The focus keyphrase in Yoast SEO – Yoast SEO for WordPress training

The focus keyphrase in Yoast SEO – Yoast SEO for WordPress training


In the previous video,
we’ve described what a focus keyphrase is and why it is important to choose the right
focus keyphrase for your posts and pages. Now, we’ll explain
how the Yoast SEO plugin can help you with optimizing your text
for the focus keyphrase you’ve chosen. The Yoast SEO plugin has a specific input
field for your focus keyphrase. When you fill out your focus keyphrase,
the plugin evaluates the page’s content and provides feedback on how to improve
the text for that focus keyphrase. For example, it checks if you use the focus
keyphrase often enough throughout your text, and whether you use it
in enough subheadings. So, the plugin basically shows
to what extent your text is SEO-friendly for that specific focus keyphrase. Search engines are becoming smarter. They increasingly use the context
surrounding terms to build a complete picture
of what that term means. That’s why we help you optimize your text
with synonyms as well – if you have Yoast SEO Premium. Synonyms of a word are words or phrases
that have the same meaning. A synonym for [dog], for example, is
[canine], [hound] or [man’s best friend]. Using synonyms in your copy can help
people understand it better, and it improves the readability of your text. If you repeat the same word
very often in your copy, it looks like you’ve written it
for search engines, not humans. In Yoast SEO Premium you can indicate
which synonyms you have used in addition to your main keyphrase. Then, the plugin will take these synonyms
into account in the keyphrase checks. Search engines also recognize word forms
such as plurals, singulars, comparatives, or past-tense variants of the same words. That’s why we also added this functionality
to the Yoast SEO Premium plugin. The plugin will now recognize all word forms
of your focus keyphrase. Sounds abstract? Let’s go back to the example
of the dog training school we’ve introduced in the previous video. Let’s say one of their focus keyphrases
is [teach dog to sit]. With this new functionality, the plugin
will not only recognize the exact keyphrase but also alternative matches
with different word forms, like [teaching dog to sit]
or [teaching dogs to sit]. In addition, word order doesn’t influence
keyphrase recognition anymore, both for search engines and in Yoast SEO. So, it doesn’t matter if you write
[a trained dog] or [a dog that is trained]. In both sentences,
the Yoast SEO analysis will find the keyphrase
you’re optimizing your post for. This will enable you to write
in a more natural and free way and still get green bullets from Yoast. Finally, search engines
also recognize related terms. This means that in a text
about puppy training, search engines will also recognize words
like [rewards], [commands] or [behavior]. In Yoast SEO Premium, you can also set
related keyphrases for your post or page, apart from your focus keyphrase. Your focus keyphrase
is the most important, of course. That’s why we’re less strict in our analysis
of your related keyphrases. So, in conclusion, you can fill out your focus
keyphrase in the Yoast SEO plugin, and then it evaluates your page’s content and provides feedback on how to improve
the text for that focus keyphrase. If you have Yoast SEO Premium,
the plugin will also check for synonyms, related keyphrases,
and different word forms.

