Business Blueprint Success Story – Danielle Chiel

Business Blueprint Success Story – Danielle Chiel


I’m Danielle Chiel. I work in the fashion industry and I design produce and distribute high-end quite stylish hand-knitted garments. I just had this massive passion for knitting. I always wanted to take it global, to be on the catwalks of the world. I knew that I had to find a mentor if I was going to get to where I wanted to go. I’ve subscribed to the Business Blueprint newsletter I guess it must have been. I just opened it and read it and I thought this sounds really interesting I think I’ll go along and see what it is. There is no information that cannot be gleaned from this group. I’ve met fantastic mentors support people everything you need to grow a business. Web people, marketing people friends who can talk about different ideas people who you’re trying to sort stuff out with. These people that are on your side and filling in all the gaps along the way of knowledge that’s what Business Blueprint has helped me do One of the first things I learned early on was to build a website on an open source platform but I had no clue about any of that. They always have one person speak all day and it was Marcus Tarrant and it was how to write a business plan in a day and it opened lots of doors for me. I did meet somebody I emailed him that business plan and he said this is great I’ll introduce you to a colleague of mine in India. The selling of them Business Blueprint again has been totally invaluable. Dale had this recent mastermind it was the most amazing thing I’ve ever experienced. We went into depth in anybody’s business and from the minute I arrived there it was seriously amazing. I’ve been the opening brand of AWI they have parades around Australia. That’s the Australian wool market innovation They’ve been incredibly supportive of what I’m doing so I’m the opening brand still to this very day and they put this garment for me from a regular basis and they’re so supportive. I’ve been in Grazia magazines Done Sydney Fashion Week and I’ve done Hong Kong Fashion Week, New York maybe ski resorts in Canada and then once I’ve got that established of course I’ll go the other part of the world cause it was a global business from the day I started there was no question of keeping it narrow and I’m just grateful just love it to bits and there’s no looking back you

Business Blueprint Testimonials

Business Blueprint Testimonials


I’ve been in business for 26 years and there’s never been anything like this. This is the start to get my thing growling. Through Blueprint I’m gaining so much expertise and advice and direction. That for me myself there’s no way that I can live come close to find fraction off. It’s the exact recipe what I actually need It gives you the structure, it gives you guidance, it gives you the knowledge.. And it gives you the opportunity to actually talk about your business with other like people people in the same boat. Lovely young family, so it allows you to sure have young family and grow my business as well. The quality of the speakers is phenomenal. The experts are fantastic, they give you time. They give you everything they know, they don’t hold back. The quality of the experts are sensational. Through the program I found that I even get the right context. In the last 90 days I’ve probably achieve more than I’ve done in the last 12 monts. It was the propaganza, it’s a perfect solution to the problem I had. And I know in the next 90 days with the process that I’m going to set into place that I can at least top up my business. You’ll get a fantastic momentum from this business blueprint. It’s very systemized, it’s very easy to follow, and it’s very easy to be skeptically scalable. It exceeded my expectation to the point.. where I would highly continue to highly recommend this program.

This Ancient Mammal’s Ears Were Built for Chewing

This Ancient Mammal’s Ears Were Built for Chewing


[♪ INTRO] Last week in the journal Nature, researchers
announced that they’ve found a new fossil that might
help us understand one of the most unique features of mammals:
our ears. Also, the little guy is, like, really cute… so there’ that. Called Jeholbaatar kielanae, this animal was
found by paleontologists in Northeast China. It lived in the Cretaceous period, about 120
million years ago, and it likely ate things like bugs and plants. It was pretty small, not much bigger than
a mouse. Though technically it wasn’t a rodent. It’s what’s known as a multituberculate, a different mammal group that was pretty successful until they died out about 34 million years
ago. So that’s neat — it’s always fun to
find new fossil species. But this fossil was also special because its ear bones had been preserved. Besides signature adaptations like producing
milk or having fur, mammals — including humans
— are also have unique, complex middle ear bones. These three little bones, called the malleus,
incus, and stapes, help transfer sound from the eardrum to the
cochlea. Reptiles, in contrast, typically only have
one bone in their ears, the stapes. Thanks to our unique set-up, mammals have
superb hearing, able to detect much higher frequencies than
other land animals. But these bones are also a bit of an evolutionary
mystery. We know two of them, the malleus and incus, evolved from bones in our jaws. But eventually, they moved to our ears, and we don’t fully understand why. Just because they’re helping us hear better
now doesn’t mean that was the original evolutionary
pressure that got them moving. And fossil evidence suggests this actually
happened more than once, independently each time. Researchers have proposed a few ideas for why middle ears evolved. Perhaps they really did improve hearing right
from the get-go. Or maybe the moving bones were a side effect of larger brains reshaping the skull. But the evolution of Jeholbaatar’s ears may actually have had more to do with its
diet. Because Jeholbaatar is so old, scientists
were able to spot one bone seemingly caught in
transition from being part of the jaw to being part of
the ear. Analyzing the shape and placement of the bones, the scientists came to the conclusion that
the shift wasn’t a result of the brain changing the
shape of the skull or other ideas. Instead, by moving up towards the ears, the bone was essentially getting out of the
way of its chewing. This let Jeholbataar move its jaws in a unique, forwards-and-backwards motion. This improved grinding power, and made it
easier for the animal to hear over the sound of its
own noshing. This doesn’t necessarily explain how our own middle ears developed. Jeholbaatar’s group is a cousin to our mammal
group, not an ancestor, and we don’t chew the same
way they did. But it does represent an interesting new hypothesis for how jaw bones can become ears. And it might help explain why multituberculates were so successful for so long. In more modern news, scientists publishing
in the journal Science Translational Medicine have found
that starting HIV treatment within hours of birth may help
HIV-positive newborns. HIV can be passed from an infected parent to their unborn child, and it can be fatal
or cause serious, irreversible damage to the baby’s immune
system. The World Health Organization recommends that doctors start treatments that can control
the infection within just weeks of birth. This new study suggests starting treatment
even earlier, within hours rather than weeks, might be even
better. The researchers, working in Botswana, started
treating a group of ten HIV-positive newborns with
antiviral drugs just hours after they’d been born. They then tracked the children over the course
of two years, taking periodic blood samples and comparing
them to another group of ten babies who received the currently accepted treatment regimen. The blood samples allowed the scientists to
examine traces of the virus within the DNA of the
children’s immune cells. They were able to watch how the infection evolved and changed, as well as how their
bodies were responding to the infection. They found that starting the antiretrovirals
earlier resulted in better immune system responses
and signs of a reduction in something called the viral
reservoir. Typically, when the virus infects a cell,
it hijacks the cell’s machinery and starts producing
new copies of itself. However, some cells go into a resting state
instead, where they don’t produce new copies of the
virus. Those resting cells are effectively hidden from medicines targeting the virus. These cells can lay dormant for years before
turning back on. This hidden cache of the virus makes up the
viral reservoir. By peeking at the traces of viral DNA in immune
cells, the scientists could essentially gauge the
size of the reservoir. They found that shortly before the babies
turned two, the ones that got the earlier treatment had
very low levels when compared to the infants that received
the standard regime. The scientists think follow-up studies might
find even more beneficial effects later on in life. Now, you might think it seems obvious that more medicine earlier is better. But when people’s lives are on the line, scientists have to show that treatments are
effective. This study seems to do that. There are still some barriers, though. The study was pretty small. Starting HIV treatment earlier on a large
scale could represent a huge logistical challenge and require innovations in diagnosis and infrastructure. Remember, we’re talking about catching it
within hours, sometimes in places with very limited resources. But these results show that this change could
have real, dramatic benefits for some of the world’s
most vulnerable populations. And if nothing else, the scientific insights
from this study, about precisely how the newborn immune system responds to the virus, could help optimize
or tailor future treatments. Thanks for watching this episode of SciShow
News, which was brought to you with the help of
our amazing President of Space, Matthew Brant! You too could become President of Space by joining our awesome community of supporters over on patreon.com/scishow. AND before you go, we want to show you these
neat lunar calendars now available over on DFTBA.com! They’ll help you keep track of the phases
of the moon for all of 2020, so you can stay astronomically
informed. You can grab one now. [♪ OUTRO]

