The LSAT Shouldn’t Be Easy | LSAT Test Prep | Blueprint LSAT

The LSAT Shouldn’t Be Easy | LSAT Test Prep | Blueprint LSAT


Why you don’t want the LSAT to be easy. So when you are studying for the LSAT,
you very well may hit a point where you go absolutely crazy
and get furious at the test because it all just seems way too hard. But if — or honestly when — that happens take a deep breath, go to like your zen place, and remember that that’s actually a good thing! If you’re watching this, you’re almost definitely taking the right steps to prepare for the test, but a lot of people out there are not like you. A lot of people think, “Hey I’m a smart person,
I don’t need to study, I’ll be fine!” And those people — lucky for you — are wrong. Certain parts of the LSAT, especially the logic games section, reward people who do some sort
of formalized study for the test. I mean in Logic Games if you don’t have
some sort of game plan up front that you’ve practiced,
most people are gonna crash and burn. Now you’re probably wondering why this
is good for you. the reason is that the LSAT is a curved test. It doesn’t just care how well you do alone it cares how well you do in relation to other people. So if the LSAT was a total walk in the park and everybody got everything right everybody would end up with a 150 our of 180. On the other hand if nobody did well and everybody missed everything again, everyone would still
end up with 150. So as somebody who is probably already studying you want other people to do that whole crashing and burning thing we were talking about earlier, because it makes it more likely for you to be on the favorable side of the curve. Now all right, maybe that sounds like
super bloodthirsty and brutal of me but hey — these are the facts people. So whenever you get in that, “OH MY GOD, the LSAT’s too hard, I’m gonna die!” state of mind, just remember all those suckers out
there who will be eating your dust and bumping your score up higher and higher.

LSAT Study Tip: Do it in the Morning | LSAT Prep | Blueprint LSAT

LSAT Study Tip: Do it in the Morning | LSAT Prep | Blueprint LSAT


Why should you study for the LSAT in the
morning? I know it’s horrifying! Why should anyone
do anything in the morning? I mean if i ran the world, honestly
nothing would be open until 1 pm and then it would close at about 5 am
when people should be going to sleep. I get it — mornings suck. Mornings are the universe’s way of
reminding you that life is nothing but a series of endless tiny annoyances building
on each other until one day you finally die. But anyway, the makers of the LSAT love mornings. They’re like those people who work at
coffee shops and try to make jokes when you are just clearly projecting to them
that you cannot be bothered by it. Whatever the reason, 3 of the 4 LSAT
administrations are at 8:30 in the morning So in a way, the LSAT rewards morning people. Now I know what you’re thinking — “I’ll just keep
doing me until a day or two before the test and then I’ll go to bed early that night
and handle the morning for once in my life and just be done with it,” and I wish that
it could work that way, but it doesn’t. The exact number varies from person to
person, but for most people it takes at least a week to adjust to a new sleep
schedule, so you can’t really expect to just wake up the morning of your test and be totally fine. Plus there’s a lot of research out there that suggests waking up early can benefit you in a
whole slew of different ways. Early risers tend to be more proactive, they
tend to have higher average college GPA’s and they tend to be more optimistic, which doesn’t hurt when you’re studying for a standardized test for 3 months. So it really might pay off to try forcing yourself up
for a few weeks and hitting the books early. Now if you are screaming inside listening to all this,
you do have one other option: The June test every year is given
in the afternoon at 2 pm so if you really can’t even fathom waking up before 11, what better way to start your summer
than with an afternoon of LSAT-ing?

Blueprint Success Stories: Jacob’s lofty goals

Blueprint Success Stories: Jacob’s lofty goals


My dream job is to be President of the United States. It’s a lofty goal, but someone has to do it right? Someone from my generation’s gonna do it. My name is Jacob, I got an 8 point score increase and a 167 on the June 2016 LSAT,
and I go to UCLA. If I could have a superpower it would be to freeze time. You could travel the whole world and not miss a second. I assume if I can freeze time I can walk on water too. I don’t know why but for some reason those go together. I knew I wanted to do a prep class. I thought a program that was LSAT-specific would be the best option, just because they’re experts. My instructor was Spencer Robbins. I literally feel like he could have been a stand-up comedian, I was laughing that hard at times. The teachers are sociable, funny people, and it doesn’t really feel like a classroom. You never felt overwhelmed and you also really felt like we knew it going onto the next step. A lot of people would say, “Two months is not enough.” I feel like two months was
absolutely enough with Blueprint. I don’t want to say I did it because of my parents but… I did grow up around politics and around policy and campaigns. My first goal as President would be to fund NASA. Let’s go explore the universe and see what’s out there.

