How To Choose a Color Scheme || Shopify Help Center 2019

How To Choose a Color Scheme || Shopify Help Center 2019


This video discusses how to optimize the color
scheme of your store and why it’s important for accessibility. Color scheme refers to a combination of colors. You need to consider how these colors are
displayed in your online store, and how they interact with one another. Colors draw out emotions and reactions from
customers when visiting your store. It’s important to use a color palette to
attract your target market that also matches your branding. The color palette is often the first thing
the eye is drawn to so it’s important to explore these details. When choosing a color scheme, there are four
different color theories to consider. Complementary colors – often referred to as
“opposite colors” like black and white. Warm vs. cool colors – colors like red and
orange that make you think of heat vs blue or purple that makes you think of something
cold Achromatic colors – like grey, black and white
are colors that have no hues or saturation Monochromatic colors – are all shades of color
coming from the same hue, like different shades and tones of purple When choosing a color scheme for your online
store, you want to consider the following: who your target market is, the message you’d
like to display to customers, and color schemes used in your industry sector. For example, in the renewable energy industry,
the three colors that are commonly used together are white, green and blue. Another example is if you’re selling vibrant
colored fitness wear and are targeting females aged 15-30, then an achromatic color scheme
(shades of grey, black and white) might not suit this market or the brand message very
well. However, monochromatic colors used in the
brand’s product line like purple suits both the market and the brand message. Aside from the target market, you also want
to be aware of any colors around a call to action, like the Add to cart button. You want this button to stand out, so using
a high contrast complementary color is a great idea. This example shows the default colors on the
theme Venture. The blue Add to cart button against a white
background makes the button stand out. You see how the color contrast draws the eye
to the intended action, Add to cart. Whereas with this example, the Add to cart
button is light grey and the background is white, so the button doesn’t stand out. The Add to cart button blends into the content
resulting in fewer clicks, and fewer purchases. Finally, you need to consider accessibility
when choosing a color scheme. When you edit the colors for your online store,
make sure that all of your text is accessible to customers who are colorblind or otherwise
visually impaired. These customers rely on adequate color contrast
to visually differentiate one thing from another. Use the online contrast ratio tool linked
below, to check the contrast of the different parts of your store. This example shows a theme using the Rich
Text section. The light blue and red text color do not compliment
the blue background making it very difficult to read. If a customer isn’t able to easily read
and understand products, they’ll likely leave the store resulting in a loss of revenue. Instead, select what color scheme you’d
like to use such as complementary colors. Then, try using the color theory known as
Tetrad, meaning 4 colors in total. This example shows the same blue background,
with bright a yellow header, a lighter shade of yellow for the paragraph text, and a teal
line to offset the text and footer. If you’re not sure what colors compliment
one another, try using the website contrast-ratio.com for advice. Choose the base or background color and the
system recommends alternative colors based on proper contrast techniques. For more videos on how to grow your business,
subscribe now! If you still have questions, comment below
or contact the Shopify support team directly.