Changing the Blueprints of Life – Genetic Engineering: Crash Course Engineering #38

Changing the Blueprints of Life – Genetic Engineering: Crash Course Engineering #38


Engineers like making things better. From mechanical parts to electronic circuitry:
if it can be improved, somewhere an engineer is
working on making it more useful to the world. Of course, the goal of all this is to make
our lives better. But there’s another way in which life, in
the sense of living organisms, can be tailored
to our benefit. At the boundaries of engineering and scientific
research, genetic engineers are working with
the very blueprints of life: DNA. By editing DNA and the genes contained within
it, the field of genetic engineering is allowing us to
change the nature of living beings. That can sound a little scary, and it’s
certainly not without its controversy. But done correctly, it could help us create more food,
design new materials, treat or cure diseases, and even
improve people’s lives before they’re born. [Theme Music] The world of genetic engineering revolves around DNA: a molecule found in nearly all the cells of
most living things, which governs how those
cells grow and function. At its simplest, it consists of two, long sugar
phosphate strands that spiral around one
another in the famous double helix formation. And it’s what links those two spirals together
that determines the genetic content of DNA. Four types of molecules, called bases, make up
the biological code that stores information on the
structure of cells and how they operate. The sequence of those bases makes up
the organism’s genes. And if the organism reproduces, it passes
on some or all of those genes. There’s a lot of cellular machinery that goes into
translating the code from DNA into the proteins that
carry out different functions within a living being. But as you probably know, the end result is that
different genes produce different characteristics
in different living things. Through millions of years of evolution and genetic
inheritance, differences in DNA are why a tiger has
stripes but a jaguar has spots, or why sunflowers and roses have
different types of petals. And humans have been tinkering with that
DNA for thousands of years – long before
we even knew it existed. The most widespread example is the food we
obtain from crops. People have selectively cultivated crops and
bred them to be bigger, yielding more food. That’s essentially the same as picking crops
with the right genes. We’ve also tried to make them more resilient
to problems like diseases or a lack of rainfall. As for animal DNA, we bred wolves into domesticated
dogs more than 10,000 years ago. So in some ways, genetic engineering has gone
on for millenia. But one of the pioneers of modern genetic
engineering was American geneticist Norman
Borlaug. In 1944, Borlaug was hired by the International
Maize and Wheat Improvement Center to, well,
improve maize and wheat. Wheat is the third most-consumed cereal crop
in the world, so improving its yield would have
a huge impact. Borlaug and his team tried some traditional
crop breeding techniques to make wheat more
resistant to diseases like stem rust, which is caused by a fungus that shrivels
the stems of plants and can even kill them. And to an extent, they were successful, but
the new disease-resistant wheat plants came
from wheat that had long, thin stems. The new crops inherited those traits, too,
which caused them to fall over, which interferes with their growth and can
reduce the final yields of the crops by up to 50%! So, Borlaug and his colleagues used their
background in genetics to cross-breed the new wheat with a shorter, Japanese
variety that was more resistant to falling over – a trait that they successfully introduced into
the disease-resistant kind. Wheat that doesn’t fall over might not sound
like the most amazing of accomplishments. But Borlaug’s wheat was developed at just
the right time to prevent a catastrophic famine
from happening in India and Pakistan. In 1962, Borlaug and his fellow scientists introduced
their new wheat to those countries, doubling the crop
yields in the region over the next decade. The achievement became known as the “Green
Revolution.” As a direct result of Borlaug’s work, it’s
estimated about 300 million people were
rescued from starvation, and he was awarded the Nobel Peace
Prize for his work in 1970. So genetic engineering has already changed
the world for the better in significant ways. And today’s techniques give genetic engineers
an even more accurate and powerful toolkit for
tackling other challenges. In addition to addressing food shortages,
we could tweak the development of certain
plants for the production of biofuels, like ethanol derived from corn or
genetically engineered algae. In fact, algae can be engineered to produce
more than just fuel. If we can edit the right genes, we could create
large amounts of what are known as diatoms. Diatoms are special forms of algae with cell
walls made of silica. They’re literally living in glass houses! That special property gives diatoms lots of
applications in nano-engineering. They can be arranged onto surfaces to
produce biosensors, used to detect explosives,
or sent to deliver drugs inside the body. Genetic engineering could help synthesize
and manipulate diatoms more efficiently. And the medical benefits aren’t limited to delivering
drugs – genetic engineering could also be used to
produce medications in the first place. Certain kinds of bacteria produce enzymes – proteins
that speed up chemical processes – which can, in turn,
produce the chemicals used in pharmaceutical drugs. For example, the enzyme P450 is used to
create drugs for cancer treatment, but it’s
naturally produced by plants. By inserting the genes of a P450-producing plant into bacteria, researchers can create factories of genetically engineered bacteria that generate P450 in greater amounts. This type of strategy can make the drug production
process much more efficient – a similar method is
already used to produce insulin, for example. Even better than treating diseases would be
stopping them from happening in the first place. Which brings us to one of the more controversial
uses of genetic engineering: genetic treatments
for unborn animals, including humans. Certain diseases are caused by issues in an
organism’s DNA. Mutations happen when there’s a glitch in
the DNA-copying process and the base pairs
in the gene aren’t transcribed perfectly. In humans, for example, mutations can lead to
heart conditions like hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which thickens some of the muscles in the
heart, stopping it from pumping blood efficiently
and forcing the heart to work harder. If we could edit the DNA in an embryo to fix
a mutation or delete a carrier gene for a disease, it would prevent the disease from being
there when the person was born and grew up. On a genetic level, it’s like removing an
entire disease. Of course, many are concerned that genetic engineering
would be used to modify humans for other traits, from
the color of their hair and eyes to their intelligence. And whether or not that’s something we want
to do as a species is still being debated. But modern methods are far from delivering that
kind of control, while certain diseases are already
being tackled with current techniques. So genetic engineering has an enormous amount
of potential. But the real challenge comes from how we actually
chop and change genes. There are a few different ways geneticists do this,
but two breakthrough techniques have blown the doors
open in genetic engineering over the last decade: Optogenetics and CRISPR. Optogenetics involves modifying cells to make
them sensitive to light – brain cells, for example. Understanding the human brain is an enormous
challenge, one that the National Academy of Engineering
in the US has made one of their Grand Challenges for
the 21st Century. And one of the major obstacles is that we still
don’t know exactly what each cell in the brain does. Since the human brain has certain structures similar
to those in other animals – especially mammals – studying the brains of those animals
can help build a better model of our own. Essentially, we need to be able to turn individual brain cells on and off and see how that affects an animal’s behavior to help understand how neurons work together throughout the body. Changing the variables and measuring the outcomes
– that’s the heart of scientific testing. Brain cells have certain proteins on their surfaces
called ion channel receptors, which are chemical
channels into the cell that act like switches. They activate or deactivate brain cells when
a chemical, like a neurotransmitter, hits them. Here’s where it gets clever. Viruses are usually bad news for the organisms
they’re being hosted in. Certain viruses can attack a cell’s DNA
and insert rogue bits of genetic code, making
the cell malfunction. But because some viruses can introduce DNA
to cells, they can also be put to good use
for genetic engineering purposes. For example, viruses modified to carry certain bits of
DNA can give a cell light sensitive proteins, called
opsins, embedded in its ion channel receptors. Do that to brain cells in, say, a rat, and you can turn
those cells on and off by beaming pulses of light directly
to the cell using fiber optic cables. Researchers have already used this technique
to study the motion circuits in the brains of mice,
even controlling their motion. They’ve also manipulated cells that govern
sleep in fruit flies, waking them up and putting
them to sleep with flashes of light. Both the motor cortex in mice and the sleep cycle
in fruit flies have parallel structures in humans, so optogenetics offers a powerful way to
model human brain physiology. Another star genetic engineering technique uses
chunks of bacterial DNA called Clustered Regularly
Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats. To avoid that mouthful, the technique is referred
to simply as CRISPR editing. CRISPR can edit DNA in a way that’s easier
to customize, and can both remove particular
genes from a cell and add new ones. It relies on on a defense mechanism found
in bacteria to defend against viruses. Bacteria like E. coli produce certain proteins
that fight off viruses attacking the cell. When they succeed in fighting off the invaders,
enzymes in the cell actually take parts of the virus
DNA and store it within the cell. If another virus attacks later on, the bacteria produce special attack enzymes, known as Cas9, that carry around those stored bits of viral genetic code like a mug shot. When Cas9 enzymes come across a virus, they
see if the virus contains genetic information that
matches the mug shot. If it’s a match, the Cas9 enzyme chops up
the virus’s DNA to neutralize the threat. These mechanisms are exactly what genetic
engineers need: the ability to store and recognize portions of
genetic code on a microbiological level, and to
cut DNA and add parts of it where needed. So, with CRISPR-Cas9, genetic engineers have
an incredibly versatile toolkit for editing genes in living beings. So, among other things, CRISPR could help
cure diseases like cancer, sickle cell disease,
and certain kinds of muscular dystrophy. In theory, all you have to do is remove the
mutations and put in the correct, healthy
DNA sequence. There are lots of other approaches genetic
engineers can use, too, but CRISPR is one of the most
popular ones being used in research right now. Still, CRISPR is far from perfect in its current
form. Changing DNA isn’t consequence-free, and if done
incorrectly, it can even cause the very genetic diseases
and mutations researchers want to cure. So there’s a long way to go before we’re
fully genetically engineering humans on the
DNA level. But in the future, techniques like these may lead to cures
for all kinds of diseases, and like so many fields of
engineering, improve a lot of people’s quality of life. In this episode, we looked at genetic engineering. We saw that DNA was the underlying mechanism
for how genes are inherited by living things and how
it determines an organism’s features. We saw how selective breeding can improve agricultural
practices, and the potential DNA-level engineering could
have on other fields of engineering. Finally, we saw how optogenetics and CRISPR
have opened up new ways for genetic engineers
to change the DNA inside living cells. In our next episode we’re gonna be combining
two awesome things: food & engineering. Crash Coruse Augmented Reality Poster
available now at DFTBA.com Crash Course Engineering is produced in association
with PBS Digital Studios, which also produces
Deep Look, a show that explores big scientific
mysteries by going very, VERY small. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible
world, from eye popping mantis shrimp to blood
sucking mosquitos. Check it out at the link in the description. Crash Course is a Complexly production and
this episode was filmed in the Doctor Cheryl C.
Kinney Studio with the help of these wonderful people. And our amazing graphics team is Thought Cafe.

