Photoshop CS6: Creative Logo Design

Photoshop CS6: Creative Logo Design


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Blueprint: Bringing Web Search into the Development Environment

Blueprint: Bringing Web Search into the Development Environment


Programmers today turn to the web for a variety
of reasons. They use the web for just in time learning
of new languages and APIs. They look for clarification of familiar classes or functions. Finally,
they also use the web as a reminder of well known lines of code they prefer to copy rather
than type manually. Although general purposes search engines and
browsers enable programmers to find relevant information, they are not designed to support
the programming task directly. To get accurate results users have to typically specify the
programming language and framework version they are using. And they may have to look
through several pages to find appropriate code examples. We propose extending the existing auto complete
programing interface to include web search. By integrating web search directly in the
development environment, user queries can be augmented with relevant programming context. and the search results display can be customized
to display available code examples. To demonstrate these ideas, we implemented
Blueprint, a plug-in for the Adobe Flex Builder development environment and studied its use
in a comparative laboratory study in a three-month field-deployment. Let’s follow Jenny as she uses Blueprint to
prototype a web application for comparing power consumption. First, Jenny needs to retrieve power usage
data from a web service that returns XML formatted data. Although Jenny has written similar code previously,
she can’t remember the exact code she needs. She does remember that one of the main classes
involved began with URL. So, she types the URL into her code and uses auto-complete to
remember the URL loader class. Although she remembers the class name, Jenny still doesn’t
know how to use it. With another hot key, Jenny brings up the Blueprint search interface
which automatically start searching for URL loader. Blueprint augments Jenny’s query with the
language and framework version she’s using, and returns appropriate examples that show
how to use a URL loader. Jenny scrolls through the first few examples and sees one that creates
an XML object from the response data. She selects the parts she wants, and presses
enter. The code along with the query she used and the source URL are pasted in her project.
Jenny makes some edits to the examples and runs the code in Flex Builder’s debugger to
confirm the XML has loaded, and to inspect its format. Next, she wants to change the user’s mouse
cursor to a busy cursor while the data is being loaded. But since she had never done
this before, she just types busy cursor in the Blueprint search box. She looks over the
code in the first example returned and sees the line. Cursor manager set busy cursor. She selects
this line and presses “Enter” to paste it into her project. Then she selects the code
for removing the busy cursor and presses enter again. But now, when she tries to compile, Jenny
gets an error. She forgot to import Cursor Manager. She goes back to the busy cursor
query and adds the relevant line to her code. Finally Jenny want to make a chart for the
data. She searches for charting and docks the blueprint
result window as a panel in her development environment, so she can browse the results
in a large persistent view. When source pages provide a running example, blueprint presents
this example next to the source code. Eventually Jenny decides on a line chart and
copies the example code from the blueprint panel into her project. She modifies it to
bind the chart to her XML data. After only a few minutes her prototype is
complete. We deployed blue print in the field through
the Adobe Labs website and studied tool adoption over three months. Over two thousand people
installed and used blue print. And over a hundred and fifty of these people, used blueprint
more than 10 times. Many integrated blueprint in their work flow and began relying on it
to accomplish their programming tasks.

How to integrate clips with different looks/colorspace in After Effects (Match Levels) | Tutorial

How to integrate clips with different looks/colorspace in After Effects (Match Levels) | Tutorial