What is a focus keyphrase? – Yoast SEO for WordPress training

What is a focus keyphrase? – Yoast SEO for WordPress training


This video is all about the focus keyphrase. I’ll explain what it is
and why it’s important. In addition, I will tell you more about the factors you should take into
account when choosing a focus keyphrase. And finally I’ll explain the difference between
head keyphrases and long tail keyphrases. So, what is a focus keyphrase? The focus keyphrase is the phrase
you’d like your post to rank for. If people search for this phrase in Google,
you want your post or page to pop up. In the past, we used to call this the focus
keyword. But, since the internet grew bigger,
and more and more content is out there, it’s getting harder to rank on just one word. This doesn’t mean a focus keyphrase
can’t consist of just one word, it means it usually consists
of multiple words. Let’s consider an example. Imagine you have a dog training school
in Bakersfield, California. You might think: I’d like to rank
for the focus keyword [dogs]. But ranking for this focus keyword
will be very hard, or even impossible, as it’s a highly competitive term. Lots of websites will be trying
to rank for this term. In this case, it’s more realistic to try to rank for, for instance,
[dog-friendly puppy training in Bakersfield]. As you can see, this is a focus keyphrase,
consisting of multiple words. It will give you
a much higher chance of ranking, because there will be fewer websites
trying to rank for this phrase. Also, people searching for this phrase, are more likely to be searching
for the service you offer. So, why is the focus keyphrase important? When you’re optimizing for a specific term, you want people to actually search
for that keyphrase. Choosing the right focus keyphrase
is important because otherwise,
you will do all that hard work for nothing. However, it can be really hard
to choose the right focus keyphrase. While choosing a focus keyphrase,
you should consider two things: your audience and your competition. So, first of all,
you should consider your audience: what are they looking for,
what are they searching for? Which words are they using? You should get inside the heads
of your audience and try to figure this out. You can use tools like Google Trends
to analyze which words people are using. With Google Trends,
you can compare keyphrases to see which one people search
for most often. For example, if we compare
[puppy training] with [dog training], it’s clear that people search
for [dog training] more often. So, for the dog training school
in Bakersfield, it could be a good idea to optimize
for [dog training] instead of [puppy training]. But you should also consider
the competition. If you’re focusing on keyphrases
that are rather competitive, then you will have a hard time ranking. You can imagine that it could be difficult
to rank for a keyphrase like [dog] or even [dog training] because you are definitely not
the only one trying to rank for that term. If you want to analyze your competition, the best thing you can do
is google your keyphrase. Check the first two pages
of the search results and see whether the post you want to write
would stand out between those results. How big are the companies
that show up here? Does your site have enough authority
to stand out between them? Is your post able to rank
between those search results? Finally, it’s very important
to use a focus keyphrase only once. If you have optimized a post
for a specific focus keyphrase, you want that post to be found
when people are searching for that phrase. If you have optimized two posts
for the exact same focus keyphrase, Google won’t know which one to show
in the search results, and they will both rank lower. If you optimize two posts
for the same keyphrase, you’re basically competing with yourself –
rather than other websites. That’s why you should use
a focus keyphrase only once. Of course, you can have multiple articles
about similar topics, but try to optimize them
for different aspects of one term. So, if you’re writing about puppy training, you can have one article optimized
for [the benefits of puppy training], one for [what to expect
from a puppy training class], and another one for [when do you take
your puppy to training classes]. Now, let’s go
into the different kinds of keyphrases. Some keyphrases are rather generic,
others are more specific. We distinguish three kinds of keyphrases: head keyphrases, mid tail keyphrases,
and long tail keyphrases. Head keyphrases are
the most competitive keyphrases. They are very generic,
and a lot of people search for them. They’re also the hardest to rank for. A head keyphrase could be
[puppy training]. Mid tail keyphrases are more specific, derived from the head keyphrase
they tie into. For this particular head keyphrase, mid tail keyphrases could be something
like [dog-friendly puppy training] or [the benefits of puppy training]. Long tail keyphrases are very specific
and they have very little search traffic. An example of a long tail keyphrase could be [what to expect from a dog-friendly
puppy training in Bakersfield]. But although long tail keyphrases
get less search traffic, they usually have a higher
conversion value, as they focus more
on a specific product or topic. Whether you should go
after long tail keyphrases or after head terms largely depends
on your competition. If the competition in your niche is high, you’ll have a hard time
ranking on competitive head terms and you should probably focus
on longer tail keyphrases. If you have little competition,
you might be able to rank for head terms. So, what are the key takeaways
for this lesson? We’ve seen that the focus keyphrase is
the word that you are optimizing your text for. Choosing your focus keyphrase
depends on the search volume, the words your audience is using,
and your competition. It’s also important to think about
whether you want to focus on head, mid tail or long tail keyphrases. In the next video, we’ll explain
how the Yoast SEO plugin can help you with optimizing your text
for the focus keyphrase you’ve chosen.

