Styling Hollywood | Official Trailer | Netflix

Styling Hollywood | Official Trailer | Netflix


Nothing is more glamorous
than walking the red carpet.
Unless you’re me!Bing!My name is Jason Bolden,
Creative Director for JSN Studio,
where we do interior design
and celebrity styling.
I’m Adair Curtis, Jason’s better half.I oversee the interior design,and while Jason is running his mouth,
I’m running our business. Where do you come up with this stuff?Our clients are real life superstars.Why am I getting actual chills though? This is your kitchen. -Wow!
-This is crazy, man. Oh, my God! Amazing! Women that we work with
are the epitome of black girl magic.But it’s definitely not easy.It’s the day before the Emmys.It’s a hole in the dress. You are no longer part of JSN Studio. We are done.We’ve never really heard aboutblack interior decorators
and celebrity stylists.
The demand is really high for us.You married a superstar. I did. You’re my Ivanka. Well, we getting a divorce.

Urban Sketcher Photoshop Plugin – Aquarelleum – Tutorial

Urban Sketcher Photoshop Plugin – Aquarelleum – Tutorial


Open your Photoshop (use only English version, MAC/PC)
CC2015.5, CC2017, CC2018, CC2019 and newer Download Aquarelleum from www.bit.ly/aquarelleum.
Unzip archive and find installer.jsx file Now drag-and-drop installer.jsx file in your Photoshop and follow the instructions Restart Photoshop and browse to Window>Extensions>Urban Sketcher PS Plugin That’s all! Plugin is ready for work To delete, click Uninstall Extension in top right menu You can also install the plugin in another way. Browse to File>Scripts>Browse…
and open installer.jsx file Follow the instructions and restart Photoshop Browse to Window>Extensions>Urban Sketcher PS Plugin Open your photo, image etc. And go to Step 1: Select focus area.
First click “New focus area” button or “Auto focus area” button If you click “New focus area”,
after you must select focus area by painting over your photo It’s very simple! Just paint over area you want to select Ok. Go to Step 2: Start sketching Please keep “Optimize image” turn ON to get best sketch results (recommended). It is for resize small/big
images, convert color modes to RGB 8bit and other improvement scripts Or turn OFF switcher, if you want to use original image settings. But note: image size must be between 3000-4000px, resolution 240-300dpi,
color mode RGB 8Bits, image must be set as the Background Click “Generate new sketch” to start sketching! It takes approximately 1-2 minutes… Ok, sketch is ready! Go to Step 3: Swicth modes Click modes buttons to switch between sketch mode presets:
Default (color mode), Urban mode, Sketch mode and Watercolor mode Step 4: Customize details You can correct color adjustments Or swith background paper textures Combine settings for best results Now let’s try “Auto focus area” (step 1) In this mode, you do not need to paint anything – panel will select it all.
But if you want, you can correct selection. Just paint more or less Also, you can correct Auto focus area After click “Generate new sketch” (step 2) It takes approximately 1-2 minutes… Now you can play with sketch modes and details (step 3 and 4) Browse to Window ->Layers You will see fully editable graphic elements in well organized layers and folders Turn on/off layers for a more or less pronounced sketch Or for more or less watercolor Turn on/off or scale or correct folders and layers you want to improve your results