– Hi, my name is Carlos and in this video, I’ll show you the easiest way to match the color of two
different pieces of footage without any special plug-ins. Let’s get to it. I did make a user preset
that makes things easier and the link should be in the description and that will have the
instructions to install it as well. But to be clear, you don’t need my preset. You can replicate this on
your own just using levels, but the preset just makes
the process much faster. Anyway, I have this footage, and I want to integrate this picture. Let’s say, like this. As you can see, the footage
is in a different color space, so it looks very flat
compared to the picture. And of course, this
picture could be anything. It could an Illustrator file or something, like a design that someone
made, et cetera, et cetera. So I’ll find my preset and
I called it Match Levels. So I’ll apply it to the
layer I wanna modify, so in this case the picture, because that’s what I
wanna match to the footage. And that puts all these
effects on the layer. And all these are stock effects that just come with After Effects they just have some expressions on them. The first thing we’re going to do is make sure the levels
on here are turned off because the next thing we’re going to do is select colors from the picture, and we want to make
sure that we select them from the original picture,
and not one that’s modified by the levels effect that we’re applying. Once that’s done, we’re
going to select the colors. We need to find the darkest
and the brightest parts of each of the two images.
Input is the picture that we’re adding, basically. Or, the picture that we’re
applying this effect to. And in this case it’s this
picture that we’re putting on top of the monitor, and
the output is the picture that we want to match, so in this case, the footage underneath. Let me start with the input,
and I’m going to select the darkest part that I
can find, and, you know, this part is pretty
black, so I’ll do that. Now let’s do the same for input white, and now we just have to do
the same for output black and output white, except
I’ll select the blackest and whitest parts of the
target layer, in this case the, underlying footage. So, let’s see, I think
this is, this will work, and for the brightest, here, alright? Now, let’s turn back on
the levels and, done! Alright, so let me explain
real quick what happened here. Basically all we did
was remap the blackest and whitest points of the
picture so they matched the footage, and that stretches
all the colors in between so they match much better. And by blackest and whitest
points I of course mean all three RGB levels,
and it’s not going to always be a perfect match, in part because I selected
the colors by hand, and actually an improvement
that I want to make is to automatically find the
blackest and whitest points, but as it is, this works pretty well for most situations, really. I’ve used it a ton over
the last year or so. I also include a multiplier
in case you are to adjust the amount of levels
matching, so zero would be, don’t change anything,
and a hundred would be, matching the black and
white points perfectly. But you can set anything in
between, and even go negative, which matches the colors
in the opposite direction, or go about a hundred, which
exaggerates the adjustments. Some checks you might need
to do from time to time include adjusting the, adding
a saturation adjustment or, or you can input the input colors, and, you know, you can play with that, but this should take you 90% of the way. Anyway, I hope this helps
you, I know it has helped me match screens, signs, and all
sorts of footage tremendously, and I know my channel is,
it’s a bit of a mixture of different things, but
I’m working more of these After Effects tips videos,
so if you’d like to know when the next one comes out,
make sure the subscribe. And if you feel After Effects
is not taking advantage of your multi-core computer
when it comes to rendering, or if you have several machines that you’d like to hook up together to speed up your renders, take a look at my app,
it’s called Render Boss, links should also be in the description. Anyway, I hope that was helpful,
see you in the next video. Bye.
– Studies show that waiting for renders can
be dangerous for your health. Render Boss forces your
computer to open more threads, bossing it around to
render, render, render, and that’s not all, you
can add or remove threads as much as you like in
the middle of your render. But wait, there’s more. You don’t have to be limited
to a single computer. If you have several machines on a network, Render Boss can use them
all at the same time, even for video files. Tired of using the confusing command line to set multi-machine renders?
(beeping)

Photography Logo: Learn How to Design a Photography Logo in Photoshop [photography logo]

Photography Logo: Learn How to Design a Photography Logo in Photoshop [photography logo]


Grab a piece of paper and a pen and give your initial signature on it Take a picture on your phone and import that picture on your pc Open that picture in illustrator Then grab the pen tool and start creating a path on the picture It will take some time and some practice too Just give some stroke weight And after that it’s almost ready Select the path and go to object – expand click – OK Grab the direct selection tool and give some rounded corner Grab the type tool and write the other text Make some adjustment if need Now your signature type photography logo is ready THANK YOU GUYS LIKE SHEAR SUBSCRIBE