WordPress SEO Tutorial for Beginners (Search Engine Optimization Basics)

WordPress SEO Tutorial for Beginners (Search Engine Optimization Basics)


So you’re new to WordPress and you want to
get more search traffic through SEO. Well, I’ve got some good news and some bad
news for you. The bad news is that WordPress alone isn’t
going to help you rank in Google. It’s just a tool. But the good news is that WordPress makes
it dead simple to implement search engine optimization best practices. So even if you’re a complete beginner, you
can optimize your website for higher Google rankings easily. And you’re about to find out how to do it
in this WordPress SEO tutorial. Stay tuned. [music] What’s up, guys? Sam Oh here with Ahrefs, the SEO tool that
helps you grow your search traffic, research your competitors and dominate your niche. Now first, I want to clear up any confusion. WordPress is a Content Management System that’s
basically the industry standard for bloggers. But it’s developed quite a bit over time where
you can now create all sorts of websites from e-commerce to forums to essentially whatever
you want. Now, WordPress SEO is no different than just
regular search engine optimization. So what I’m referring to is using WordPress
as a tool to make traditional SEO techniques and strategies easier to implement and technically
sound. So for the most part, we’ll be covering the
on-page optimization best practices while other off-page strategies like link building
will all be the same whether you use WordPress or anything else. So let’s get to it. Before we get into the WordPress interface,
I just want to make a quick note on theme selection. Now there are a ton of free and premium templates
you can get, so here are two things that you should look for. First, the theme should be mobile responsive. And this is important because as Google said,
mobile-friendly content may perform better for those who are searching on mobile. And second, you should avoid themes that are
bloated with plugins or third-party scripts that you really don’t need. So read through the theme descriptions to
see what’s included and you could also run the theme demo URL through page speed tools
like Google’s PageSpeed insights, Pingdom or GTmetrix. Alright, let’s move on to some important WordPress
settings. First, we need to decide whether we want to
use just domain.com or www.domain.com. And the reason for this is because Google
will look at these two pages separately. Now the good thing about WordPress is that
it’ll automatically redirect the other version to the one that you choose. So, if you have a new website, then it doesn’t
really matter which one you select. But if you’ve ever used both protocols, or
you have an issue like this website, where you can access the same page from different
URLs then you’ll want to see which version has more backlinks pointing at it. You can check this by using Ahrefs’ Site Explorer
tool. Just enter your domain, then you’ll want to
take note of the number of referring domains pointing at your website. Then take the other version of the URL and
do the same thing. And in this case, there’s a clear winner,
but for other sites, where it’s not so obvious, you would want to manually do a full backlink
analysis using the backlinks report. You can change your URL by clicking on settings. And then edit both your WordPress Address
URL and Site Address URL. Now, if you have existing content on your
website and you change your URL, there are issues that can arise so I’d recommend
having access to a developer you can contact if need be. Alright, next we want to make sure our permalinks
are set up optimally. So click on “permalinks” under “settings”
in the sidebar. And you can see from the previews that permalinks
are basically just the URLs for your posts and pages. The one that I prefer using is “post name”
and that’s for two reasons. #1. People can look at your URL and know immediately
what it’s about. So take a look at these links from our blog,
and guess what they’re about. And #2. It keeps the URL short. In our on-page SEO study, we found that short
URLs tend to rank better in Google as you can see from this graph. Now, it’s important to note that if you already
have content using a different permalink structure, then changing it to a different option may
cause broken pages, which is a bad thing, particularly if you have backlinks pointing
at them. But if you want to set up your structure this
way, then you may need to add redirects, which you can do with a plugin like Redirection. The other plugin that I highly recommend installing
is Yoast SEO. Now this plugin is the industry standard and should
work great for you out of the box. If your site is new, then you can hover over
the SEO menu in the sidebar, and go to XML sitemaps. You’ll want to make sure that this checkbox
is checked and that you generate an XML sitemap which you can submit to search engines like
Google and Bing. As a general rule of thumb, you only want
to include pages that you want Google to find on your website here. So I’ve disabled the author sitemap, excluded
media pages, as well as tags and format pages. We’ll touch on some of the other advanced
settings in the second video from a technical SEO standpoint, which you won’t want to miss
out on. Alright on to the meat of the tutorial, and
that’s the on-page optimization tips you should use for every single piece of content you
create. You can create a new piece of content as a
post or a page. And by default, posts are used for your blog. And pages, on the other hand, are more commonly
used for static pages that don’t really change often like your About Us page, Contact page,
or Services pages. So let’s create a post. In terms of SEO, there are 4 main parts here. The title, URL, body of the content, and your