8 Motion Graphic Tips for Beginners

8 Motion Graphic Tips for Beginners


Hello this is Riverside Studios and today and get a little over some
basic motion graphic tips. so first one is this pop effect. you’ll see here. this simply is
between 80 and 100 percent scale the simple go like one frame before the 100 percent and put in something like 110 percent and you get this interesting pop effect. the second tip is ColourLovers.com the link is in the description. It’s a site
where you can find Color Palletes what’s nice about this, is it gives you the hex values, which you can copy and paste into your program Also if that feels like your
cheating you can also search by color and you can see a whole bunch of different hues and what you can use and then use those hues to make a
palette and then I’ll this find a whole bunch of
different colours and save it for later projects The third tip is to use CGtextures.com The link is also the
description it gives you a lot of royalty-free images use Within your motion graphics and you can just download them and like right here I can just throw this onto this motion graphic Put it on top and scale it up. and adjust the opacity tip number four – use Epic Rap Battles of History really use it on Spotify can listen to
what you do much graphics up tip number five motion blur Motion Blur is pretty important this enables motion there for the entire
project and then you need to add it for each individual layer and i really suggest using motion blur
on anything layer that has movement Tip Number Six Easy Ease right now this is a linear movement however if you add easy ease to it by simply by clicking going to be easy ease on this will add a slowdown in the
beginning And a slow down at the end tip number seven Helvetica Nue Font Font and white line things I so the most important font to use that you’ll probably be using in most motion graphics is Helvetica Nue you any and to switching between using uppercase letters Bold Font, ultralight
font it just gives you a variety of what to use and you can really up your motion graphics by adding these little
white lines just moves I’ll move stuff around ’em till I get something that looks cool Number Eight Words Coming Out of Stuff so here’s my Riverside Studios logo you can see it’s coming out of this White bar there on the right this is pretty simple you just I’m just
using me a mask here and putting a key frame at the and the position the frame and wanted to be
anywhere it begins its movement and just moved it over to adjusts that hides it’s behind the white bar and one thing the make sure it is if
you’re using easy easy added to both the motion path and the position key frames you can use the same concept for having a object swipe over some text to reveal it Which is a cool effect Alright please subscribe and or at least watch my last video Slider Love

Using CSS: styling child elements

Using CSS: styling child elements


So far in our CSS, we’ve only been
targeting by element and when we do that it styles all the elements
the same way. But maybe we want to be a little bit more
specific. So let’s say, I want to target the
Brachiosaurus paragraph here, but not these two paragraphs up here. Looking in my HTML, I can see that these
two paragraphs are inside of a header element where the Brachiosaurus
paragraph is inside of a main element. So knowing that they’re inside of
different elements, I can style them differently. So, if I want to get the Brachiosaurus
paragraph, I know it’s inside of main, so I’m going to type main p. What this is saying is select every
paragraph that is inside of a main element. This is called a descendant selector. So in here we could just change the color
to be white like that. So I go refresh and you can see I’ve only
selected this paragraph here. I’ve selected only the paragraphs that are
inside of the main element. I can do the same thing for my header, so I could do header p background-color:
yellow. So there we go, I’ve changed just those
paragraphs now separately from this one, I’ve changed the bar, their background
color. But, you’ll notice that because I targeted
all the paragraphs inside of the head, header element, right here, it selected both of these paragraphs because
they’re both inside of the header element. Now, the difference though, if you look at them, this paragraph is
directly inside the header element where this paragraph is inside of
a div which is inside the header element. So we can target those a little bit
differently. So if I wanted to get just this paragraph
right here, I could go like this. I could type header div p and let’s change
the color to white. So this says, get every paragraph that is inside of a
div that is inside of a header. So if I go refresh, you’ll see it’s
getting this one right here. That’s one way to do it. The other way is because this paragraph is
directly inside of a header and there’s nothing surround it, surrounding
it, we can use a child selector. So if I was to type header>p that would
mean get any paragraph that is directly inside of a
header and not inside of something else. So I could change the color then to red. So there, I’ve selected just this
paragraph separately from this one. So I can either target multiple levels
deep, like this, or I can target what’s called a child selector, this right
here, the greater than means that the paragraph is directly inside of the
header and not inside of something else. Let’s, we’ll look at one more relational,
relational selector. Inside of our header, we can target ps
directly because using the child selector here, but we’re getting both of
those paragraphs, we’re getting both these here because
they’re both directly inside the header. But let’s say I only wanted to get this
paragraph and I wanted to style it differently from this
paragraph. Now, they’re both directly inside of the
header so the child selector doesn’t work. But the difference is that this paragraph
is right beside an h1. So because it’s beside an h1, I can style
that. So in here I can take h1 + p and do
something to it, background-color: red. Now this selector says, find every paragraph that is immediately
beside an h1. If I go and refresh, you can see I’ve
selected this paragraph right here. Let me change the color on that, too. So we have different ways of selecting
relational things. We have descendent selectors like this, we
have child selectors which are kind of like direct descendents, and then we have
sibling selectors or adjacent selector where the p is beside an
h1, and we can style that way.