Google Chrome Extensions and Accessibility

Google Chrome Extensions and Accessibility


Hi I’m Rachel and I am a software engineer
on the Google Accessibility Engineering team. In this video I want to talk to you about
how you can develop extensions for Chrome that can be useful for users with disabilities. For users with disabilities such as blindness,
low vision, deafness, or limited dexterity, the web can be difficult or even impossible
to navigate. From interfaces that don’t allow keyboard navigation to text that is
too small to read, users with special needs can find a lot of obstacles in front of them
and their favorite content. Chrome browser extensions can help by enabling users to customize
many aspects of the browser and the web. One extension that I’ve been working on
for a while is called ChromeVis.  It’s an extension that gives you the ability to
magnify any selected text on a webpage. ChromeVis displays the magnified text inside
of a floating lens, so the original page layout is preserved. This extension is intended for users with
low vision, and I have included some key features that are important to this user group. First, the extension is completely keyboard
navigable. You can move the selection around the page
without ever touching the mouse. You can use keyboard shortcuts to specify whether you
want to move the selection by paragraph, sentence, word, or even character. Second, both the lens text color and the lens
background color can be changed. This is also done through keyboard shortcuts.
This way, you can adjust the lens to achieve your desired contrast between foreground and
background. And you can save several different combinations of foreground and background
color. Finally, we included two layout options for
the lens display. You can keep the lens anchored at the top
of the window while scrolling the page underneath it. Or, you can make the lens appear directly
above the selected text, enabling you to see the magnified text in its original context. The ChromeVis options page is an important
part of the extension. Here, you can change the lens colors as well as specify your own
keyboard shortcuts. This is especially important for users who
might be using screen reading software that reserves its own keyboard shortcuts, or when
a user is using a web application like GMail that reserves additional shortcuts. Any developer can integrate features like
those found in ChromeVis into their extension because we’re releasing the code as open
source. There are a few features that I think could be particularly interesting: To move a selection around a web page automatically,
I relied upon the WebKit selection API. I call selection.modify whenever I want to move
a selection forward or backward in the page, and wrapped this call into the functions nextElement
and prevElement. I also did some additional work to clean up
the selections that selection.modify produces to ensure logical movement between

blocks
and so that blank text nodes or spacer nodes are not included in a selection. It was actually a non-trivial problem to determine
the position of selected text, because text nodes do not have position attributes. I ended
up calculating the position by inserting a span at the beginning of the selection range,
determining the position of that span, and then deleting the span. If you think these functions would be useful,
please feel free to include our selection JavaScript libraries inside your own extension. Including keyboard navigation, text size options,
and color options are some simple ways to make your extensions more accessible to users
and give the browser more flexibility in how content is displayed. If you want more specific
information on writing accessible extensions, please see the new Accessibility implementation
guide in the Chrome Extensions Developer’s Guide at code.google.com/chrome/extensions
Joomla Accessibility – UserWay Installation Guide

Joomla Accessibility – UserWay Installation Guide


Hi everyone! In this video, I’m gonna show you how to install UserWay widget in Joomla. You must follow all these steps to get the code snippet that you will later paste on your site. Some steps are customization options that you can actually skip. But in this tutorial, I will show you all of the steps. So let’s begin. Visit userway.org and click on “Get the Widget.” Step number one is add your website address. Don’t forget to agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Click on “Next.” Step number two.
Add your name, last name, and your email. Click on “Next.” To step number three. Here you can choose the type of icon that you want to display. You can choose among these four. Let’s click on “Next” to step number four where you will select the size. No matter which size you choose, mobile devices will always display this smaller size. Let’s click on “Next” to step number five. Here with this color picker, you can choose the color of your button so it matches the design of your site. Let’s click on “Next” to step number six, where you can select the position
of the button on your site. Select your preferred one and continue
to step number seven. Here you can choose the widget’s language. You can let the widget to automatically
detect the language of your visitor. Or if you want to force the widget to display in a specific language, then open this list and select yours. Let’s continue to step number eight. It’s very important to make
your site accessible, but it’s also very important to have an accessibility statement. If you don’t have one, don’t worry because we can help you with that. Just click on “No/I don’t know,”
and we will help you with that later. Let’s continue to step number nine. If you’re interested in advanced custom options for this widget, then I strongly recommend you to click on “I’d like to learn more” for more information. And last, scroll down to the last step where we’ll get our code. Click on “Copy,” and let’s go to Joomla. I’m in Joomla control panel.
The code is copied to my clipboard, so now follow me to paste this code before a body closing tag. Here in this upper menu, click on “Extensions,” “Templates,” and again “Templates.” Here you have to select the template that you’re working on. I’m going to select mine, which is this one over here. Now, I’m inside the template and now you should find the index.php file. So here on the left. Here it is. Click on it. And now let’s search for the body closing tag. So I’m gonna scroll all the way down. Here it is. This is the body closing tag. So
I’m gonna paste the code right above it. Okay? Just gonna get some space so I can paste the code. Here it is. Click on “Save.” And you’re done. Now let’s preview the site. And here’s our widget. If you see the widget, that means that you have installed everything correctly. But there’s another way to verify the
installation. Let’s go back to userway.org, and I’ll show you how to do it. You can also click on the “Let’s Verify” button to make sure that you’ve done everything correctly. But again, if you already see the widget on your site that means that everything’s okay. So what you can do is click on “Skip.” And you get your accessibility statement. This is a template that you can copy, you can edit, add your own details and bring it to your site. If you want to learn how to install UserWay widget in other platforms like Squarespace, Webflow,
WordPress, and many more, you can follow the video that you can see on your screen right now. Visit UserWay YouTube channel, and in
the description below this video you’ll find a list of all the installation
guides for other platforms. Don’t forget to subscribe!

