To render top-down snapshots of each layer, add an orthographic camera into the scene. Set the viewport’s camera to Ortho. Set the camera mode to “Shaded”, and turn on the headlight. Use the ViewCube to place the camera on top of the model, and rotate it such that the model occupies the length of the frame. To reduce our voxel resolution, we’ll increase the box size, and reduce the number of boxes along the X, Y, and Z axes. When we scrub the timeline forward, the blue squares represent the boxes to place at the current level. We’ll be using the hardware renderer to render our voxel plan, so we’ll need to hide all the nulls in the view. Open the render manager. Set the pass renderer to Hardware Renderer. Set the format to jpg. and set the Pass Frames to Frame Range. Set the Pass Camera to “Ortho”. Select Hardware Renderer on the left, and set the Background Color to white. We can now render each frame of our voxel plan. Use the sequence of jpeg images in your Render_Pictures folder as your guide to know which boxes to add at each level of your structure. If you’re interested in how the voxelizer compound was built, expand it and consult its commented sections. We’ll conclude this video with a timelapse of the t-rex’s construction, accompanied by smooth jazz.

How to Make Stairs in Sketchup (without plugins)

How to Make Stairs in Sketchup (without plugins)


Hey, what is up, nation? In this session
I’m gonna be showing you how to make stairs in Sketchup. We’re gonna delete
our scale figure here, and the first thing that you want to make sure that
you understand is the floor to floor height, in whatever you’re doing.
So we’re gonna just draw a line here, maybe we’ll make it a rectangle, and make
this a group, and then we’re gonna cut this up, let’s say, let’s say, it’s a weird
amount – twelve foot two and a half. All right, so this is our floor that we’re
going between, let’s say, it’s like an overhang or something. So we want to get
from here to here and that is our…the stairs that we’re going to need. Let’s
actually bring this down a little bit, we’re just gonna do a single run, keep it
a little simple for now. In a future video I might make a more complex stairs.
So let’s take our tape measure tool and we’re gonna check, so we have nine foot
two and a half inches, and it could actually be even more weird than that, so
let’s move it down. Let’s say three thirty seconds, so how weird is it. Okay,
so this like super odd number here. What you want to do is look at your local
code, or what your township ask them what code is applicable, if this is an
actual project, obviously. And then you want to check and make sure that you’re
verifying typically a tread, is about, you know, let’s say, a foot or so we’ll just
be a little bit safe. By, let’s say, three foot wide. I do that the wrong way. Group.
Actually I want to make this a component. “Tread” – so we’ll call that. So we have our
tread here, now what you wanted to is sort of basically figure out what your
maximum riser is, that’s the vertical part of your tread. So if I take that
tread I just made and I copy all the way down, so that it’s on the surface, and
then I hit “Divide”, let’s say, 10. So I just took a guess there. I’m gonna
measure this and that’s all about 11 feet or 11 inches, sorry. And that’s way
too much, so we’re gonna undo that. Do it again. We’re gonna we’re gonna look for
somewhere around 7 inches, so I think that was 10, so let’s try divide – that’s
the backslash or the / key, 15 and let’s see what our tread height is here. So that’s
much closer to 7, let’s just add a few more. We had 15, let’s say 18. 18 treads
here. So M for move, moving it down, divide 18. So now we’re on 6 and that’s perfectly
fine as well, so now we have all of these, I can actually delete the rest of these
because I have that spacing the really the thing that I care about is just the
spacing So now I have that dimension here, if I select this, copy it there,
I choose 17, you can see if I extend this out a little bit. There we go! I have all
of my treads, they’re perfectly spaced and then if I just want to do the
same thing with the risers or because this is a component, I can actually just
draw like that. And then delete this bottom guy. So that’s the basic shape of
my treads. You know what I like to do for the
for the riser. Or not the riser, the stringer. What I like to do for that is… …is use an actual shape. So if you think
of this as being, if you need a stringer it’s got to be one piece, right. So I’m
just gonna take this off to the side really quick, there just make it a group
and rotate it. So if you make this and then take the shape, rotate Q for rotate, the arrow to lock to that axis – there you go! So if we were to lay down this stair and
we want to draw a shape here, essentially what we’re looking for with the stringer
is an actual size and that’ll help give some realism to what’s going on. So, let’s
say, our we have a two by twelve. A two by twelve is about one and a half, the
actual size of it, is about one and a half by eleven and a quarter. So we’re
just gonna choose eleven and a quarter by this size doesn’t shouldn’t really
matter all that much. Okay, so we have that size and then we can just…actually
just pull this out, and extend that down, and I think just doing the stair like
this helps me understand what’s going on. So we have the dimension here, the length
doesn’t really matter, let’s draw the shape first. So let’s just cut this guy
out, and then we can copy him down, so let’s time this by 20, that’s more than we
need. But that’s why we can just delete the extra. So we’re just gonna hit the E
for the eraser tool and then just delete all these little guys. I’m sure there’s a quicker way to do
that. You could always do something like that. And then when we get to the top
here after this tread we don’t need anything
else. So I’m just gonna come down, I want to come down here. So I’m just gonna copy
over this line, so then it gives me that purple line, the perpendicular line, and
delete the top here, and then with the bottom, oh, we have too many. Which is fine.
We just want to extend this line back. Cuz it’s flat on the bottom, right, and
your stringer has to sit on the ground. Okay, so that’s basically stringer, and
then we’re gonna take that, and we’re going to shoot at 1.5 inches because
that’s what we got. Now we have a perfect stringer. That’s gonna look really nice
when we put it in here, so I’m just gonna make a copy, actually let me make this
a component first, so stringer. And then come over to here, a Q for the rotate
tool, I’m just gonna line everything up. Right, green, so there we go with that. And
then I can just copy this over. Now what happens here, is that you can see my
stringer through because I have, my stringers are face based, and my treads
and risers or not, so obviously you can come in, just extrude this up a little
bit, let me move the stringer in, okay. Extrude this out, so let’s say, this
is a half inch, and this is up a half inch, and then you know, you might want a
little bit of a look around at the end. So let’s push this out, just a teeny
tiny bit. And then if you wanted it to be round,
you could always draw this circle here. Extrude that along, gonna hit E for the
eraser tool, then hit ctrl to hide that line. And then if this is too far, like I
think that there’s just a little too much, just bring it back. Let’s try
something more like that. Obviously you might want to Finnick with this a little
bit, and maybe I want this to be like that. So I see the edge here, but this
gives you the fundamental part of your stairs, and maybe I don’t want to top, I
want this to be unique. A unique component, and I don’t want there to be a
top piece. Extrude this…maybe the floor is then, you
know, the floor turns into that instead of the it being an actual tread. So we’re
not going to do the railing today but this should give you a good idea of how
to create some stairs. I like doing it measuring the floor first, because that’s
typically how house stairs are done anyway. You’re not gonna pick a number
that I want my risers to be seven inches because it’s never exact. So you just
want to be careful, make sure that your stairs are within code, if you’re doing
it for an actual project, but it’s a quick way without having to get out of
calculator to figure out how many steps you’re gonna need. So hopefully this helped, if you liked this video, please don’t forget to like,
subscribe and share this video with your friends! And as always, happy hacking! All right, designers! Just because this episode of designer hacks is over, doesn’t mean we’re leaving you out in the cold! Tony’s got tons of great
content available at designerhacks.com, so join design nation right now and
we’ll see you on the next episode of designer hacks!