6 Principles of Visual Design

6 Principles of Visual Design


In the last video, we initiated a transition
towards the world of design. In this video, you will learn a bit about the principles
of design. But first things first: what is design?
Design is about coming up with a plan to build both the aesthetics and the functionality
of an object or a system. It is also a language. For example, when concept artists draw a character,
it will not be used as it is in the game. The character design sketch is a plan or blueprint
that is meant to be used by other artists to create the final 2d or 3d character. It
establishes the look of a given character in a way that works with the game’s design.
So what’s the job of a designer then? Designers create systems for others. As I said, they
create both the aesthetics and the functionality of systems.
When we work for ourselves, we take the risk to write in a language that only we fully
understand. That is not the goal of a professional designer. If you want to become a game designer,
a visual storyteller, or a composer in the entertainment industry maybe, you will have
to learn to put your work at the service of others. This doesn’t mean that you can’t
pick a goal that is meaningful to you. You will still design the framework of an array
of experiences. But as a designer, you have to make it accessible to others.
The good news is: we have a language for that. The language of design. It’s a language
composed of what we call the elements, and the principles of design. The elements of
design are the raw material of our creations. They are a sort of vocabulary, a set of building
blocks. In the case of game assets, they are color and light, shapes, textures, etc. The
principles of design, on the other hand, are a form of grammar. They bring the elements
of design together into a coherent mix. The design grammar is partly common to all
forms of arts. Be it music scoring, development, sound design, writing, etc. Who has never
heard about rhythm in music? Repetition, or contrast? Those are principles of design.
Note that to get a good understanding of both the elements and the principles of design,
we have to study them separately. Just like when we learn a new language: we have to alternate
studying new words and studying grammar. But why are we looking at the principles of
design right now? Why not the elements first, may you ask?
Well, when we learn a language, this is true that we start with some basic vocabulary.
But I am pretty sure that most of you who are watching this video already have that
vocabulary. You have certainly already drawn some faces, characters, rocks, etc. Played
with colors and light a bit… you name it. The principles we are going to look at will
give us a solid foundation to build upon. You can see them a bit as verbs: with some
practice, they empower you to create many new coherent sentences, or paintings or characters
in that case. The principles of design give you tools to better analyze and filter parts
of pieces of art to study from. They give you the means to better dissect the art you
are going to look at. Every time you see a beautiful shot in a game
or a movie, it is thanks to the team’s understanding of the principles of design.
There are about 6 principles of design, depending on how we decide to categorize them. They
are all essential lenses we will use to analyze every single bit of our own creations. Although
we study them separately, they are supposed to be applied in synergy. Pretty much any
professional designer uses them all, all the time. Be it consciously or not.
Right now, I am going to give you a quick rundown of the 6 principles of design. It
takes time to get a good understanding and feel of both the principles and the elements
of design. And by time, I don’t mean just hours of practice: as with any language, you
have to be patient and let the concepts sink in slowly. So we will keep coming back to
them in future videos, whenever we have an occasion to do so.
The first principle is scale and proportion. Once we have a good grasp of the proportions
of any object in the real world, we can start playing with it. Here’s an example of that
principle in action. The designers of Asura’s Wrath decided to create a huge boss: Wyzen.
He is bigger than a planet. Put in perspective with the human sized Asura, we get an awesome,
mega epic scene. This choice dramatically accentuates the drama and tension when the
main character gets crushed by his opponent’s finger.
Playing with the inner proportions of a character or object is pretty straightforward. We can
lengthen or thicken parts of it. But how can we express the relative scale of objects with
one another? We mainly have 2 tools at our disposal to achieve that: overlapping elements
