Photoshop: How to Create Graphic Portraits from Photos

Photoshop: How to Create Graphic Portraits from Photos


Hi. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV. I’m going to show you how to create stunning,
graphic portraits from photos. Before we begin, make sure you click the small
“Subscribe” button at the lower, right corner to let you know as soon as I upload new Photoshop
tutorials! Open a photo of a face that you’d like to
use for this project. I downloaded this one from Shutterstock. To ensure that your results will look similar
to mine, check your image’s size and resolution by pressing Alt + Ctrl + I on Windows or Option + Cmd + I on a Mac or by going to Image and Image Size. Make it approximately this size and its resolution:
150 pixels per inch. The first step is to separate our subject from its background by making a selection around our subject. There are many ways to do this and I covered
them all in my prior tutorials. I generally use the Quick Selection Tool,
but since the background in this example is a solid color, I’ll use the Magic Wand Tool. If you’re using this tool, as well, make sure
“Contiguous” is checked. This ensures that the inside of your subject
will not be selected. If you need to add a selection to another
area of the background, click this “Add to” icon, which adds selections as you click on your image. I’ll click the background to make the selection. To check your selection, press “Q” on your
keyboard to see it as a quick mask. Press “Q” again to revert it back into a selection. Invert the selection by pressing Ctrl + Shift
+ I on Windows or Cmd + Shift + I on a Mac. To refine the edge of your selection, go to
Select. If you’re using a version earlier than CC
2015.5, click “Refine Edge. If you’re using CC 2015.5 or later, click
“Select and Mask”. If you prefer to use Refine Edge instead of
Select and Mask, Shift-click “Select and Mask”. I did in-depth tutorials on both filters,
so if you’d like to watch them, I includes their links in my video’s description. I’ll click the “Overlay” view and check “Smart Radius”, which tells Photoshop to detect hard and soft edges. I’ll drag the Radius to 5 and bush over the
edge of the hair. Check, “Decontaminate Colors”, which minimizes
the background color from leaching into the edges of our subject. Output it to a “New Layer with Layer Mask” and click “OK’. We’ll make a new layer below the active layer
by Ctrl-clicking or Cmd-clicking the New Layer icon. We’ll fill the empty layer with white, but
first, check your foreground and background colors. If they’re not black and white respectively,
press “D” on your keyboard. Since white is your background color, press
Ctrl or Cmd + Delete. We’ll convert our visible image into a Smart
Object, so we can modify it non-destructively. To do this, Shift click the top layer to make
it active, as well, and click the icon at the upper, right corner. Click, “Convert to Smart Object”. Go to Filter, Blur and Gaussian Blur. For now, blur it 6 pixels. Go to Image, Adjustments and Threshold. I’ll keep its default Level at 128, however,
you can adjust your portrait’s density by sliding the level to the right or left. You can also adjust it by changing the amount of blur. Double-click Gaussian Blur. If you see this message, it’s just letting
us know that we won’t see the Threshold effect until we’re done with Gaussian Blur. I’ll increase the Blur Radius to 10 and click
OK or press Enter or Return. As you can see, my image filled in more and
became denser. I’ll undo the last step by pressing Ctrl or Cmd + z. Conversely, it we were to decrease the blur
radius, our image would fill in less. I’ll revert it back to the original blur of
6 pixels and the Threshold of 128 levels. As before, convert your image into a Smart Object. Next, we’ll create a gradient background. Click the New Layer icon to make a new layer. Fill it with any color for now, since we’ll
be replacing it with a gradient overlay. I’ll fill it with my foreground color, which is black. Double-click the layer to open its Layer Style window. Click “Gradient Overlay”. The Blend Mode is Normal and the Opacity is 100%. Make sure “Reverse” is unchecked and make
the Style: “Radial”. The Angle is 90 degrees and the Scale is 150%.Click
the gradient bar to open the Gradient Editor. Click the “Black, White” box and the lower,
left Stop. Click the box and pick a light color for the
center of your gradient. Since I already know the color I want, I’ll
type it into the hexadecimal field: D3F3FF. Then, click OK. Click the lower, right Stop and the box. Pick a darker color for the outer areas of