Photoshop Tutorial: How to Design a Monogram LOGO of Interwoven Initials

Photoshop Tutorial: How to Design a Monogram LOGO of Interwoven Initials


Hi. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV.
I’m going to show you how to create a custom, intertwined, monogram logo
centered on a simple, but powerful background. If the middle initial of the monogram is larger than the other two, the middle initial is the surname or last name. The first initial is the first name and the last initial is the middle name. However, if all the initials are the same size, the order of the initials represents the first, middle and last name.
I provided a link to a website that explains the general rules pertaining to monograms. The link is located in the video description. Create a new document by pressing Ctrl + N on Windows or Cmd + N on a Mac. Make the Width: 1200 pixels, the Height: 900 pixels and the Resolution: 300 pixels per inch. Make the Color Mode: RGB at 8 bits per channel. Then click OK. Let’s begin by making the background first. Open your Gradient Tool and make sure
the Linear gradient icon is highlighted. Click the Gradient bar and click the “Black, White” preset. Click the lower, right Stop and the color box. Type in 80, three times. This gives us 50% gray. Then, click OK on the Color Picker and the Gradient Editor. Go to the bottom of the document and hold down Shift as you drag up the gradient line to the top. Go to Filter and Filter Gallery. Open the Texture folder and click “Texturizer”. The Texture is Sandstone, the Scaling is 100%, the Relief is 2 and the Light is from the Top. Then, click OK. Double-click on the lock. This unlocks the background and opens the Layer Style window. Click Stroke. Make the Size: 100 pixels and the Position is Inside. Click Inner Glow. Click the color box, pick Black and click OK. Change the Blend Mode to Color Burn and the Opacity to 15%. The Technique is Softer, the Source is Edge, the Choke is 100% and the Size is 100 pixels. Then, click OK. Click the Custom Shape Tool and open the thumbnails. Click to gear icon to open your list of Shape presets. Click Shapes and click OK to see the new set in the thumbnail window. Click the diamond shape, which is between the outline crescent and the outline diamond. Make sure it’s not the wider diamond,
since that shape has slightly, rounded corners. Tick “Unconstrained” and check “From Center”. Choose “Path” If you’re working on CS5 or earlier, the Path Tool Mode is here. We want to make guidelines
that crisscross the center of the document. To do this, go to View and click “New Guide”. With the horizontal orientation ticked, type in 50%. Click OK or press Enter or Return. If you don’t see the guideline, press Ctrl or Cmd + H. Go back to View, New Guide and tick “Vertical”. As before, type in 50%. Then, click OK. Go to the center of the guidelines
and drag out a diamond shape to the edges of the top, bottom and sides. Open the Paths panel. If you don’t see it, go to Window and Paths. Click the icon at the upper, right corner and click “Make Selection”. Keep the Feather Radius at 0.5 pixels, which is the default amount and click OK. The path is now a selection. Open back up the Layers panel. We’ll cut
the diamond-shaped selection from the background and copy it to its own layer. To do this, press Ctrl or Cmd + J. Click off the eyeball of the Stroke to hide it and double-click on “Effects” to open the Layer Style window. Click Bevel & Emboss. The Style is Inner Bevel, the Technique is Chisel hard and the Depth is 100%. The Direction is Down and the Size is 14 pixels. Then click OK. Press Ctrl or Cmd + H to hide the guidelines. We’re ready to set our text. Open your Horizontal Type Tool and pick a font. I’m using Trajan Pro Regular, which you can download from the link I provided. The link is located in the video description or project files. Make the Size 125 points, Smooth, and Center Alignment.
The color is irrelevant, since we’re going to give the text a gradient and color overlay. Type the upper case letter of your first name. To move it, open your Move Tool and drag it to the center. Click the “fx” icon and click Bevel & Emboss. The Style is Inner Bevel and the Technique is Smooth. Drag the Depth all the way to the right. The Direction is Up and the Size is 7 pixels. Click Gradient Overlay. Click the gradient bar and click the lower, left Stop. Click the color box and type in six “c”s. This gives us 80% gray. Click OK and click on the lower, right Stop. Click the color box and this time, type in 4D, three times. This gives us 30% gray. Click OK on both windows. Click Color Overlay and the color box. Pick an overall color that you’d like for your monogram. You can always change it later. I’ll type in 1 F A 7 E D. Click OK or press Enter or Return. Change the Blend Mode to Color. Click Inner Glow. Change the Blend Mode to Hard Mix and click the color box. Pick a lighter, brighter version of the color you picked earlier. I’ll type in 0 0 F F F 6. Click OK or press Enter or Return. Notice the color you picked is now in the color box. Make the Choke 22% and the Size 15 pixels. click stroke make the signs 14 pixels and the position is outside then click