meta tags. And we’ll tackle these in this order. This part here is where you set a title for
your post. In general, the title that you enter here
will act as your H1 tag from an on-page SEO standpoint. Now, the main goal of the title is to entice
visitors to click through to your article, while accurately describing what the content
on the page is about. So you want to create something that’s “click-worthy”
and not “clickbait.” The second basic tip is to include your primary
keyword phrase in your title. For example, if we were writing a post on
the “best nike running shoes,” then our title might be: “17 Best Nike Running Shoes For Optimal Performance
and Comfort (2018 Guide)” By default, WordPress will change your URL
slug to the full name of the post. But we can edit it and change it to our primary
keyword target, where dashes would replace the spaces. So I’ll change it to best-nike-running-shoes
and click ok. Next is the body. Since we’re talking specifically about WordPress
SEO, I want to focus on the editor, rather than on-page ranking factors. And we have a good video on that, so I’ll link
it up in the card and description. Now, your editor will likely look different
from mine, since themes and plugins can add additional features. The first drop-down is very important because
it includes text formatting styles. So you can include H2s, H3s, and other subheadings
into your post with the click of a mouse. So in this case, our H1 is the title that
we already set up here and an H2 would be a sub-heading like Zoom Running Shoes, which
is a brand line. And if we wanted to include specific models
within the Zoom line, then we can create an H3 like Nike Zoom Fly and elaborate on the
model. Using headings helps create a structure, which
can help Google better understand your content, and also improves readability for your users. The other two SEO relevant features are hyperlinks
and images. To create a hyperlink, select the text you
want to create a link from, then click on the link icon, and enter in the URL you want
to link to. The selected text will then act as what we
call anchor text. You can click on the gear icon to get more
options. I highly recommend selecting the “Open link
in a new tab” checkbox, which will do exactly what it says when a visitor clicks the link. This is good for keeping visitors on your
site, while still being able to direct them to helpful resources. And the final feature in here is the “Add Media” button. This is used to insert images into your post. You can just drag and drop your photos in
here, and WordPress will upload it to your server. After it’s done uploading, I highly recommend
filling in the “Alt Text.” And this is good to add for a few reasons. First, it adds more context to the page, telling
Google what the image is about and it may be helpful for ranking your images in Google Images. Second, it’s helpful for people who are using
screen readers, like the visually impaired. And third, if your image breaks, then the
alternative text will show to replace the broken image. Alright, let’s move on to the Yoast SEO settings. Since we installed the plugin, you’ll have
a few fields that you can enter in at the bottom of the post or page. The first part is the title tag. This is the part that would show up in Google’s
search results, as well as in the browser tab. So rather than leaving it as the default,
I recommend pasting your title in here. You’ll notice that
it’s highlighted in red, which tells us that our title tag is too long. This will result in truncation in the Google
search results, which isn’t that appealing, so we can actually alter this without changing
the title of the actual article, or your H1 tag. So, let’s remove the word “optimal,” click
out of the textbox, and it looks like we’re good to go. Now, we’ll want to write a meta description. And this part is meant to support your title
and further entice someone to click through. Generally, I don’t bother with the focus keyword,
as it doesn’t do anything aside from giving you some “SEO scores” from Yoast. So feel free to add it if you’d like, but
know that it doesn’t make a difference for your actual search engine optimization efforts. After you’ve finished your post, you can publish
it and have an “SEO friendly” post done without touching a line of code. Now, creating a page would be the exact same,
but there’s one main feature difference worth noting. Assuming that you have your permalink structure
as the “post name,” both page and post URLs will show up like this. But with pages, you can actually create them
with different levels, using subfolders. So let’s say that you’re a digital marketing
agency using WordPress and you have 5 different services. You do SEO, paid advertising, social media
marketing, public relations, and email marketing. Then what you can do is create a services
landing page, where you would talk about the different services you provide and naturally,
you’d probably add links to your individual services pages. Now rather than having each service page as
domain.com/service-name, you can nest them under the “services” subfolder. So let’s do that right now. You can see that I’m creating a page on SEO
services, so I’ll just click on the parent dropdown and choose the “Services” page. Finally, I’ll save our page as a draft. And now you can see that the URL is accessible
as domain.com/services/seo. WordPress is my favorite CMS to use, simply
because it makes on-page SEO a cinch, but there’s a lot more you can do with it from
a technical SEO standpoint. And that’s what we’re going to be talking
about in the next video. So make sure to like, share, subscribe, and
if you have any questions about using WordPress for SEO, then leave a comment, and I’d be
happy to jump in. So keep grinding away and let’s get to the
second tutorial.