your gradient. I’ll type in: 002871. Once you pick your colors, click OK on the
Color Picker and the Gradient Editor to close them. We can reposition the gradient by dragging it. I’ll drag it up a wee bit from the center. Convert it into a Smart Object. Make a new layer and temporarily hide the gradient. Open your Channels panel. If you don’t see it, go to Window and Channels. Ctrl-click or Cmd-click the RGB thumbnail
to make a selection of channel’s shape. Invert the selection by pressing Ctrl or Cmd + Shift + I. Open back the Layers panel and fill the selection
with black by pressing Alt or Option + Delete. Deselect it by pressing Ctrl or Cmd + D. Make
the Gradient visible again and double-click the top layer to open its Layer Style window. Click “Color Overlay” and the box. In the hexadecimal field, type in 31, three
times to give us a dark grey color. Click OK. Click “Inner Shadow”. The color is black, the Blend Mode is Multiply
and the Opacity is 50%. The Angle is 90 degrees, the Distance is 12
pixels and the Size is 8 pixels. Convert it into a Smart Object and go to Filter
and Filter Gallery. Open the Texture folder and click “Texturizer”. The “Texture” is “Canvas”, the Scaling is 200%, the “Relief” is 3 and the “Light” is from the “Top”. Once again, Ctrl-click or Cmd-click the face
to make a selection of it. We’re going to create an inverted layer mask
of the selection next to the gradient. Make the gradient active. Alt-click or Option-click the Layer Mask icon. Click the “fx” icon and click “Bevel and Emboss”. The Style is “Inner Bevel” and the Technique
is “Chisel Soft”. The Depth is 50%, the Direction is “Up” and
the Size is 5 pixels. The Angle is 90 degrees and the Altitude is
50 degrees. The Highlight blend mode is “Linear Dodge”
and its opacity is 25%. The Shadow blend mode doesn’t matter, since
its opacity is 0%. Next, we’ll add a starburst pattern behind our subject. Make a new layer. Open your Polygon Tool and choose “Pixels”. If you’re using Photoshop version CS5 or earlier,
the Pixel icon is here. Go to View and make sure “Rulers” and “Snap”
are both checked. If they’re not, just click on them to make them active. Go to the ruler at the top and drag down a
guideline to the center. It’ll snap in place because we have Snap checked. If you don’t see the guideline, press Ctrl
or Cmd + H. Go to the ruler on the left and drag across a guideline to the center, as well. Give it 99 sides and click the gear icon. You can ignore the Path options, since we chose “pixels”. Check “Star” and indent the sides by 80%. Go to the center of the guidelines and drag out your tool until the shape goes beyond the corners. Then, release. Reduce the Fill to 0%, which makes the layer
invisible, but it’ll retain the visibility of any effects we add to it. Double-click the star to open its Layer Style window. Click “Bevel and Emboss”. The Style is Inner Bevel, the Technique is
“Chisel Soft” and the Depth is 50%. The Direction is “Down” and the Size is 2
pixels. The Angle is 90 degrees and the Altitude is
50 degrees. Make the Highlight opacity anywhere from 50
to 70% and the Shadow opacity: 100%. We can remove the guidelines now by going
to View and “Clear Guides”. Next, we’ll remove the star pattern inside the face. Click the Layer Mask icon to make a layer
mask next to the star layer. As soon as you made the layer mask, your foreground
and background colors inverted. Invert it back by clicking this icon or by
pressing “x” on your keyboard. Open your Pencil Tool and Pencil Picker. We’ll adjust the size in a moment. Make its Hardness and Opacity both 100%. Then, press Enter or Return. To make your brush bigger or smaller, press
the right or left bracket key on your keyboard. Brush over areas inside of the face to remove
the star pattern. Lastly, we’ll crop off the bevel along the
top edge of our document by first making a composite snapshot of our visible image. To do this, make the top layer active and
make a new layer above it. To make the composite snapshot, press Alt
+ Ctrl + Shift + E on Windows or Option + Cmd + Shift + E on a Mac. Open your Transform Tool by pressing Ctrl or Cmd + T. At the top, next to the Transform’s width and height, make sure the chain-link icon is active. This links them together, so whatever we type
into one will be applied to the other, as well. Type in 102%, which should be enough to crop
off the bevel at the top. Then, press Enter or Return, twice. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV. Thanks for watching!