Increasing LSAT Test Speed | LSAT Clock | Blueprint LSAT

Increasing LSAT Test Speed | LSAT Clock | Blueprint LSAT


Hey guys! My name is Albert Huber and I’m a veteran Blueprint instructor
here in Los Angeles. Today I’m gonna be talking about
increasing your speed on the LSAT. Students ask us all the time what the secret is to working faster through the test so we’re here to help! Now it might make mathematical sense
that a 35-minute section of about twenty-five logical reasoning questions
breaks down to roughly one and a half minutes a question, right? The thing is, imposing that one-size-fits-all
time constraint on yourself it’s going to lead to tons of avoidable mistakes. So, first rule of increasing your speed on the LSAT? Don’t talk about increasing your speed on the LSAT. Seriously. Imagine a juggler who starts with flaming swords before learning how to just toss a ball back and forth. Sure she’s going to be done with her
routine before the other jugglers but she’ll also be done with all routines
forever and ever and ever to come. So just like that juggler, the first you need to do is master accuracy. You should focus on getting questions correct with an effective and repeatable method. Now even if it takes you 7 minutes to get through a question, that’s fine! You’re learning how to approach it before you’re learning how to do it fast. After working like this for a while, you’re going to find that you’re moving faster
through the test than you were before and you’re just doing it naturally! And hey, would you look at that! You’re getting a ton of questions right! You’re moving through questions like an LSAT Master because you’ve earned the confidence that
knowing what you’re doing gives you. knowing what you’re doing gives you. When you have about an 80% accuracy rate on questions, then and only then should you start putting yourself under the rule of the oppressive stopwatch. But at that point, most of your timing work
was already done for you and you never had to think about in the first place. Simple right?

Blueprint Success Stories: Noelle’s long journey

Blueprint Success Stories: Noelle’s long journey


My favorite Harry Potter movie
would probably have to be Half-Blood Prince just because I love Draco Malfoy. Major bad boy appeal, and something
about the bleach blonde hair I’m probably slightly jealous of. I’m Noelle, I go to UCSB, and my score went up 19 points to 170. I didn’t score 170 on any of the practice tests. I got close! I got a 169 on a practice test,
but not that 170 that I wanted. And then I got it. The gates just opened up. Tears. I cried. So I was pretty much set on Blueprint I read a lot of Yelp reviews and they were all so positive. The Drills are my favorite part because
you can get through a lot really quickly so it makes you feel really productive. And they’re funny! Just a chuckle here and there, every hour so, it helps. I drove from Santa Barbara to CSU Northridge
every Tuesday and Thursday for about 12 weeks. I didn’t think I could find a class like Blueprint here,
and I didn’t. I didn’t want to skimp on myself. “I’m just gonna go full-out do everything I can. It might be rough, but it’s gonna be worth it in the end.” And it was.

Blueprint Success Stories: Jake jumps 15 points

Blueprint Success Stories: Jake jumps 15 points


We had a really good basketball team. One of the first games that we’re playing, we were crushing some team by like 40. I got so excited when I got the ball I just went up with it… and I didn’t like no one was around me, I’m like, “Yes! So easy. This is easy, this is good!” When I come down I realize it was my own net. We won, but um… I didn’t live that down. My name is Jake Williams, I went to Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island and my score increase was 15 points. I actually started playing hockey late. My dad tried to get me on skates
really young like most kids. That’s what happens in Montreal. Then I told him I wanted to be goalie, he was like, “No, that’s a terrible idea.” I just took to it and I stuck with it and I ended up getting a scholarship out of it. Favorite section of the LSAT was
definitely Logic Games. I think that’s pretty common for a lot of people. It’s fun, it’s like you can beat the game I still kind of do them once in awhile to this day just because… I’m a nerd. I like the fact that Blueprint only does LSAT. I like specialized and that’s what I found in Blueprint. Being a goalie is… I mean it shouldn’t
be an emotional rollercoaster but it was for me. It’s either you saved everything or you blew it. There’s no middle ground. I like that pressure a lot. I didn’t have any previous [LSAT] experience
at all before I took the class. It was fun and interesting. I wanted to do well on the LSAT,
and it worked out really well.

How Many LSAT Practice Exams Should I Take? | Blueprint LSAT

How Many LSAT Practice Exams Should I Take? | Blueprint LSAT


Here’s a familiar story: you take a practice LSAT and score
about 10 points short of your target. What do you do? You take another exam. Lo and behold your score is… about the same. So you take another one… and another one… … and ANOTHER one. Each time your score is barely moving upward — if at all maybe even downward. You get frustrated, you panic, you reconsider law school and look at brochures for that
clown college as a backup. It all starts piling up — why am I not
improving? What am I doing wrong?! The problem? You’re TESTING yourself
too much and not TRAINING enough. Practice Exams simply measure your performance. What actually leads to score improvement
is training, very different. Many people mistakenly believe that the
best way to improve is to test yourself over and over again, dozens of times But this is analogous to training
for a marathon by… well… just doing a bunch of marathons. You burn out, you hurt yourself, and you typically don’t improve all that much. Marathon training requires something more
and different than just running full length races repeatedly. “Fair enough,” you say, but how can you
train for the LSAT? First you need a coherent system so you can see connections between questions and focus on weaknesses. Have trouble with ‘sufficient’ questions? Don’t just wait for those to show up
on a timed test. Understand the common thread to all the
‘sufficient’ questions you’re missing. Also, review everything you do, no matter what. This is what enables you to spot
patterns in the first place. If you really want to practice timing
strategies, train with single sections By doing single sections, you can review
right after the 35 minutes, learn from your mistakes, fine tune your
approach, and go at it again! We’ve found that with practice exams only 6,
that’s right SIX are really necessary to become
familiar with the test pace and length. Doing much more than that
prevents you from actually training and gives the illusion of preparation. So remember — practice exams
only show you where you are now but training before and in-between
those exams will get you to where you want to be on test day.