OK because this monogram has three initials
will make two copies of it first go to view and it snapped is
checked just click on it to turn it off to make
two copies of the letter press Control command J twice hold down SHIFT as you drag a letter to
the right holding SHIFT keeps it aligned click on
the other copy to make it acted and again hold down
SHIFT as he dragged a letter to the left this
letter will be your first initial up the monogram typing a letter of your first name make a copy above it active and double
click it to highlight the letter now typing the first letter of your
middle name scroll down to the bottom and double
click on a large t up the original letter type the first
initial of your last name double-click the large tea again to
highlight the letter will increase the size 280 points hoping your move till and drag it down approximately halfway between the top
and bottom of the other initials because it’s larger than the others will
increase the inner glow effect to compensate for its size to do this double click on it in a glow effect to
open it in the lair style window change the shokh 20 and the size 230
pixels then click OK to save space in the Layers panel will
click the small triangles on each of the initials to collapse the list affects let’s placed into a folder to do this
shift click on the top initial to highlight the mall
and press Control command she let’s name it original text it’s always
a good idea to save your original text or objects make a copy of it and hide the original
folder open the folder copy will convert each
initial into a smart object so we can ultimately
at fixed drop shadows on each of them as well as he
neighboring us to change or modify the letters if we want to at some point cook the top
initial to make it active and quickly icon at the top right corner click convert to smart object you know
what a smart object when it has this icon on the thumbnail repeat the steps
for the other initials make your top initial active and hold
down shift as you drag it to the left in this
case I’d like to position a letter so it just
touches the other when it’s close I’ll use my left or
right arrow keys on my keyboard to move it 1 pixel at a time make the initial below it active and
again hold down SHIFT as you drag it to the
right control-click or command click on the
fun a lot the letter to make a selection of shape and click the layer mask icon to make a
layer mask the selection next to the initial repeat this for the
top letter control-click or command click on a
large letter at the bottom to make a selection up it shaped press
control or command H twice to hide the selection and the guidelines clicky FX icon and click drop shadow the blend mode is
multiply the opacity is 35 percent distance is 30 pixels and the size is 10 pixels then click OK go to drop shadow hold down alt or option and track a copy of the drop
shadow of fact to the layer below it repeat this for the bottom letter next will interweave them let’s quickly
review the layout water in the Layers panel the top initial represents your middle
name the initial below it is your first name
and the large bottom initial is your last name hoping your pencil
tool and shoes and medium-sized hit for this
example argues a forty pixel size make sure the
Harkness is a hundred percent in this example at like 2 overlap each ask over the Chi so I’ll make sure the layer mask a PG is
acted remember the selection up the large
initial of your last name is active but hidden our pressure over an
area of the letter G to hide it I’m actually brushing over its lair mask
which hides the latter the selection upbeat ass is confining my
brush to the inside at the s shaped if I want to overlap be ask
over the are I’ll make a layer mask the are
active and brush over the are since I like the are overlapping the s a
press Control a command see to undo the last step
loans using these techniques you can create a
custom monogram logo for anyone I’m this is Marty from Blue
Lightning TD thanks for watching in

Basic logo design techniques – Adobe illustrator CC Tutorial

Basic logo design techniques – Adobe illustrator CC Tutorial


Hi Everyone this Kage from logo Instant.com Welcome back to another video tutorial. Today, we are trying something different,
a concept I had in mind the other day. IT is very simple to achieve and it is meant
to show you that it doesn’t take much sometimes to produce
visualy coherent designs. Once again this is a 3 minutes logo which
I hope you will like. If interested to download the source file
of the resulting tutorial, as well as loads of other freebie logos, check out our website
logoInstant.com… or click the link below in the description! We’re serving tons of logo templates for your
next project, fully layered and easy to customize. Let’s get started!