How Many LSAT Practice Exams Should I Take? | Blueprint LSAT

How Many LSAT Practice Exams Should I Take? | Blueprint LSAT


Here’s a familiar story: you take a practice LSAT and score
about 10 points short of your target. What do you do? You take another exam. Lo and behold your score is… about the same. So you take another one… and another one… … and ANOTHER one. Each time your score is barely moving upward — if at all maybe even downward. You get frustrated, you panic, you reconsider law school and look at brochures for that
clown college as a backup. It all starts piling up — why am I not
improving? What am I doing wrong?! The problem? You’re TESTING yourself
too much and not TRAINING enough. Practice Exams simply measure your performance. What actually leads to score improvement
is training, very different. Many people mistakenly believe that the
best way to improve is to test yourself over and over again, dozens of times But this is analogous to training
for a marathon by… well… just doing a bunch of marathons. You burn out, you hurt yourself, and you typically don’t improve all that much. Marathon training requires something more
and different than just running full length races repeatedly. “Fair enough,” you say, but how can you
train for the LSAT? First you need a coherent system so you can see connections between questions and focus on weaknesses. Have trouble with ‘sufficient’ questions? Don’t just wait for those to show up
on a timed test. Understand the common thread to all the
‘sufficient’ questions you’re missing. Also, review everything you do, no matter what. This is what enables you to spot
patterns in the first place. If you really want to practice timing
strategies, train with single sections By doing single sections, you can review
right after the 35 minutes, learn from your mistakes, fine tune your
approach, and go at it again! We’ve found that with practice exams only 6,
that’s right SIX are really necessary to become
familiar with the test pace and length. Doing much more than that
prevents you from actually training and gives the illusion of preparation. So remember — practice exams
only show you where you are now but training before and in-between
those exams will get you to where you want to be on test day.