Advanced Step-By-Step SEO Tutorial (2019)

Advanced Step-By-Step SEO Tutorial (2019)


– In this video you’re gonna
learn exactly how to rank your site in Google, step-by-step. Now I should warn you, this
is an advanced SEO tutorial, so if you don’t even
know what SEO stands for, this video is not for you. But if you wanna learn about
advanced SEO strategies that get results, you’re
in the right place. In fact, I’ve used the
techniques from this video to grow my organic traffic in record time. I’m Brian Dean, the founder of BacklinkO, and in this video I’m gonna
show you my step-by-step action plan for higher Google rankings, including lots of real life case studies. Stay tuned. (techno music) We have a lot to cover in this video, so let’s dive right in. I launched my first
website way back in 2008. Needless to say, SEO was
a lot different back then. Back in the day I’d spend
hours looking for a domain name that contained my target keyword. Dogbirthdaycakerecipes.net
is still available. I’m gonna be rich. Today tricking Google with
exact match domains or phony backlinks simply doesn’t work. So what does? The strategies I’m gonna share with you in this SEO tutorial. So without further ado,
let’s get started with step number one. First up, let’s boost
your site’s loading speed. Google has publicly confirmed
that they use your site’s loading speed as a ranking factor. And from my own experiments
I’ve discovered that site speed does impact rankings, but not
in the way you probably think. Most people think that
Google rewards you for having a fast loading website,
but that’s simply not true. My SEO experiments have
revealed that Google doesn’t reward fast loading websites. It penalizes slow loading websites. This makes sense if you think about it. Google’s number one job
is to give their users the best result for a given search. And everyone, and I mean everyone hates slow loading websites. Loading the page. (techno music) Finally it loaded. So if your site loads
slower than molasses, yes, Google is gonna demote you. But once you hit a certain
threshold of speed, you’re on par with most
other pages on the internet. So Google doesn’t see any
reason to rank you higher. Make sense? Good. Now it’s time to actually improve
your site’s loading speed. First head over to Google
PageSpeed Insights. Enter a page from your site here. Now as a pro tip, don’t
automatically put your home page into this field. Instead enter an internal
page from your site that gets a lot of traffic,
like a blog post or article. That way you’ll get info
on a page that lots of your visitors actually see. Next, hit Analyze, and
Google will show you where your page’s code could use a tune up. Now Google’s tool is helpful,
but it has one big problem. It doesn’t measure a site’s
actual loading speed. Seriously. Instead Google PageSpeed
Insights simply analyzes your page’s code. To get a more accurate feel
for how your site loads to real life users,
check out gtmetrix.com. Gtmetrix will show you data
on how your page actually loads to real life users,
which is a much more accurate measurement of how your
site speed stacks up. Next up, it’s time to check
on your technical SEO. Here’s the deal. You can have the best site
with the best content, but if your website has
serious technical SEO issues, you’re not going to rank. Fortunately, identifying and
fixing these sort of issues can be super easy. Here’s how to do it. Your first step is to log
into your Google search console account. Pay special close attention
to the Crawl Errors section. If you see any issues with
DNS, server connectivity or robots.text, that’s
something you’ll wanna fix ASAP. But if they all show a green
check mark, you’ll all set. Next click on the Crawl Errors button. This will take you to
the URL error section of the search console. It’s perfectly okay to have
a few server errors and 404s. But if you see hundreds of errors here, this is something that
you’ll wanna fix ASAP. Moving right along we have
our third step in this SEO tutorial, which is keyword research. Here are three quick
techniques for finding awesome keywords. First up we have Google Suggest. To use it enter a keyword into Google, but don’t press Enter. Google will suggest long tail
keywords that you can target. And when Google actually suggests
a specific keyword to you, you know that it’s a keyword