Captions Plugin

Captions Plugin


This video explains how to configure
and install the captions plugin. The captions plugin displays closed captions and
multilingual subtitles for the most popular video players. It also makes your video searchable
and SEO friendly. The easiest way to install the captions plugin
is to insert the embed code from your 3Play Media account into the HTML of your web page. The captions files and search will
be hosted by 3Play Media. To begin, go to My Files and
select the Publish tab. Then click the Video Plugins link beside
the file that you want to publish. Then select the Captions Plugin tab. This opens an interface where you can set
up and preview the captions plugin. Click the checkbox to enable the plugin. Then choose the type of video player
you are using and the settings. For example, you can change the
skin to be light or dark. Or if you select overlay mode, the text will
be displayed on top of the video instead of underneath. You can try out different settings using the
preview window on the left side of the screen. To add the SEO component, select the SEO
Transcript tab and check the box to enable it. This allows search engines to index
the spoken content in your video. The embed code in the bottom right corner
automatically updates when you make changes to the settings. Once you’ve decided on the settings, click
the embed code to select it, and copy it to your clipboard. Then paste it in your web page, right
after the code for the video player. The captions plugin should now
appear on your web page. You can further customize the plugin
by tweaking the embed code. For example, you can control the width and
position, add multiple subtitle language tracks, or disable certain features. For complete details, refer
to support documentation. Although not covered in this video, it’s also
possible to do a self hosted installation, so that the plugin and captions files are
stored internally on your server. Also, note that the captions plugin can be used
in combination with other video plugins, like the interactive transcript. Thank you for watching this video
on using the captions plugin. Please feel free to contact us if you have
any questions or need additional support.