QGIS tutorial: Earth Engine plugin pre-releasee [EN]

QGIS tutorial: Earth Engine plugin pre-releasee [EN]


Hello, I am Mr.M from GIS4Dev In this video I will talk about Earth Engine for QGIS Before I start don’t forget Subscribe to my channel to get a new information about GIS This is a pre-release version Once you installed plugin in QGIS You can access dataset from Earth Engine By write Earth Engine script In QGIS python editor and execute it Let ‘s me show you This example I will show you OSM from OpenLayer plugin Then I will access Landsat 8 and Sentinel 2 datasets From Earth Engine Before I tell you how to install pre-release version I will talk about QGIS Earth Engine plugin This is QGIS Earth Engine plugin official website I am creating this video December 1, 2019 At this time current version is 0.0.1 And It not release yet This page give example about how to use this plugin If you would like to install pre-release version You can download file below this video And following this video step by step firstly you need to install site package Go to python 3 in QGIS folder In my case, It located in C: drive Program files> QGIS 3.0>Apps>Python37 Lib>site-packages And open my file that I gave you below this video site-packages folder Copy all items in this folder paste on the left side Click “Continue” for allow permission to copy to this folder Secondly, Install Earth Engine plugin In QGIS click on setting menu User Profile and click on “Open Active Profile Folder” Close QGIS Click on python If in your computer doesn’t have plugins folder Just create folder and give named “plugins” Click on “plugins” Copy “ee_plugin” folder That I have already gave you Right click and paste into plugin folder Lastly, Enable plugin and authentication to Earth Engine Open QGIS again and click on “plugins” Manage and Install plugin… Click on “Installed” This is a new plugin google earth engine Chcekbox to enable this plugin It will launch website To authentication with Google Earth Engine Python Authenticator Login by your earth engine account This page asked you to allow permission in 2 things. One, Google Earth Engine and two, Google Cloud Storage Click on allow button It will give token Copy this token Go back to QGIS Paste token to fill in this textfiled Then click “OK” Close this window Now you can use this plugin Click on python Click on this button Import module of class from Earth Engine plugin Type from ee_plugin import map And click execute If you don’t see any error it mean this plugin works So anyway This is just pre-release version It might have some bug If you have any question you can write don’t in a comment box Don’t forget like, comment, share and subscribe to my channel Bye bye, Sawasdeekrub.

How To Create a Fake Blueprint Effect in Photoshop

How To Create a Fake Blueprint Effect in Photoshop


How To Create a Fake Blueprint Effect in Photoshop welcome back to psdesire photoshop tutorials youtube channel. In today’s tutorial I’m going to take you through the process of creating a blueprint effect in Adobe Photoshop. We’ll use some built in Photoshop filters to produce the basic outlines from a source photograph, then mix in some grid patterns and textures to enhance the realism. first goto adjustments panel and select solid color. choose a dark blue color. In order to add a grid to the blueprint, we first need to make a pattern swatch. Create a new document at around 80x80px in size. This size may vary depending on the scale of your document. Take rectangular shape tool and draw a vertical line. Duplicate the shape and move it to other end of the document similarly add lines at top and bottom as it looks like a thick outline border. then go to Edit>Define Pattern. Give it a descriptive name such as Blueprint Grid Pattern. Close the document and return to the blueprint effect. Create a new blank layer and Fill it with black. scale down the layer by 25% Double click the layer to open layer style dialog and add a pattern overlay. then choose the newly created outlined boxed grid pattern. reduce the pattern scale and also opacity Again open layer style dialog and this time add stroke Change the blending mode of the grid layer to Screen The realism of this blueprint effect tutorial all depends on the base photograph we have to work with. Duplicate the base image and drag it above all layers Go to Image>Adjustments>Desaturate to remove the colour from the image, making it black and white. Then go to Filter>Stylize>Find Edges to generate the basic outlined look that forms the blueprint effect. Blueprints are mostly recognised as a light coloured drawing against a dark blue background, so go to Image>Adjustments>Invert to switch the colours around. If you look closely at your artwork, you may notice some white seaming occurs we can fix that using levels adjustment layer. Adjusting the black and white point levels to get clearer line edges and now no white seaming particles in the
effect. Change the blending mode of the image layer to Screen to render the black background transaprent, leaving just the white outline against the blue background. Now select transform tool and scale down the blueprint design layer Edges of the blueprint line is very thin so move the white Output Levels slider to the left to bring back the whites until it appears subtly over the image. i want to finish the effect off with a dirty paper texture, we can get one of these type of royalty-free paper textures from google search. Drag it into the document & place where u will find it looks good, Change the blending mode to Screen to allow the grungy paper texture double click on the layer to get the layer options panel. we want to preserve the highlights so drag the black triangles to the right. Hold Option or Alt Key clicking on the triangles splits them to feather the blend. all layers and effects are editable so we can adjust any layer any time. Here is before and after The final result is a great looking blueprint effect with a hand drawn appearance, along with a subtle grid pattern, creases, stains and folds that add to the realism. Thanks for watching! If you enjoyed
this video tutorial be sure to subscribe to our channel. post a comment, click thumbs up, like and share to
get more videos. see you again in next tutorial.