and repeating them. Note that you should always incorporate an
element of reference for the viewer to understand the relative scale of other objects in the
scene. Like a human being, a house… or the planet Earth!
The second principle we are going to talk about is repetition and contrast. In order
to make a scene coherent, you will have to repeat certain elements around your design.
For one, repeating minor elements like rocks or foliage will help your environment to look
consistent. Repeating elements like a symbol on an armor, or physical traits among a group
of characters will reinforce those elements to the eyes of the viewer.
Then, repetition is also a solid tool to create contrast: if you repeat a certain pattern
in your image, any unique element will pop out. You can easily see that when you have
a crowd surrounding an isolated character. What about contrast? Contrast is a straightforward
principle, as it boils down to the meaning of the word itself. That is to say that you
want to juxtapose opposing elements in your visual composition to intensify their unique
aspects. Next, let us talk a bit about balance, and
imbalance. All of the elements you add to your design, all of the objects have a certain
visual weight. This weight depends on their size on the canvas, but also on their color,
value and contrast. Your image’s composition doesn’t need
to be balanced. It doesn’t need to be symmetrical, or carefully weighted to get to a visual equilibrium.
Controlled imbalance can create a sense of tension, or intensify your shot’s emotional
strength. Our 4th principle is Emphasis. Using contrast,
unique shapes, strong colors or light, you can choose to attract the eye of the viewer
on a given part of your creation. The one part of your piece you decide to emphasize
will generally be its focal point as well. The previous principles help reinforce our
creation’s hierarchy. This is our 5th principle. You want to have important elements and less
important ones. On a painting, you generally want to emphasize one subject that tells your
image’s story. In a game, your characters are most of the time at the top of the visual
hierarchy. Then, there are your gameplay-related assets. And finally the background and other
effects are at the bottom of the hierarchy. In Ori and the Blind Forest, you can clearly
see how bright the character is compared to the background. The very surface of the floor,
where the player can walk, is strongly lit as well. Those elements are at the top of
the visual hierarchy. The player must see them to know where he can walk, where he is
and who he is controlling. In general, you will use other principles
of design to create a good hierarchy. Here, contrast. And repetition: the character is
unique, but the elements that make up the ground are being repeated. This helps the
character to pop even more. The last principle we are going to talk about
is unity, or harmony. Unity is achieved when you apply all of the other principles of design
together successfully. It is really your goal as a designer. A harmonious design does its
job beautifully, it’s that simple. We can take a look at the title screen of
The Last of Us for example. It is quite sober, not too complex. It focuses on one element:
the window. There is a clear contrast in terms of value, lighting, and color saturation that
reinforces this very window. The foliage, the curtains, as well as some barely visible
building in the background give us a sense of scale. The hierarchy of the scene is thus
pretty clear: the window is very central to the piece. Its placement creates a sense of
movement and of controlled imbalance. Which makes total sense, considering that the game
talks about a post-apocalyptic world. Alright, this was quick! My goal here is for
you to be aware that those principles of design exist, and that they are part of the essence
of any of your creations. Before we part ways, I just want you to note that those principles
are meant to be used as lenses. We can apply them at different levels of our creations:
on a single character taken alone, as well as on the same character within a whole composition.
If you want to learn more about the principles of design, Matt Kohr made a free video series
on the topic. He goes over the principles of design applied to visual arts one by one.
Link in the description below. As I said though, will be coming back to the
principles of design in future videos. I hope you like the video! If you did, don’t
hesitate to share it with your friends! You can also become a subscriber on this channel
are on social networks if you want to be notified whenever I release an article or a new video.
Thank you for watching…