How Long Do I Study for the LSAT? | LSAT Test Prep | Blueprint LSAT

How Long Do I Study for the LSAT? | LSAT Test Prep | Blueprint LSAT


It’s a question we get all the time at
Blueprint: How much time do you really need to
study for the LSAT? We’re fully aware that there are a lot of crazy theories out there. Some say you can cram for the test in a couple weeks while others maintain that a full year of study is the way to go. You could go crazy listening to all that
stuff — so don’t. First, you can’t cram for the LSAT, so
real improvement’s gonna take more than just a couple weeks. This is because the LSAT tests you on
process, not on a body of knowledge. On the LSAT you can’t regurgitate facts
that you memorized earlier. Instead you need to develop and refine the procedures they’re testing so you can repeat these processes
efficiently and reliably on test day. Nevertheless, this skill development does
not take a full year to execute. Instead the ideal time frame is between
two and four months. If you have a light course load in
school, work part-time, or otherwise able to devote full attention to the LSAT, two
months should just about do it. If you’re working full-time or more, or you have a tough class schedule this quarter or semester, that might push it into the four-month range. In any case, your schedule should be broken down into three distinct stages. Step One: develop general skills. In
other words build a foundation for thinking about the different parts of
the test. For logical reasoning, developing a consistent system for diagramming arguments and conditional statements. For reading comprehension, developing a system to tag passages and identify their structure. For logic games developing — you guessed it — a consistent system for modeling the different types of games. Step Two: develop advanced skills
and refine techniques This means attempting tougher versions
of logical reasoning question types, identifying secondary structural
elements in reading comp, and learning advanced techniques
in logic games to increase efficiency. Only after mastering these concepts with
accuracy and comfort do you move on to Step Three: timing and performance.
Only at this point should you begin to time yourself and further refine your strategies based on how you perform under timed conditions. Depending on your schedule you can
execute this game plan in two to four months. The result is that you’ll be ready to be
at your best when test day rolls around.

Blueprint Success Stories: Juliet’s 26 point increase

Blueprint Success Stories: Juliet’s 26 point increase


My favorite movie is definitely ‘The Little
Mermaid’. It taught me the importance of paying attention
to contracts and making sure that you know what you’re actually signing. And maybe hire a lawyer. My name is Juliet P and I increased my
score by 26 points and got a 170 on the September 2016 exam. I went scuba diving in Cancun. I didn’t expect it but I ran into some barracuda. I was scared for my life, but I’m just thankful
they weren’t great white sharks. My favorite part on the online course was probably
that you can rack up points. I really liked seeing myself rise from an Untouchable
to the Bodhi, my mindset was like, “This is actually really fun!” My least favorite section of the LSAT was
probably Reading Comprehension. I was an English major but Reading Comprehension
on the LSAT is just a whole new beast. There was a moment where it clicked. I realized, “Reading Comprehension is just
like Logic Games but in a written format.” It wasn’t daunting or intimidating at all! I’m really glad that I went with Blueprint. I basically became the real life Bodhi — I was enlightened.

LSAT vs. SAT | Which Test is Harder? | Blueprint LSAT

LSAT vs. SAT | Which Test is Harder? | Blueprint LSAT


Is the LSAT harder than the SAT? I get this question all the time and usually it comes from people who had a really great SAT score or a really awful SAT score and they want to see if they’re either so set and don’t need to study at all or like so doomed to fail that they
should just give up all hopes of law school and just become an accountant or
something else terrible. The reality is this: yes it’s true that three of the letters in “LSAT”
are S, A, and T but that’s about the only thing
these two tests have in common. I mean you remember the SAT – it’s like
half-devoted to finding the area of a triangle and half about knowing the
meaning of words most of which you’ll never use in college or the real world. Basically the SAT is a huge waste of time
and a rite of passage to make sure you really want to go to college. But believe it or not, the LSAT’s, like, kind of useful. Studies repeatedly show that the LSAT alone is a better predictor for success in your first year of law school than your undergraduate GPA alone. The reason for this might be that the
LSAT isn’t about a body of knowledge. It’s about certain ways of thinking that
you’ll need to use in law school. So it doesn’t test your ability to remember,
like, random math formulas or how to avoid split infinitives. Instead it tests your ability to implement
a certain way of thinking and to exercise a *very
particular set of skills*. So there’s some pros and cons to this: on
the one hand, if you hate memorizing vocab and lists of facts, you very well might
love the LSAT. But on the other hand, if the only way you
survived college was by making a stack of flashcards that’s as thick as all
seven Harry Potter books combined? The LSAT may not be your best friend. But the bright side is that this
is definitely a test that you can learn. Since all it does is test the same way
of reasoning over and over and over again all you have to do is learn that way of
thinking and you’ll be *so* chill. So is the LSAT harder than the SAT? I mean truth is – it’s just apples and oranges my friends.