Ray Kurzweil | Our Brain Is a Blueprint for the Master Algorithm | Singularity Hub

Ray Kurzweil | Our Brain Is a Blueprint for the Master Algorithm | Singularity Hub


(calming instrumental music) – Well I think actually there
are some basic principles to how human thinking works. My last book, “How to Create a Mind”, which came out in 2012, which resulted in me
being recruited to Google, I practiced those ideas, talked about how human neocortex works, it’s outgrowth of a thesis I have had actually for 50 years because I wrote a paper when I was 14 or 15 in 1962, and won a science contest to
Westinghouse Talent Search. Now the intel inside this
talent got to be present content and I described human
thinking as consisting of modules of neurons, each module can recognize a pattern, and the basis of human thinking
is pattern recognition. And those patterns are
actually sequential. And they’re in one direction. And I gave a lot of evidence for this. For example, try to recite the alphabet. Now, most of you can do that fast. Okay well, recite it backwards. You probably can’t do that, unless you learned that as a new sequence. It’s a pretty trivial transformation, and yet we can’t do it. So we have different hints as
to how the human brain works. In recent years, it’s been an explosion of neuroscience evidence. For example, the European brain
reverse engineering project has identified modules of
about 100 neurons each, and since the neocortex
has 30 billion neurons, that means 300 million modules, and they all are pretty much the same. They have the same structure, the same organization within them. And there’s no plasticity, no change, within that module for your entire life. Despite the idea that your brain is constantly rewiring itself. There is plasticity, constant
rewiring between the modules, and each module is recognizing a pattern. We can see the axons coming
in from other modules that are feeding the sequential input that represents the pattern,
that this module will learn. So it’s a hierarchy of patterns. This pattern is based on a hierarchy of patterns and the modules below it. And each one of those has input from modules below it, and it’s
a very elaborate hierarchy. And biology, biological evolution evolved this hierarchical structure in the brain, so that it can understand and learn the hierarchical structure of the world, because the world is
organized hierarchically. The neocortex emerged 200
million years ago in mammals; only mammals have a neocortex. And it was a thin structure, the neocortex means new rind, and there was about. In the first mammals, which were rodents, it was about the size of a postage stamp, and just as thin as a postage stamp, and it wrapped around
the walnut-sized brains of these early mammals, but it was capable of
a new type of thinking. You could invent new behaviors, non-mammalian animals, like reptiles, that didn’t have a
neocortex, couldn’t do that. They have fixed behaviors. Didn’t help them that much actually because the environment
changed very slowly and could take 50 thousand years for there to be an environmental
change that would require a new behavior, and over
the 13 thousand years, these non-mammalian animals could evolve using normal Darwinian
evolution, a new fixed behavior. But then something happened
65 million years ago. It was a sudden catastrophic
change to the environment; we call it the crustacean
extinction event, and that’s when mammals
overtook their ecological niche. That’s when the neocortex
actually showed its capability. And then biological
evolution then grew it. Mammals now, instead of
being just little rodents, got bigger, their brains got
bigger, at an even faster pace, taking up a larger fraction of their body. And the neocortex got
bigger even faster than that and developed these curvatures and folds. If you look at a primate brain, it’s got these characteristic curvatures, so it now takes up 80% of the brain. Then something else happened,
two million years ago. If your remember, two million years ago, we were walking around; we
didn’t have these big foreheads. So humanoids came along
with a big forehead. And that houses the frontal cortex. And up until recently, it was said “Well, the frontal cortex does “such qualitatively different things, “it must be organized differently. “It must have a different
method, a different algorithm.” I make the case, and I
think the neuroscientists coming around to this view, it really was just an additional
quantity of neocortex. Well, so what did we do with
that additional quantity? Well, we were already
doing a very good job of being primates, so we put it at the top of the neocortical hierarchy. So this hierarchy that I
mentioned now got bigger. As you go up the hierarchy, things get more general, more
intelligent, more abstract. The very bottom, I can tell
that that’s a straight line. At the top, I can tell that’s funny, that’s ironic, she’s pretty. So that additional hierarchy that we got two million years ago was the enabling factor for us to invent language, and art, and science, and music. Every human culture we
every discovered has music. No primate or any other animal has music. That came from this additional neocortex. And I make the case in my
book, “How to Create a Mind”, what the algorithm is,
of each of these modules. They all have the same algorithm. So a lot of people like to say, “Oh, the brain is so complex, “it’s the most complex
thing in the universe”; that may be true, but it has
a regular repeating structure. Each of these 300 million
modules is basically the same. Now they self-organize
into these hierarchies, and each module discovers a pattern, and learns it, remembers
it, and can recognize it, even in a different context,
so it’s very good at metaphor. And I describe my thesis on how this works as we continue doing more
brain reverse engineering, we will refine that model, but I’ve been working with this model, and we find that it can
in fact master things like language, not yet at human levels, but doing still some impressive things. We look beyond, for example,
for things like jeopardy, which itself was pretty sophisticated. So there is kind of a master algorithm, at least I have a proposal for one. These deep neural nets, which there’s tremendous excitement about, which is a little bit different
from the model I have, but they have done remarkable things. I mean, they won the Go Championship, and they can recognize
images as I mentioned, better than humans, and can drive cars. And that’s actually pretty simple. You can read about deep neural nets, the algorithm is again,
a repeating structure that’s not that complicated. So the mathematics of thinking, I think is being understood, but I would not claim that
we understand it fully. But we’re getting more and more hints as we learn more and more
about the human brain.