Photoshop Tutorial: How to Create a Logo that includes Your Own Face

Photoshop Tutorial: How to Create a Logo that includes Your Own Face


Hi. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV. I’m going to show you how to transform a face
into simple, black and white art and create a design to place the art into. Create a new document by going to File and New. This is the New Layer window in CC 2017. Whatever version you’re using, in the Width
and Height fields, type in 1250 pixels each and the for Resolution, type in 150 pixels per inch. Then, click “Create” or “OK”. Next, we’ll add guide lines that will show
the exact center of our document. If you’re using version CC or later, Go to
“View” and “New Guide Layout”. If you’re using a version earlier than CC,
I’ll show you a work-around in a moment. Type in 2 in the “Number” fields for both
“Columns” and “Rows”. If you’re using a version earlier than CC,
go to View and “New Guide”. Whatever orientation is ticked, type in 50%. Then, go back to View and “New Guide”. This time, tick the other orientation and
again, type in 50%. Click the New Layer icon to make a new layer. Open your Elliptical Marquee Tool and go to
the center of the guide lines. Press and hold Alt or Option + Shift as you
drag out a circular selection approximately this size. Go to Edit and Stroke. Make the Width: 30 pixels, the color is black
and the Location: Inside. Then, click OK or press Enter or Return. Deselect it by pressing Ctrl or Cmd + D. Temporarily
hide the background. Click the “fx” icon and click “Stroke”. Make the Size: 20 pixels and the Position: “Outside”. The color is white. If it isn’t white, just click the color box and pick white. Make the background layer visible again. We’ll make a new layer below the active layer
by Ctrl-clicking or Cmd-clicking the New Layer icon. Open your Rectangular Marquee Tool. To drag out a square selection from the center,
click your mouse or pen and don’t release and press and hold Alt or Option + Shift as you drag your cursor out to the inside edge of your circle. We’ll fill the selection with black and since black is your foreground color, press Alt or Option + Delete. Then, deselect it. Open back your Elliptical Marquee Tool and
drag out a circular selection to the white area between the solid black circle and the black ring. Press the Delete key on your keyboard to delete
the area inside the selection. Then, deselect it. Make the circle layer active. We’ll place our text above it. Open your Horizontal Type Tool and pick a font. I’m using “Glaser Becker Stencil”. If you’d like to use it, I provided its link
in my video’s description or project files below. I’ll make its size approximately 123 points
for now, Sharp and Center Alignment. The color is black. Click on your document and type out your text. To finesse its size and to reposition it,
click your Move Tool and press Ctrl or Cmd + T to open your Transform Tool. Go to a corner and when you see a diagonal,
double-arrow, press and hold, “Shift” as you drag it in or out until your text is flush with both sides of the square shape above it. To slide your text up or down, press the Up
or Down arrow key on your keyboard. Then, press Enter or Return. To slide your entire graphic up, Shift-click
the bottom shape to make all of your graphic layers active and press the Up arrow on your keyboard. We’re going to make a new layer below the bottom shape. Click the bottom shape to make just that layer
active and Ctrl-click or Cmd-click the New Layer icon. Open your Rectangular Marquee Tool again and
go to the center. Click and don’t release as you press and hold
Alt or Option and drag a rectangular selection around your elements approximately this much. Go to Edit and Stroke. Make the Width: 20 pixels, the color black
and the Location: Inside. Then, deselect it. If you want to resize it and/or extend the
top or bottom edge, open your Transform Tool, go to a corner and drag it out or in . I’d
like to extend the bottom edge, so I’ll go to the bottom, middle anchor point of the
Transform and drag it down. Then, I’ll press Enter or Return. We’re ready to begin the steps in creating
your portrait into the design. Go to the top of your Layers panel and make
the top layer active. We’ll place our portrait layer above it. Open a photo of a face that you’d like to
use for this project. I downloaded this one from Shutterstock. The first step is to separate your subject
from its background by making a selection around your subject. There are many ways to do this, but for this
example, I’ll use the Quick Selection Tool. If you’re using this tool as well, drag your
tool over your subject to select it. To remove areas outside your subject, press
and hold Alt or Option as you drag over those areas. To check your selection, press “Q” on your
keyboard to see it as a quick mask. If it looks good to you, press “Q” again to
revert it back into a selection. Click the Layer Mask icon to make a Layer
Mask of the selection. Make a new layer below the active layer and
fill it with white by pressing Ctrl or Cmd + Delete. This fills it with your background color. We’ll convert the 2 layers into one Smart
Object, so we can modify it nondestructively, as well as allowing us to replace our subject
with another face without having to re-do all the effects. Shift-click the top layer to make it active,
as well and click the icon at the upper, right corner of the Layers panel. Click “Convert to Smart Object”. To place the subject into our design, press
“v” to open your Move Tool and drag the subject onto the tab of your design document. Without releasing your mouse or pen, drag
it down onto the image and release. We want to place our subject inside the circle
and hide the areas of our our subject outside the circle. Do to this, Ctrl-click or Cmd-click the ring
to make a selection of its shape. Press “Q” to make it into a Quick Mask. We’ll delete the area of the Quick mask outside the ring. Open your Paint Bucket Tool and click anywhere
outside the ring. Press “Q” again to revert the quick mask back
into a selection. Alt-click or Option-click the Layer Mask icon
to create an inverted layer mask of the selection next to your subject. Click the chain-link between the layer and
the layer mask to unlink them. Doing this, allows us to resize and/or reposition
either of them independently of the other. Make your subject active and open your Transform Tool. Center the face inside the circle and resize
it, so most of the face is showing. Go to Image, Adjustments and Threshold. I’ll keep its default level of 128 and click
OK or press Enter or Return. Go to Filter, Blur and Gaussian Blur. Blur it 4 pixels. Go to Filter and Filter Gallery. Open the Artistic folder and click “Cutout”. Make the number of Levels: 2. I’ll make the “Edge Simplicity”: 5, but feel
free to experiment with this amount. Make the “Edge Fidelity”: 1 and click OK. If you look closely at your portrait, it may
have shapes that are dark grey. To make it completely black, go back to Image,
Adjustments and Threshold. Then, click OK. Lastly, we’ll create a white ring around the portrait. Click the “fx” icon and click “Stroke”. The color is white, the size is 20 pixels
and the Position is “Inside”. This is Marty from Blue lightning TV. Thanks for watching!