that lots of people search for. You can also use the very
helpful Übersuggest tool to see hundreds of these
suggest keywords in one place. Now sometimes the best
keyword is a term that you already rank for. What do I mean? I’m talking about finding
untapped keywords in the Google search console. Here’s exactly how it’s done. First, log into your Google
search console account, and click on Search Analytics. Sort the results by position. Then scroll down until you
hit positions 11 through 15. These are keywords that
you’re already ranking for on the second page, and
with some extra on page and off page SEO help you can
get them to the first page pretty darn quickly. I’ll show you exactly how to
do that later in this video. Our last keyword research
technique is to use SEMrush. SEMrush is my favorite
keyword research tool. Here’s why. With most keyword research
tools you pop a keyword into the tool and get
a list of suggestions. But SEMrush is unique. Instead of entering a seed
keyword into the tool, you enter a competitor’s
website, and SEMrush shows you all the keywords that
they already rank for. Next up we have content development. Back in the day Google would
reward sites that published lots of unique quality content. That’s why so many blogs
started pumping out mediocre 400-word blog posts. But the truth is this. The whole publish lots of
unique content approach simply doesn’t work anymore. Today Google’s number one
goal is to show their user the best result for a given keyword, which means they don’t care
how many pieces of content your site puts out, or
how often you publish. For example, my site, backlinko.com
has only 34 total posts, and I rank for super
competitive keywords like keyword research and SEO techniques. So if publishing lots of
unique content doesn’t work, what does? Publishing less often but
making each piece of content that you do publish
absolutely crazy amazing. Here’s how to create
crazy amazing content. First make your content
insanely actionable. A few years ago Dr. Jonah
Berger from the University of Pennsylvania ran a
research study to discover what made online content go viral. So what did he find? Dr. Berger discovered that
highly practical content was 34% more likely to go
viral than content that didn’t contain practical info. For example, my post 21
Actionable SEO Techniques You Can Use Right Now contains
21 practical SEO tips. And this highly practical
post has generated thousands of social shares and
hundreds of backlinks. This page also ranks in
the top three of Google for the keyword SEO techniques. Next you’ll wanna make
sure that your content is at least 1,890 words long. Yes, this might go against
conventional wisdom. After all, you may have
heard that people won’t read anything online that’s
more than 500 words. But I have data to prove
that this simply isn’t true. In fact, last year I
teamed up with a bunch of SEO software companies
to conduct the largest ranking factor study ever. In total we analyzed one
million Google search results, and we discovered that
longer content significantly outperformed short blog posts. In fact, we found that the
average first page result in Google boasted 1,890 words. Do you remember that
SEO techniques post that I mentioned earlier? In addition to being highly practical, the post is also super long. In fact, that post of over 4,000 words. Next you’ll wanna make
infographics part of your content marketing. BuzzSumo did their own study
into what makes content go viral, and they discovered
that infographics get an average of 2.3 times
more shares than other content formats. I found the same thing
from my own experiments. For example, this post
on On-Page SEO contains a big old infographic, and
that’s one of the reasons that this piece of content gets
shared and linked to like crazy. Speaking of on page SEO,
now that you’ve published an awesome piece of long form
content, it’s time to optimize it around your target keyword. Here’s how. First, make sure that you
publish your page on a short URL. Our ranking factor study found
that short URLs tended to outrank long URLs. For example, my target keyword
for this page is SEO tools, so I made my URL simply SEO-Tools. Note that my url also
contains my target keyword. This is also important for on page SEO. Next include your target
keyword once in the first 100 words of your article. Why? Google puts more weight