PHILOSOPHY – René Descartes

PHILOSOPHY – René Descartes


René Descartes was a French 17th century philosopher, famous above all for saying ‘I think therefore I am’, but worthy of our attention for many reasons beyond this. What makes him stand out is that he was a fierce rationalist. In an age when many philosophers still backed up their arguments with appeals to God, Descartes trusted in nothing more than the human power of logic. This is how he defiantly kicked off his book ‘Rules for the Direction of the Mind’: ‘I shall bring to light the true riches of our souls, opening up to each of us the means whereby we confined within ourselves, without any help from anyone else, all the knowledge that we may need for the conduct of life.’ Descartes had immense faith in what introspection guided by definition, sound argument, and clarity of thought could achieve. He believed that much of what was wrong with the world was caused by misusing our minds by confusion, bad definition, and unconscious illogicality. His life was an attempt to make our minds better equipped for the task of thinking. To solve key questions, Descartes proposed that one always had to divide large problems into small, understandable sections by way of incisive questions. This is what he called his ‘method of doubts’. We get muddled by certain questions like ‘what’s the meaning of life’, or ‘what is love?’, because we’re not careful enough about how we break these big inquiries down. He described the method of doubts as akin to having a large barrel of apples where good ones are mixed with bad ones. To be a philosopher means a commitment to sorting out the entire barrel to inspecting each apple Individually and throwing away all the bad ones to ensure only those of the best quality are left. Another way to think about Descartes, and this explains why he would among other things, turn out to be such a hero to the leaders of the French revolution, is that he believed in grounding all of our ideas in individual experience and reason, rather than authority and tradition. In his greatest book ‘Discourse on the Method’ published in 1637, he explained how he had come to write it: ‘A long time ago, I entirely abandoned the study of letters resolving to seek no knowledge, other than that which could be found in myself or else in the great book of the world, I spent my youth traveling visiting courts and armies, mixing with people of diverse temperaments and ranks gathering various experiences, testing myself in situations which fortune afforded me, and at all times reflecting personally upon whatever came my way so as to derive some profit from it.’ Descartes spent a large part of his adult life away from his native France in the Dutch Republic, since he held the belief, not entirely unwisely, that the mercantile Dutch would, as a people, be far too concerned with earning money to pester a free-thinking man like himself. However it turned out that the Dutch were a little less materialistic than he’d hoped, and the philosopher ended up moving 24 times to keep ahead of spies and government agents. Descartes’ subjective approach to philosophy reached its climax when he arrived at the famous phrase ‘Cogito ergo sum’ —’I think therefore I am’. The phrase first appeared in French—’Je pense donc je suis’—in the Discourse on the Method before then appearing in Latin in the Principles of Philosophy of 1644. It was intended to be Descartes’ ultimate answer to a question that philosophers sometimes get perhaps unreasonably interested in, namely ‘How can one know that anything including oneself, actually exists rather than being some sort of dream or phantasm?’ On his quest was certainty around this question of whether it might all be a dream Descartes began by observing that our human senses are deeply unreliable. He couldn’t, for example, he said, be trusted to know whether he was actually sitting in a room in his dressing gown next to a fire, or merely dreaming of such a thing. But there was one thing he could know for sure: he could trust that he was actually thinking. His existence could be proved by a neat tautological trick. He could not be thinking and wondering if he existed if he did not exist, therefore his thinking was a very basic proof of his being or to return to the maxim ‘I think therefore I am’. This might not sound like a huge insight, but Descartes used it as an Archimedean point in an epistemologically unsteady world. With this certainty safely banked, Descartes argued that his mind could go to discover other similarly irrefutable truths. Some of the charm of Descartes’ work comes through his entwining of personal details, along with more arid philosophical passages. He tells us, for example, that his revolutionary idea came to him during the winter of 1619, when he’d escaped the fierce cold of the low countries by hopping into a stove and spending the whole day meditating inside. Descartes epitomizes the solitary end of philosophy. One can, in his eyes, solve the most profound problems by searching deep within oneself. Teams of individuals, or ideas passed through the generations as they are in universities are deeply suspect for Descartes. Philosophers don’t need gangs of scientists using expensive equipment, unheard-of terminology and huge datasets. They just need a quiet room and a rational mind. At another point, Descartes recounts that he mocked friends of his who once showed up at his home at 11 in the morning and was surprised to find him still in bed. ‘What are you doing?’ they inquired skeptically. ‘Thinking,’ Descartes replied. The group was stunned, but Descartes criticized them in turn for privileging often nonsensical practical tasks over the beauty of pure quiet reflection in bed. In 1649, Descartes finished another great work: ‘Passions of the Soul’. It was the outcome of six years of correspondence with a royal acquaintance, the Princess Elizabeth of Bohemia, who was a keen amateur philosopher, and a rather emotional and turbulent soul. She had written to Descartes begging him to write about passions in order that she might get to know and control her own more clearly. Descartes obliged. Thinking that the ancient philosophers had done a poor job of analyzing the passions and that ordinary and not-so-ordinary people would benefit immensely from another look at the topic, he therefore opened the Passions of the Soul with a characteristic claim: ‘I shall be obliged to write just as if I were considering a topic that no one had dealt with before me.’ The word provides a beautiful taxonomy of pretty much any passion one might feel, as well as descriptions of their causes, effects, and functions. This is followed by another section called ‘The Discipline of Virtue’, a manual of advice on how we can control our passions and enjoy a virtuous life. Descartes identified six fundamental passions: wonder, love, hatred, desire, joy, and sadness. From these they’re followed in his eyes an unlimited number of specific passions; combinations of the original ones. Descartes didn’t believe in vanquishing passions as the ancient stoic philosophers had proposed, merely in learning how to identify them in oneself and understand their impact on one’s behavior. He would have been very sympathetic to psychotherapy. He believed that a key task of being a philosopher was to help people understand and therefore control their passions; that is, become a little less anxious, status-driven, scared, or inclined to fall head over heels in love with inappropriate people. He was optimistic about how much progress we could make psychologically. Even those who have the weakest souls can acquire absolute mastery over their passions if they work hard enough at training and guiding them. Descartes’ psychological and philosophical work attracted ever more powerful admirers. In 1646, Queen Christina of Sweden got interested in sorting out issues in her mind and began a correspondence with Descartes. She even persuaded the philosopher to move to Sweden to tutor her in passion and philosophy in 1649. However, the early working hour was required. the queen could only make time for lessons at 5:00 a.m., and the harsh cold soon made Descartes ill. He died of pneumonia in 1650 at the age of 53. To remember Descartes by ‘I think therefore I am’ is perhaps not as shallow as one might initially have presumed. The sentence does truly capture something important about him and the task of philosophy in general. It signals a commitment to working through emotional confusion, prejudice, and unhelpful tradition, in order to arrive at an independent rationally founded vision of existence.