Captioning test with Bruce Lawson’s HTML5 != CSS3 rant

Captioning test with Bruce Lawson’s HTML5 != CSS3 rant


Hi, hi, it’s Bruce Lawson here. I’m here doing
a “Vlog” for 2 reasons. The first is that I think we need to establish what the word
HTML5 means and the second is that I want to try out, in advance of a presentation I’m
giving tonight, my new ranting head gear. This was brought to me from Tokyo by my friend
Nedjma. Thanks, Nedjma! And I believe it says “Mighty Wind”, although it might say
something else, my Japanese is very limited, so I’ll be trying this out to see how well
it works. Anyway, as you know, Remy Sharp and I have written a marvelous book – “Ding!”
[showing book] – all about HTML5 and we bung in some stuff that isn’t HTML5, things like
web workers which were never part of the spec but were from the same working group and things
like we used geo-location, which is nothing to do with the people who wrote HTML5 – It’s
a W3C spec, but what it has in common with HTML5, it is a simple API for JavaScript that
allows you to do cool things for web applications. [Puts on ranting head gear.] But what really,
really gets on my moobs is people who confuse CSS3 or CSS anything and HTML5. Look, HTML
is markup. CSS is [theatrically] gorgeous lovely typography and style and things that
make you go quivery inside if you’re a designer [end theatrics] and JavaScript is for behaviour,
the actual way your application works. These are 3 different things they do, 3 different
things, that’s why they are 3 different technologies, that’s why they got 3 different bloody names.
They are not the same thing. I don’t care if some marketing department or some sexy
company that makes sexy, sexy gorgeous hardware that makes people with otherwise independent
brains go all bloody newspeak and duck think and ooooo woooo – whatever they say about
these new shiny i-things. I don’t care what that company’s marketing
departments say; HTML and CSS are different things and another thing – if _IF_ in your
markup you’ve got maybe a list and that list contains anchors and those anchors go to nowhere
just a hashtag and the only reason for it being there is so you can hang loads of CSS
transforms and transitions and go eeee and weeee and wooooo, then you’re doing it wrong.
Wrong. W.R.O.N.G. Incorrect, you made a mistake. This stuff is not markup. Markup is meaning
and this stuff means nothing, nada, f*ck all. This stuff you do when you mouse over and
you go weee woooo? Lovely, I love it, it’s gorgeous, I want to have your babies, but
do it with canvas, do it with SVG. For God’s sake even do it with Flash, You’re not doing markup – nothing to do with
markup. It’s just wankery. Don’t make a mistake. Look. The Web Standards Project, the WaSP,
Jeffrey Zeldman, Eric Meyer, these are good decent people. They have worked tirelessly
for you, for the web, they have had enough trouble, these men are the only 2 social liberals
in the whole of the United bloody States these men have had enough to deal with all their
lives and what are you doing? You’re weeing, no, worse! You’re doing number 2, a number
2 on the legacy of messrs Zeldman and Meyer! Every time you confuse HTML5 and CSS, they’re
not the same thing, they’re different and if you confuse them, there’s only one thing
that most mature and sensible adults will say and that’s your mom works for McDonald’s
for minimum wage. [Angry grunt sound.] [Removes ranting hat] So I think we’ve satisfactorily established
the fact that we need to keep our nomenclature straight. Thanks very much for listening.
Goodbye.

Document Accessibility Toolbar

Document Accessibility Toolbar


My name is Leona Zumbo and I’m a Digital Accessibility Consultant
for Vision Australia. The Document Accessibility
Toolbar came about because we were running many Word and
PDF courses and the attendees were absolutely
overwhelmed with the amount of work they have to do to create
accessible Word documents. So we came up with this concept
where we decided we would take the
default functionality within Microsoft Word and create some of our own tools and macros to speed up the process of
creating those accessible documents. I’m Neil King, National Manager of Digital Access at Vision
Australia. The assumption is that Word is
an accessible format. But like all formats, it’s only
accessible if we make it accessible. I’m David Masters, Corporate
Affairs Manager for Microsoft Australia. We have a lot of accessibility
features in Word and in Microsoft Office and I think a lot of people just
aren’t aware of them, and so for an organisation to
make those easily discoverable and easy to
find and to provide a process in the
system that helps employees in that organisation
to create accessible documents, it’s a
great step. At a high level some of the
features within the tool are the colour contrast
analyser, a screen reader, a Word to HTML
converter. There’s also some basic
techniques that someone might want to consider when
creating a Word document, such as creating structure,
accessible navigation, tables that are optimised for
accessibility, and the great thing about this
tool is that it allows you to quickly
implement those techniques. The tool will be free to
download and works on Microsoft Word versions 2010
up to 2016. I think the DAT will really help
organisations to introduce accessibility in to
their day-to-day work by raising the awareness of
accessibility and as they’re working through
documents show them what accessibility features
and functions there are available to them to
make those documents more accessible. That’s where the DAT really
comes into play. The Document Accessibility
Toolbar enables you to not only create and
validate accessibility but also lets you as well
convert that to another accessible format, such as HTML. My name’s Wayne Hawkins. I’m Disability Policy Advisor
with ACCAN. ACCAN saw the inclusion of the
DAT as one of our grants projects as a really beneficial for
consumers with disability. It’s an almost fool-proof way of creating accessible
documentation. The absolute key benefit is the
assurance of knowing that you’re creating an accessible Word document, which
provides equal access to information for
everyone. And I think that’s one of the great benefits of this tool, is that people are being guided when they’re using the DAT in
making accessible documentation rather
than having to work it out themselves. It doesn’t matter what type of
document you’re creating. This one ribbon
will allow you to create an accessible output. It basically becomes business as
usual without adding any extra
complexities. So download it today, share it and be part of positive change