Photoshop CS6: Creative Logo Design

Photoshop CS6: Creative Logo Design


Hello! Please subscribe Picture Editor Photoshop and learning Photoshop effects easy for beginners We distribute video around the world. For all countries We put quality lead. Please Subscribe Us And do not forget to leave a comment. We will respond to you in any language! Wish success!

Blueprint: Bringing Web Search into the Development Environment

Blueprint: Bringing Web Search into the Development Environment


Programmers today turn to the web for a variety
of reasons. They use the web for just in time learning
of new languages and APIs. They look for clarification of familiar classes or functions. Finally,
they also use the web as a reminder of well known lines of code they prefer to copy rather
than type manually. Although general purposes search engines and
browsers enable programmers to find relevant information, they are not designed to support
the programming task directly. To get accurate results users have to typically specify the
programming language and framework version they are using. And they may have to look
through several pages to find appropriate code examples. We propose extending the existing auto complete
programing interface to include web search. By integrating web search directly in the
development environment, user queries can be augmented with relevant programming context. and the search results display can be customized
to display available code examples. To demonstrate these ideas, we implemented
Blueprint, a plug-in for the Adobe Flex Builder development environment and studied its use
in a comparative laboratory study in a three-month field-deployment. Let’s follow Jenny as she uses Blueprint to
prototype a web application for comparing power consumption. First, Jenny needs to retrieve power usage
data from a web service that returns XML formatted data. Although Jenny has written similar code previously,
she can’t remember the exact code she needs. She does remember that one of the main classes
involved began with URL. So, she types the URL into her code and uses auto-complete to
remember the URL loader class. Although she remembers the class name, Jenny still doesn’t
know how to use it. With another hot key, Jenny brings up the Blueprint search interface
which automatically start searching for URL loader. Blueprint augments Jenny’s query with the
language and framework version she’s using, and returns appropriate examples that show
how to use a URL loader. Jenny scrolls through the first few examples and sees one that creates
an XML object from the response data. She selects the parts she wants, and presses
enter. The code along with the query she used and the source URL are pasted in her project.
Jenny makes some edits to the examples and runs the code in Flex Builder’s debugger to
confirm the XML has loaded, and to inspect its format. Next, she wants to change the user’s mouse
cursor to a busy cursor while the data is being loaded. But since she had never done
this before, she just types busy cursor in the Blueprint search box. She looks over the
code in the first example returned and sees the line. Cursor manager set busy cursor. She selects
this line and presses “Enter” to paste it into her project. Then she selects the code
for removing the busy cursor and presses enter again. But now, when she tries to compile, Jenny
gets an error. She forgot to import Cursor Manager. She goes back to the busy cursor
query and adds the relevant line to her code. Finally Jenny want to make a chart for the
data. She searches for charting and docks the blueprint
result window as a panel in her development environment, so she can browse the results
in a large persistent view. When source pages provide a running example, blueprint presents
this example next to the source code. Eventually Jenny decides on a line chart and
copies the example code from the blueprint panel into her project. She modifies it to
bind the chart to her XML data. After only a few minutes her prototype is
complete. We deployed blue print in the field through
the Adobe Labs website and studied tool adoption over three months. Over two thousand people
installed and used blue print. And over a hundred and fifty of these people, used blueprint
more than 10 times. Many integrated blueprint in their work flow and began relying on it
to accomplish their programming tasks.