Magical Blueprint Courses – Matt Goodwin

Magical Blueprint Courses – Matt Goodwin


Matt Goodwin: If you take nothing else away
from this session, remember these things. So, if you want to take a picture or do something
of that nature, write it down… This is what we were trying to solve when
we built this feature on a blueprint course. Our students, they need a better experience
when they move from course to course. They need more consistency to help them navigate
through the technology, and through your classes. We need easier course creation for our teachers. You know, it’s terrible when you feel like
you’re on your own for everything, and you have to start from scratch every time. Distribution and updates to courses at scale
— this is a hard problem in the educational world, so we’re going to talk about how
we can maybe help solve some of that pain — and assurance that the content and activities
that you plan so hard to cultivate are actually being used inside the classroom. Okay. Let’s tackle the first one: consistent student
experience. I’m going to move off the stage. Sorry if you can’t see me towards the back. Okay. I mentioned that I’m a parent. I’ve got two students. One is in high school; one is in junior high. I actually logged into their classes, and
took the homepage from a handful of their courses, and we’re going to talk about those
real quick. This is where I need your participation. You guys are going to tell me if this is a
good user experience for a student, or if it’s lacking, or maybe some of the things
that we could do to improve upon this. You’ll notice on the left-hand side — I’m
in the teacher view right here, so the students wouldn’t necessarily see all those navigational
items. The ones that are greyed out, they would not
see. I’m going to turn it over to you for a second. Is this a good user experience for a student? Is it bad? What could be improved upon? Hands? Volunteers? [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][02:08] Matt: Okay. The comment there was, she’s linking out
to a Google calendar, instead of the Canvas calendar, so it’s kind of de-centralizing
where students are going. Back here? Hand? [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][02:28] Matt: Okay. The comment here was, if this [phonetic][02:49]
was an online course, and I was a student who had never taken one, it might be kind
of hard for me to get started, and figure out where to go next. Great comment. Let’s go…blue jacket, right here. Woman: [muffled] Okay. She’s having them go to pages, which is
very confusing for students because it’s in alphabetical order, and they really need
to look at the modules, and then they need to go to the modules first. I always hide pages and files, because of
how they’re ordered. It doesn’t make any sense to the students. Matt: Alright. The comment there was — I’ve got my own
spy tech here that I’m going to use. So, she’s using pages in this example, where
pages could be confusing to a student because they’re listed alphabetically, when you
navigate over to the pages. Her suggestion would be to more fully utilize
the modules view, and maybe hide the navigation to the pages, and maybe some of these other
things on the side, like files. That’s all the time we’re going to spend
on this one. We’ve got a couple more to go through. My insights to this are fairly well in-line
with what you guys are saying. I do like the fact that she is grounding the
students — where they can go for critical information throughout the course. There’s the calendar, even though it’s
decentralized. There’s the course outline, there’s textbook,
there’s the calculator they’re going to need to use for this course. Not bad. I wouldn’t say this is stellar, but this
is not horrible. I’ve seen much worse. [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][04:17] Matt: It says “welcome.” Yes. Okay. This is another one. [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][04:22] Matt: Yeah. I don’t know how many comments I’m going
to take on this one. This is what we’re going to talk about. Notice how on the left-hand navigation, right
here, there’s so much stuff that the students can click into. In theory, you know, the recent activity would
start filling up with some of the things that are happening inside the class, but it doesn’t
orient the student to where they go next, when they should go to where, without that
teacher telling them, and retelling them, and retelling them what to do. Then, when they get home, and they’ve forgotten
what the teacher said, they’re screwed. That’s this course. Let’s look at this one. Any quick thoughts here? [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][05:10] Matt: What’s that? [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][05:12] Matt: Use of pictures is good. Back in the back? Hand? [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][05:17] Somebody
learned on Web CT. No comment. Okay. Again, this is not horrible. I’ve seen worse, but the left-hand nav,
again, linking to pages, to the syllabus…I mean, if you’re giving a lot of information
here, do you need all of this, and is this helpful or confusing? Okay. Here we go. Comments about this one? [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][05:46] [chuckling]
Besides the fact that it’s not published. [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][05:55] Course
resources at the top — nothing in it. Okay. Good observation. [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][06:02] Well,
okay. So, quick disclaimer. I copied this course and brought it over to
my instance. I did not publish things, and I actually removed
a few things, because there was a ton here. [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][06:15] Right
here. Comment? Woman 2: The names of the elements [muffled/inaudible][06:20]. Matt: Okay. The naming conventions of the activities don’t
really make a lot of sense. Woman 2: [muffled] It’s not really [muffled/inaudible][06:29]. Matt: Screen reader might not be descriptive
enough, based on the titles here. What about as far as the workflow? Does the student know where to go — where
to start? [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][06:45] What’s
that? [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][06:48] Start
at the top of the modules. Yeah. [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][06:52] Sure. So, maybe in course resources, have some description
information about the course. Those helpful guides. That sort of thing. [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][07:01] Okay. An overview that tells what the section or
module is going to be about. So, maybe instead of starting with chapter
one, lesson one, we start with a welcome page, course information, guides, and that sort
of thing. Great insights, you guys. What about this one? [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][07:25] It’s
a pretty picture. Right. I have nowhere to go. I have no idea where I should be inside the
course, if I’m a student. This is the reality of what our students face
inside of our institutions, whether it’s K-12 or higher ed. I’ve seen it horrible in both places, and
I’ve seen it fantastic in both places. We need to do better for our people. So, let’s move into easier course creation. Teachers, I’m talking to you in this section. Instructional designers, I’m talking to
you. Teachers, who has started their semester like
this, where you get a blank course shell, and you say, “Good luck. High five. Yeah.” Anybody had this experience? Is this where you like to start? Yes? I hear a yes. I hear some no’s. Give me some thoughts. Where would you like to start? Right here. Man: [muffled] If I’ve already made a class
that I liked, then I like to duplicate that and work with the [muffled/inaudible][08:39]. Matt: Okay. He said, “If they’ve already made a class
that I like, I would duplicate that and bring content over, and shift it around.” Who’s “they?” Man: [muffled] If I made a class. Matt: If you. Okay. So, individually, if the teacher has made
a class, they can bring it over. Back here, in the back? Man 2: [muffled/inaudible][08:57] Matt: Okay. The suggestion here is, inside a department,
for example — say, English — it’d be helpful if all of those English teachers had
a common place to start from — all of the tools they were expected to use, all of those
resources. Why does each teacher need to reinvent the
wheel, and bring those into their course, and structure them in meaningful ways? Great observation. Anything else? Okay. Let’s move on. Here we go, guys. What if, in a magical world, as a teacher
and as a student, this was your first day? It’s not groundbreaking stuff here, right? It’s minimized navigation on the left-hand
side. There’s not a lot going on. It’s very simple to orient myself. This isn’t even real text. “Add a short introductory or welcome message
in this spot.” So, this is the template that could be pushed
out to everybody in the science department, to start here. Now, this is just the front page. We’ll dive into maybe the course template,
and what could be included in that corpse template for your courses, but yeah. This is a much better experience, as a student
and as a teacher. Alright. I’m going to go to the podium, because this
is the live demo part. I’ll put away my cool gadget. Laser pointer. The two bullets that we haven’t covered
are “distribution updates” and “assurance of content.” We’ll cover that during the live demo portion. Alright. This elevation is no joke, right? Anyone else, second wind this week? Whew. Okay. Let’s switch over. Alright. Here’s my Canvas account. I’m going to go into my blueprint course. Actually, before I do that…am I even connected
to the Internet? It says I am. I’m distrustful. Let me do this. Okay. Alright. We
got it. Here’s that course that we just talked about. I did include modules, since that screenshot,
since this is a modular-based course. If you look right here, here’s the link
to my “modules” page. Here’s my “about” page as a teacher. Here’s my class overview. These are all pages that have been created
— templatized — for me, and I can just go fill in that information and orient my
students to where we need to go. I’m going to look inside this course. Any course inside of your Canvas account can
be a blueprint course. If an instructional designer creates a new
course, all they need to do is come into settings, and…this Internet is killing me. I don’t know what the deal is. Any tech guys back there want to help me out? [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][12:35] Wait. Should I reset? Reboot? [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][12:41] Alright. You know, I’m going to unplug the hard-wire. That might be messing with it. [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][12:55] Alright. Then do that. Okay. That helped. Thanks. Let’s see what kind of signal strength I’m
getting on my phone. [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][13:22] Alright. I’m going to try tethering through my phone. That might work. Alright. Let’s try this again. [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][13:47] Alright. My phone works. Yay, technology. Okay. Let’s go into settings for this course. Let’s say this is a brand new course that
I’ve created. Ignore the fact that it already is a blueprint
course. We’re going to look at how to set up a course
as a blueprint course. Okay. If I go to “course details,” you’ll
notice I’ve got this check-box right here. It says “blueprint course.” Now, this does need to be enabled. Right now, it’s behind a feature flag, as
you know we do at Instructure. We don’t like to disrupt what you’re doing
today without any notice. We’ve put this behind an account-level feature
flag, where your admins can go turn this on, and make this available to you. Once they do that, you can enable your course
as a blueprint course. We’re going to ignore the things underneath
it for just a minute, and go through the course itself. So, back to my homepage. I am somebody with access to the blueprint
course. Now, this can be — there’s a permission
inside of Canvas at this point, so if you have a role — say, instructional designer
— you can be added to that permission set to say, “You have the ability to modify
blueprint courses.” You can also have access to a blueprint course,
to modify the blueprint course, if you are invited to this course as a teacher. Let’s say, for example, you work within
the English department, and you are the head-honcho teacher at that English department, and you’ve
been authorized to make changes to the curriculum or the course structure, and deploy that out
to all of your peers. You’d be enrolled in this course as a teacher. You could make modifications and distribute
those. You wouldn’t have access, however, to change
which courses are associated to this course. It would be just for this one course that
you’d have blueprint access, whereas with the permission, you can change any of the
blueprint courses within your account structure, if that makes sense. I’m happy to answer your questions as we
go. Okay. I’ve enabled — this is a blueprint course. I go into modules. Let’s take a look at something that’s
different and noticeable right off the bat. Inside the “modules” page, as this loads,
you see there’s an extra icon in that far right-hand side, that indicates that this
is a blueprint item. Now, since I’m in the blueprint course,
all of my items would be blueprint-iconized, but when I get into the classroom-level course,
only things that were pushed down from the blueprint course will have that icon. You’ll notice here that I’m not having
my teachers start from scratch — from nowhere. I’ve got school policies. I’ve got school resources. I’ve got orientation. Maybe this is a requirement that I need all
of my teachers to have inside of their course. So, with blueprint courses, I do have the
capability of making sure some of these objects stay intact, and part of the course. I can lock this into the course. So…[joking] these fast Internets are super
awesome. I’ve locked these resource pieces into the
course. I’m making sure the students have access
to this, regardless of who their teacher is. Question here? [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][17:05] Okay. The question here, which we will get to in
the workflow, but — the question is, “If I’m a teacher, an adjunct teacher, or a
teacher inside of a classroom-level course, and I’ve already made changes to my course,
and all of a sudden a blueprint tries to copy down into my course, is it going to replace
my stuff?” The answer is, it depends. If it’s stuff that you’ve created, absolutely
not. There’s no association there. If it’s stuff that has been left unlocked,
meaning it can be modified by the instructor once it hits the classroom — this is primarily
a templating tool. I don’t anticipate — the majority of the