on keywords that appear at the top of your page. So to help Google understand
what your page is all about, make sure to include your
keyword once in the first 100 words of your page. For example, in my SEO Tools
post you can see that I used my target keyword right off the bat. Our last on page SEO tip
is to add outbound links to your page. Google wants to see that your
content is a comprehensive resource on that topic, and
that’s only possible if you link out to other helpful
pieces of content. In fact, a recent industry
study found that pages that link out consistently outranked
pages that don’t link out to other websites. Okay, so you just published
your in depth keyword optimized piece of content, so
you’re all set, right? Wrong. Publishing now. Time to chill. Oh crap, I forgot about link building. In many ways after you
publish a piece of content, your job has just begun. That’s because it’s time for
the most important part of SEO, content promotion and link building. There are a thousand ways to
build links to your website, so I’m gonna share one
of my absolute favorites with you right now. Broken link building. Here’s the three-step process. Step one, find a page you
wanna get a link from. Step two, find the broken
links on that page. Step three, let the site owner
know about their broken link. Let’s break it down. Your first step is to
find a page that you wanna get a link from. This page should be from a
site in your niche that has quite a few outbound links. To find pages with lots of external links, use search strings like
keyword plus helpful resources, and keyword inurl:links. This will bring up pages
with lots of external links. Next it’s time to find
broken links on that page. You can find links that
aren’t working by installing the free Check My Links
extension for Chrome. Then when you find a page
with lots of external links, run Check My Links. It will reveal all the links on that page that aren’t working. Finally, it’s time to let
the site owner know about their broken link, and offer
your content as a replacement. Here’s the exact script to send. Hi, name. I was looking for some
information on topic today when I came across your list of resources. Great stuff. I couldn’t help but notice that there was a broken link on the page. I just thought you’d like to know. Also, I have recently published
a guide on that topic. It might make a nice
addition to your page. Either way, keep up the
awesome work, and you’re set. Last up I have a bonus tip
for you, which is to optimize your site around user experience signals. In 2015 Google announced
that they now use a machine learning algorithm called RankBrain. Even though Google has been
quiet about the details of exactly what RankBrain
does, Larry Kim from Wordstream has discovered how
RankBrain probably works. According to his data
RankBrain measures how users interact with your site in
Google Search, and ranks you partially based on these
user experience signals. For example, Larry noticed
a clear correlation between organic click through rate and rankings. Specifically he found that
pages with a high CTR tended to outrank pages with a below
average click through rate. In other words RankBrain
probably measure CTR and uses this data as a key ranking factor. Larry also discovered that
pages with a bounce rate below 76% tended to rank best. That’s because RankBrain also
looks at how often people bounce from your site. Obviously, the lower your
bounce rate the better. If you wanna learn how to
improve your click through rate, check out this video. And if you wanna see how
to prevent people from bouncing from your site,
this video is for you. Okay, that’s it for my
advanced SEO tutorial. If you like this video,
make sure to subscribe to my channel right now. Just click on the Subscribe button. Also if you want exclusive
SEO techniques that I only share with subscribers,
head over to backlinko.com and sign up for the newsletter. It’s free. Now it’s time to hear from you. Which of the strategies from this video are you gonna use first? Are you gonna improve your site speed? Or try broken link building? Let me know by leaving a
comment below right now. So, so you know what I’m saying? So bad it’s good, all right. Wundervar. I could forget, it goes like (swooping). Ugh, I’m like eating it. Vacuum time, construction time. That’s ridiculous, again, looks insane.