Itoo Railclone plugin tutorial. 3ds max Introduction

Itoo Railclone plugin tutorial. 3ds max Introduction


Hello everyone! Andrew Krivulya Charly with you! and this is the first part of my course on Railclone. I’ll start this lesson with a brief overview of all features of this plugin. Let’s Go! And the first most important feature – is the versatility. Using in architecture. Create almost any architectural components, including floors, ceilings, facade systems, windows blinds and more. RealClone ideal for the linear structures, such as – road, bridges, street lights, fences, sidewalks, railway lines and more. You have an ability to use it in industrial design. Pipes, ducts, air conditioners, barriers, sidewalks and much more. With RealClone there are no restrictions on your creation. Unlike other scripts and plug-ins, designed by one type of models – In Railclone you can create virtually any parametric an object. Next feature – easy to use. Railclone uses easy-to-understand graphics Style Editor to create complex structures in contrast to other procedural tools – absolutely no Programming knowledge isn’t required. Styles are created by combining simple node. Because of this – you can create sophisticated treatment facilities ready to render in minutes Next feature – speed. With the instances – you can distribute and visualize billions of polygons with minimum expenditure of time to render. RailClone fully multithreaded and optimized for fast rendering. Using point cloud display mode and proprietary geometry shaders – you can create and visualize huge parametric Objects consist of thousands of parts with high detail. For example, in the scene – only 700 million polygons used for seats. And so – it looks like the whole scene. I think – no need to disclose the total number of polygons. Here – and all so clear. And here – a good example of using point cloud in the viewport. This is a very optimizes with complex scenes. Next feature – adaptability. RailClone converts, breaks and deforms the geometry for creating a seamless object Just set the rules of construction and all the strain used automatically – even on curved paths. The same rule works with complex geometry. Just set the build rules and all the necessary deformation will be applied automatically even with the complex curves. Advanced algorithm for creating objects – it Another of the main plug features. RailClone uses it to deform geometry, repetition sloping paths and surfaces. The slopes and uneven walls, stairs, handrails, balustrades, and stepped fences – is no longer a time consuming task to create in 3ds max. Also – there is a possibility to projecting parts on the surface. RailClone always fully interactive for quick modeling. RailClone saves you time. The PRO version comes with a than 350 predefined styles – including fences, railings, barriers, traffic, walls and more. Library browser completely customizable. You can add new categories, and model with one click and instantly share them with your colleagues. Let’s talk about the difference between Lite and Pro version. The first limitation in Lite version is only the possibility of creating a one generator. In the Pro version this number is unlimited. The two generators are based on RailClone array basis. They use rules to combining, converting, deformation cut, bevel, UV maps and mesh distribution. So, to create complex parametric models – one generator is not enough in Lite version The following restriction applies and the use of splines and deformability on mesh by the Z axis with the three adaptive methods heights. That is, with the Lite version – you again not in a good situation=) Another motivation – to buy Pro, if you want to create a very complex model. Next is a limit on the creation of objects. The so-called – segments. In the Lite version – you can create only three segments But complex models requires a far large quantity. Then, there is a limit on the conversion to Editable Mesh. Simplified library. No setting for it. And of course – useful RailClone Tools. I will analyze in detail all of this features in the following tutorial. This is the end=) Krivulya Andrew Charly will be with you. If you click the thumbs up button – I will be very pleased. After all, I’m trying to create this tutorials for you. Subscribe to this channel by the Subscribe button to not to miss the new releases. Share with you friends – through the button “Share” Do not be greedy – they also want to gain this knowledge. Also, if you click on the icon with the letter “B” You will brings to my tutorial group in Vkontakte. Write your suggestions, comments and questions. If – you want to see the previous lesson – In which – I analyze the Redshift render That easily click on the preview. If you want to see my Stores with models or my portfolio – So click on the icons – 3ddd, CGTrader and Artstation. By the way, you can follow the schedule of lessons in my blog. There I load a sample list of the future lessons. That’s all=) See you in the next lesson! Peace for everyone!