content in here would be locked as it’s distributed, in most cases. Those are editable. Inside the classroom, you can make an edit,
and if it’s edited on the blueprint side and redistributed, it’s not going to overwrite
what you’ve done inside of your course. We’re assuming you have what you need in
your course to be successful, because you did it. You know your class. We’re not going to replace that. Couple hands back here? [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][18:28] Great
question. Okay. The question was, “How do I, as a teacher,
know that this blueprint course exists, and how do I get access and participate?” Commons was brought up. Let me quickly talk about the difference. They both have their place, and they’re
both extremely useful. Commons is the content-shopping experience. This is where I’m going to cultivate and
curate, and build my course with materials that are meaningful to that class. That’s building a course. This is distributing to all of my teachers
for a starting point. I could be the recipient of a blueprint course
copy, and still need to go out to Commons and pull information down. One is administrative kind of distribution,
making sure that everybody has this same content. The other is, “How do I shop and find content
inside of Commons?” To the second part of that question, how do
you get access? Well, I would submit that most teachers probably
won’t be inside the blueprint course itself. In most cases. There will be definitely some use cases where
that is true, but this is for our instructional designers, our administrative body, to start
putting the building blocks together for that classroom. It may have zero content in it. It may just be the navigational elements along
the left-hand side, and maybe some resource material. That might be it, and that gets distributed
out to the teachers. Questions? Right here, first. [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][20:25] So, if
you’re in the classroom, a recipient of a blueprint course, can you change the navigational
elements on the left-hand side? Yes. This is where you start. Right now, there’s a lot that’s just,
by default, enabled along that left-hand nav. In most cases, it’s probably not needed,
but teachers don’t always go through and curate that list to be the most effective. This is not lockable by the administrative
body, so a teacher in the classroom can change this. Let’s take a quick pause on the questions. Let’s move through a little bit more of
the demo, and we’ll make sure we save enough time for questions at the end, just because
I want to make sure you guys get all the goodness of the features here. You guys liking it so far? Does it seem useful? Okay. [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][21:17]
Yeah. Blueprint courses don’t work without Internet,
just so you know. I’m going to pretend that the rest of this
content is…I’m not going to lock it. I’m going to allow my teachers to go ahead
and modify this as much as they want — you know, like the “About Your Teacher.” Obviously, it’s not going to be the same
teacher in every single classroom. The teacher is going to have to edit that. I’m not going to lock that. I’ve got a good course structure here. What I’m going to do now is, you notice
this cool little slidey-tray on this side? [joking] That’s technical. This is only available in the blueprint course,
once it’s been enabled, and what this does is, it tells me which classroom-level courses
this blueprint is associated to. I have a UI in here, where I can make those
associations. I can also create those associations through
an SIS import, through an additional column that will allow you to input the SIS ID of
the blueprint course, as well as through the API. There’s a lot of ways you can create these
associations, and we’ll get into this association screen in just a second. Sync history — every time I deploy a change
it’s going to keep track, and keep record. Then, un-synced changes — so, changes I’ve
made inside of this blueprint course that I still need to distribute. It’s going to tell me what those are. Then I’ve got a coupled of options here,
where I can include the course settings. It automatically does this the first time
I sync to an empty course shell, or a new association, but after that, it doesn’t. I’m assuming that teachers are going to
mess with the nav a little bit. I don’t want to overwrite that every time,
unless it’s getting out of control, and I need to reel my teachers back in. [joking] I’m sure that never happens. Okay. I also can choose to send notifications. If I’m just making a spelling correction,
I’m not going to send a notification to all of my teachers and freak them out about
some change in the course, but if it’s, “Hey, I changed one of the quizzes in week
2,” you should probably know that, and I can add a tweet-link message that gives a
quick summary of what I’ve changed, so they don’t really need to dig any deeper. This goes to their notification-preference
delivery mechanism, whether it’s through email, text or whatever, and they’ll get
that notification of those changes. I’ve got a few changes that I’m going
to sync out. Well, I’m going to automatically sync those. I’m going to look at my associations for
a second. I currently have one classroom-level course
associated. I’m going to add a couple more here. Okay. I created a couple blank classroom shells
here. If you notice, there’s nothing in them. I’ve got Classroom 1 and Classroom 2. You’ll notice the left-hand nav. The defaults are still intact. I’m magically going to change that first-time
user experience of my teachers and students, through central distribution. This is telling me I’ve got un-synced changes,
and since I’ve already got a course that’s associated, it’s also going to receive those
un-synced changes. I’m cool wth that. I’m going to say “yes.” Now, all of these courses are associated. I exit out of here, and if I go into Classroom
1 — well, let me see. Is it done? I’m on the slowness-of-the-phone Internet,
so I’ve got to wait a second. This is real-time. What this is doing — it’s a little bit
different than course-copy in the past. This is not copying everything, other than
on the initial sync. So, for the course that I’ve already got
associated, it’s just getting those three objects that I’ve updated. It’s not going to replace everything else. It’s pretty smart about checking that, and
replacing what’s necessary. [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][25:14] The question
is, “Can I associate an entire sub-account?” Is that what I’m hearing? So, my liberal arts sub-account — can I
push this to them all at once? Unfortunately not. It’s course by course, so I could take all
of the course shells through my SIS important process and say, “This is your SIS ID for
your blueprint course.” It will automatically create that first sync,
and it copied things over for me. Alright. The sync is done. I’m just going to refresh Classroom 1. [joking] Oh, my gosh. That’s so magical and amazing, right? The images are slow over the phone, but you’ll
notice that my left-hand navigational elements are intact, the way I set them up from the
blueprint course. Question here? [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][26:13] Yeah. The question is, “On the first sync, the
settings come over. If there are changes in the settings area
of the blueprint course after that, in a process of synchronization, are those carried over
into the associated courses?” They’re not by default, but if I make a
change…I’m going to have to make a change real quick. Hold on. I go into this overview, and I go into “edit”,
and I’m going to say…edited. Okay. Save that. Now, I once again have the option to push
out synchronizations. I can include course settings in subsequent
synchronizations. If I do have some changes within the settings
that I need to redistribute, I do have the opportunity to do that. That’s also available through the API, so
if I’ve got some other process, I can tag it through the API to include those settings. [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][27:45] The question
there is, “Can you make it so that settings never get pushed out?” You can, through the API. You can’t through the UI. I suspect that as people are playing with
this and discovering how this is going to impact their institution, they’ll use the
UI for that, but after that, I suspect it’s mostly going to be through SIS and API. You do have that option. One more question over here? [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][28:15] Okay. The question is, “Do the settings come over
just the first time I run any sync on any courses? If I’ve already got courses that are underway,
and I’ve added new associations — say, for the next semester or whatever — are
those settings going to go out to all of those associations, or just the new ones?” It’s just the new associations — the
first time that association is created on that new associated course, is when that’s
going to take place, although I will say that probably, as a best practice, I probably would
use a blueprint course for each section — each semester — and break that up, so I can keep
those courses intact, the way that they were during that session, and then, for the next
semester, those ones have their own blueprint. You don’t have to do it that way. There’s a lot of ways you can play around
with that. Alright. What else should we cover here? Okay. I’ve edited this piece of content. This is the class overview. You remember that it is unlocked. I’m going to go into Classroom 1. I’m going to go into my modules and find
that…what was it, the class overview? I’m going to make a change to this real
quick. This is a classroom-level change of this unlocked
learning object. I have not refreshed this yet. Let me go over to the “learning modules”
page. In Classroom 2, you’ll see that it’s unchanged
here, and unchanged in this class. So, if I go back to my “modules” view,
you’ll notice the title of the classroom changes. I’ve edited this from the blueprint course
site. I’m going to redistribute this, or re-sync
this. I’m not going to include those settings. I’m going to run a sync. Back to the question we got earlier, is this
going to override the changes that I made inside of my classroom-level course? It’s done already. Here we go. I’m going to refresh here, and the one that
I did change — look at that. No change, and here, in the one that I did
not edit…[joking] oh my gosh, I got the edit. That’s so cool. So, mid-stream inside of a course that’s
ongoing, if there’s a change — you know, if we’ve switched curriculum providers,
or maybe publishers and content, and we forgot to switch something out — I can go make
those edits in real-time, and redistribute those without disrupting everybody, and making
them jump through hoops — all my teachers in the classroom. Right here? [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][31:31] Okay. The question is, “The individual objects
inside the modules — there is a blueprint icon. What about the module itself?” Modules are not lockable. They can be managed inside the classroom level. They will operate independently after they’re
pushed over that first time. [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][31:57]. Yeah. Teachers can absolutely add their own content
in here. We don’t have restrictions around that. They would add an object in here. It just simply would not have that blueprint
icon next to it, which indicates to the teachers that, “Hey, this is something I control. It’s something I can edit. I’ve got full permissions over this thing.” Lot of hands here. Right here? [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][32:18] The question
is, “If I’ve got images or documents in the original, are they being copied over,
or just being linked to?” Is that the question? They’re being copied over. This is full copy. This course operates independently. If that association is ever severed, those
icons just disappear, and those objects remain intact. Alright. Here? [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][32:51] Can you
merge two blueprint courses together? Not through the…well…sure. [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][33:17] Yeah. It’s not quite as magical. I mean, you would have to…you can only have
one association at a time, and you can’t waterfall this. I can associate the blueprint to as many courses
as I want at one time, but I can’t have that blueprint course also receiving blueprint
from another blueprint. Does that make sense? It’s not cascading. Technically, we could do that, but that would
be a tremendous nightmare to manage and maintain, both at the institutional level and at Instructure. You’d kill our customer service people with
that one. [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][33:51] Yes. They can unpack that out of a module. Just the object itself is locked. They cannot make edits to that. They cannot delete that, but they can move
it around inside the module structure. They can move it out of the modules altogether,
just like you can today. You can have something published and not in
a module. [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][34:15] We can’t
control all the people problems that go on at the school. Woman 2: [muffled] But they can choose or
delete [muffled/inaudible][34:21]? Matt: No. They cannot [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][34:24]
choose for it to be unpublished. Yeah. Woman 2: [muffled] Okay. It’s just whether or not it’s going to
be [muffled/inaudible][34:27]? Matt: Correct. Back here real quick? Sorry. [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][34:33] Sorry. What was that? [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][34:38] Can it
be done at the instructor level? The instructor can manage multiple sections
of the same course. For example, if they’re running each section
as an individual course, rather than using sections within a course. Absolutely, as long as they’ve got the permission
set to do that. You need to have your admin say, “Hey, we
need the teacher role to include permission for blueprint courses,” or create a unique
role of teachers that have that permission added to that role. Does that make sense? [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][35:11] The question
there is, “There’s a bunch of permissions that we would need to enable for a teacher
that we may not necessarily want them to have, in order to use blueprint.” You can always invite them to their blueprint
course as a teacher. They can do the sync. [muffled/inaudible crosstalk][35:42]
They can’t manage the associations. You’d have to set that up for them, but
they can control the blueprint itself, and distribute as much as they want within that. We are pretty much out of time here. I will hang around the back and answer as
many questions you guys want, for as long as you want. I promise. [applause][36:01] Thanks, you guys.