How to integrate clips with different looks/colorspace in After Effects (Match Levels) | Tutorial

How to integrate clips with different looks/colorspace in After Effects (Match Levels) | Tutorial


– Hi, my name is Carlos and in this video, I’ll show you the easiest way to match the color of two
different pieces of footage without any special plug-ins. Let’s get to it. I did make a user preset
that makes things easier and the link should be in the description and that will have the
instructions to install it as well. But to be clear, you don’t need my preset. You can replicate this on
your own just using levels, but the preset just makes
the process much faster. Anyway, I have this footage, and I want to integrate this picture. Let’s say, like this. As you can see, the footage
is in a different color space, so it looks very flat
compared to the picture. And of course, this
picture could be anything. It could an Illustrator file or something, like a design that someone
made, et cetera, et cetera. So I’ll find my preset and
I called it Match Levels. So I’ll apply it to the
layer I wanna modify, so in this case the picture, because that’s what I
wanna match to the footage. And that puts all these
effects on the layer. And all these are stock effects that just come with After Effects they just have some expressions on them. The first thing we’re going to do is make sure the levels
on here are turned off because the next thing we’re going to do is select colors from the picture, and we want to make
sure that we select them from the original picture,
and not one that’s modified by the levels effect that we’re applying. Once that’s done, we’re
going to select the colors. We need to find the darkest
and the brightest parts of each of the two images.
Input is the picture that we’re adding, basically. Or, the picture that we’re
applying this effect to. And in this case it’s this
picture that we’re putting on top of the monitor, and
the output is the picture that we want to match, so in this case, the footage underneath. Let me start with the input,
and I’m going to select the darkest part that I
can find, and, you know, this part is pretty
black, so I’ll do that. Now let’s do the same for input white, and now we just have to do
the same for output black and output white, except
I’ll select the blackest and whitest parts of the
target layer, in this case the, underlying footage. So, let’s see, I think
this is, this will work, and for the brightest, here, alright? Now, let’s turn back on
the levels and, done! Alright, so let me explain
real quick what happened here. Basically all we did
was remap the blackest and whitest points of the
picture so they matched the footage, and that stretches
all the colors in between so they match much better. And by blackest and whitest
points I of course mean all three RGB levels,
and it’s not going to always be a perfect match, in part because I selected
the colors by hand, and actually an improvement
that I want to make is to automatically find the
blackest and whitest points, but as it is, this works pretty well for most situations, really. I’ve used it a ton over
the last year or so. I also include a multiplier
in case you are to adjust the amount of levels
matching, so zero would be, don’t change anything,
and a hundred would be, matching the black and
white points perfectly. But you can set anything in
between, and even go negative, which matches the colors
in the opposite direction, or go about a hundred, which
exaggerates the adjustments. Some checks you might need
to do from time to time include adjusting the, adding
a saturation adjustment or, or you can input the input colors, and, you know, you can play with that, but this should take you 90% of the way. Anyway, I hope this helps
you, I know it has helped me match screens, signs, and all
sorts of footage tremendously, and I know my channel is,
it’s a bit of a mixture of different things, but
I’m working more of these After Effects tips videos,
so if you’d like to know when the next one comes out,
make sure the subscribe. And if you feel After Effects
is not taking advantage of your multi-core computer
when it comes to rendering, or if you have several machines that you’d like to hook up together to speed up your renders, take a look at my app,
it’s called Render Boss, links should also be in the description. Anyway, I hope that was helpful,
see you in the next video. Bye.
– Studies show that waiting for renders can
be dangerous for your health. Render Boss forces your
computer to open more threads, bossing it around to
render, render, render, and that’s not all, you
can add or remove threads as much as you like in
the middle of your render. But wait, there’s more. You don’t have to be limited
to a single computer. If you have several machines on a network, Render Boss can use them
all at the same time, even for video files. Tired of using the confusing command line to set multi-machine renders?
(beeping)

Photography Logo: Learn How to Design a Photography Logo in Photoshop [photography logo]

Photography Logo: Learn How to Design a Photography Logo in Photoshop [photography logo]


Grab a piece of paper and a pen and give your initial signature on it Take a picture on your phone and import that picture on your pc Open that picture in illustrator Then grab the pen tool and start creating a path on the picture It will take some time and some practice too Just give some stroke weight And after that it’s almost ready Select the path and go to object – expand click – OK Grab the direct selection tool and give some rounded corner Grab the type tool and write the other text Make some adjustment if need Now your signature type photography logo is ready THANK YOU GUYS LIKE SHEAR SUBSCRIBE