Blueprint 3D iPhone Gameplay Review – AppSpy.com

Blueprint 3D iPhone Gameplay Review – AppSpy.com


Solving a jigsaw puzzle is a pastime that
has survived for generations and may well continue to see its appeal in to the future
as fans of the simple time-waster test their observation skills to match and piece together
beautiful images one jagged piece at a time. Blueprint 3D by FDG Mobile Games pushes the
limits of the concept by taking imagery and blowing it up in to dozens, if not hundreds
of fragments ballooned out in to a 3D space and it’s up to you to reassemble it in mere
seconds. Sounds impossible? Thankfully the order of
the pieces are already figured out for you, but you’ll still need to rotate and spin the
3D mess in order to bring to focus the 2D image you’re after. This is easier said than
done as pieces are also skewed and twisted to conform to only one specific perspective,
making it hard to simply swipe around to cheat the system. It’s a masterfully considered puzzle concept
with a simple control scheme of swiping to spin and double-touch twisting to rotate the
perspective accordingly. Stars are awarded for the speed in which you can align the fragments
correctly and with over 240 puzzles currently available there’s a lot to conquer. Part of what makes Blueprint 3D challenging
is your own familiarity with a variety of objects. Each category picks a handful of
common and somewhat uncommon sights, making it hard to realize whether or not you’re even
close to solving a puzzle until it locks in and gives you your final score. With continued support from FDG, Blueprint
3D could have truly amazing longevity as you constantly jump in to new categories of images
set to stump you. Though even without this, the game is immediately engaging and rewarding
and a definite must have for casual and puzzle gamers alike.

3D RGB Text Animation with HTML/CSS

3D RGB Text Animation with HTML/CSS


hello and welcome to red stapler channel
in this tutorial we will show you how to create a 3d text effect with RGB colour
animation using pure CSS in just a few minutes let’s check it out so first
let’s start with creating a text div I will also assign a class for it too then we are going to find a suitable
font for this tutorial I’m going to use dock number 11 which has nice bold text
style after downloaded and placed the font in
the web folder I’m going to import it using font face rule I will set the font size and family
our spacing also change the color to almost white and here’s the key step since we can’t
create an actual 3d text with CSS we are going to apply multiple layers of text
shadow to imitate the 3d effect instead first I’m going to create bottom text
body using three layers of white smoke color but this technique it will look
like the text is actually have depth you can repeat it as many times as you
like depend on how much step you need for this tutorial I will do it three
times don’t forget to increase the offset of each layer too and next we will create the actual
shadow first let’s start with long soft bottom shadow we will use two
layers of high blur amount transparent black shadow then we’ll create a short bottom shadow to emphasize the 3d depth then create left and right shadow
using moderate blur amount and finally add a white shining light to
the text using very high blur amount of white shadow at this point many of you might happy
with a result already but for this tutorial we will try to add RGB light
cycle effects to the text first let’s create a pseudo element I will duplicate
all the text properties from the orginal then use absolute position and zero top
left now you will see that the text has
jumped to the top left corner instead of overlapping the original text this
because we haven’t set the position to the parent yet
for now let’s add the light effect first let’s start with a blue color then set position relative to the parent next let’s create the animation we will
use keyframes property to cycle through five colors by changing the text shadow
you can use less color or add more if you like and finally set the animation timing
function and repeat it and that’s all for this tutorial hope you
guys enjoy if you want to see more dev tips and tutorials subscribe our channel
to stay tuned for weekly update thanks for watching see you next time bye