Putin’s Blueprint for Dictatorship | Putin’s Russia #6

Putin’s Blueprint for Dictatorship | Putin’s Russia #6


After stealing the 2000 Presidential election,
Vladimir Putin’s next move was to create a blueprint for reorganizing the government
into an authoritarian state, with the Kremlin in control of every aspect of Russian public
society. That plan came in the form of a lengthy document
that is now very difficult to find on the Internet, is titled Reform of the Administration
of the President of the Russian Federation. It would be followed exactly. Since comprehending
it is so essential in order to grasp what Russia has turned into under Putin, we are
going to quote its major reforms word-for-word. 1. The formation of a controlled mass public
platform for all politicians and public-political organizations of the Russian Federation, supporting
the President of the R.F. 2. The continuing removal from the Russian
political arena of the State Duma of the R.F. as a “political platform” for the forces
in opposition to the President of the R.F., and affixing with it an exclusively lawmaking
activity. 3. The establishment of an informational-political
barrier between the President of the R.F. and the entire spectrum of oppositional forces
in the Russian Federation. 4. Introducing active agitation and propaganda
throughout the entire territory of the Russian Federation in support of the President of
the R.F. in support of the President of the R.F., the government of the RF, and their
policies. 5. Introducing constant information-analytical
and political work in all means of mass media. 6. Introducing direct political counter-propaganda
aimed at discrediting the opposition to the President, R.F.’s political leaders, and
political public organizations. 7. Holding public gatherings (pickets, rallies,
conferences, marches, and etc.) in support of the President of the R.F.
8. The organization and management of active political activity in all the regions of the
Russian Federation in order to prevent attempts of governors, heads of krais, republics, and
oblasts to conduct any activities aimed at dismembering Russia or weakening the powers
of the center. 9. The creation and maintenance of our own
sources of mass media. After using this blueprint to build the government
he envisioned, Putin was free to use his power to stuff the pockets of his cronies and pursue
his warped vision to make Russia great. Thanks for watching. If you found this video
eye-opening, hit that like button to help others find it. And we’ll go much deeper into Putin’s
presidency in part 7 of this series on Putin’s Russia, which you can watch by clicking the
video in the upper left. The link in the upper right will take you to part one. And if you’re
looking for something a little more positive in tone, on the bottom left you can watch
our video running down the ten countries doing the most good around the world. And on the
bottom right you can check out our rundown of the ten greatest conquerors in human history. And you can download the audiobook our series
on Putin was based on for free by clicking the link in the description to sign up for
a 30 day free trial at audible.com. For the two man team here at TDC, we’ll
talk to you in the next video.