Why to use CSS selectors instead of adding styles inline

Why to use CSS selectors instead of adding styles inline


At this point I’m pretty happy with what we’ve
come up with. This is very close to the design. So now it’s time to capture all of the style
changes that we’ve made into our file. So far we’ve made these changes in the browser
but as soon as we refresh these changes will be gone. I’m going to jump back to our text editor.
Now earlier on in this series what we did to add styles was use the style property.
So we’d do style, equals and then quotes and we’d put our styles right in there, and we
can do that now, let’s give that a shot. I’m going to jump back to the browser and
what I’ll do here is highlight all of the styles. So notice I’m starting from where
this bracket begins and ending this selection before the ending bracket, and then I can
right-click and copy and then I’ll jump back to the editor and I’ll paste right inside
this style section, and I’ll save this. Now we can jump back to the browser and refresh,
and you see that all of our changes persist because we have it in the style tag inside
of our code right here. Now the style property is very useful but in general it’s not the
way that we want to apply styles in our HTML, for a couple of reasons. The first is the one that should be kind of
obvious here, which is that as we get longer styles it becomes harder and harder to tell
what our HTML structure is. We could remove all of the extra lines in order to make this
all one line but then it would be even harder to read, and if you imagine HTML elements
nested in other HTML elements this is going to start to get a bit unwieldy. But that’s not the biggest reason why we don’t
use the style tag. The biggest problem is when we want to reuse styles. So let’s say
we have three heading two tags and we can simulate that by copying this H2 tag and pasting
it in here a couple times, so now we have three of them. I’ll save this and we’ll go
to the browser and refresh. So you’ll see qualities three times. Okay, all is good so far, right? Well let’s
say now we want to change the letter spacing in all three of these. Because we’re just
a little bit short of what we want and we’d rather extend it out a little bit, what will
we need to do? Well we have to go back into our code and
we’re going to need to change it in three different places: so letter spacing here,
letter spacing here and letter spacing here. Now that doesn’t seem like a huge deal because
we only have three headings and they’re all right next to each other. But when we’re done with this template the
H2 tags are going to be distributed throughout a whole bunch of other HTML code, and it’s
going to be a surprising amount of work trying to find all of the headings that use this
style in order to modify it. So ultimately we’ll end up using something
called a selector in order to tell the browser which elements get certain styles, instead
of putting the styles in-line with the element. Let’s do that. So if you remember from before
when we were explaining why we use the HTML head-body structure inside of our document
part of it was that our head is useful for other things besides just the title, and one
of them is for putting styles in it. So what we’ll start with is a starting style
tag, and we’ll just go ahead and end that as well, so we don’t forget, and then within
the style tag we’re going to use a selector. I’ll go ahead and type out the selector now
and then explain what it means. Okay, so what we have here is H2 which you
should be familiar with by now, it’s our heading two tag, and so we’re saying with this selector
that we want to apply any styles that are inside of these curly brackets to H2 tags.
We could put any tag here if we wanted and we can do a lot more with selectors which
you’ll see shortly in this series. So now, instead of having our styles here,
let’s cut out these styles and we’ll paste it inside this selector. Notice how everything
gets indented properly – this is another benefit of using an IDE, instead of a plain text editor. And now that we have this we can remove the
style tag from all of our H2s. Okay, let’s save it and jump back to the browser and refresh,
and you’ll notice that nothing changed here. Down here, instead of all of the styles appearing
in element dot style, we’re seeing it inside of this selector, and we can demonstrate very
quickly how powerful it is to be using a selector instead. So let’s say we wanted to change the color
to blue. So I’m going to highlight the value and type in blue, and you can see that the
styles change across all of our headers at once. So hopefully you can see the power of switching
from using the style property to using the style tag and specifying selectors to apply
styles too. Now like I said we can do a lot more with selectors and we’ll need to in just
a few steps in order to get what we need. But for now this is pretty good.

Graphic design major describes her internship in Ireland

Graphic design major describes her internship in Ireland


I’ve been an artist ever since I could hold
a crayon. In high school I’d never really done anything like, quote-unquote graphic
design-related, and I knew that pursuing studio art or fine arts just wasn’t for
me and so, I think graphic design is a great way to visually communicate with
people and to kind of give a purpose to my art. My name is Emilie Jenkins and I am a graphic design major here at University of the Pacific. I had a graphic design internship in
Dublin, Ireland this summer and I got to work with a small design firm there in
Dublin on some projects for two months. And two of the main projects were with
the National Gallery of Ireland. So, the first was an exhibition that I helped
put on and that was about nail art and it was called “Renailssance,” so kind of a
spin-off of Renaissance paintings that the gallery put on two different finger
nail acrylic nails and so we helped do an installation with the artists that
were involved with that. And then the second big project was for an initiative
that the National Gallery is actually doing right now and basically it’s a
program to help get young adults into the gallery. And so I was able to work on
a branding and design system for the program. So, I’m currently living my dream here at
Pacific. The small campus size – for me, that’s what I need as a student to
thrive. And then also the wonderful program that is offered here in terms of
graphic design, I think that’s what really just sold it to me. you

Meet Graphic Design student Jershon Moodie

Meet Graphic Design student Jershon Moodie


(funky music) Hi, I’m Jershon Moodie,
I’m a graphic design student, and I’m born and raised
in Toronto, Ontario. I always liked art and
drawing when I was younger, and just in high school, the one course that gravitated towards me was combined communication design course. It was a mix of graphic
design and videography, and I felt that was only type of work I can focus and dive into, and like, work I really
wanted to excel at. My style of art actually is a mix. I draw interest from my
daydreams, my likes of music, and the different types of art I like. I just like to put it all together. Pretty much what I
daydream about in general. I gravitated towards
photography, and motion graphics. I’ve designed my own tattoo, enjoy doing illustrations and drawings. Just, I found so many creative outlets. My experience at OCAD,
I’d say is life-changing, ’cause when you start at high school, and you’re just kind
of following that herd, it just doesn’t really, you don’t really get anything. And then OCAD’s kind of opened my eyes, working with different professors. Its been an amazing experience, and like, overall, at the end of this, I’d like to be a creative director. (funky music)