Cum sa faci un SITE sau BLOG cu WordPress – tutorial pas cu pas pentru incepatori.

Cum sa faci un SITE sau BLOG cu WordPress – tutorial pas cu pas pentru incepatori.


Hello, In this video tutorial you will learn step by step how to create your very own website, without having advanced technical skills. By the end of this tutorial, you will have developed a fully functional website, with professional design, in a matter of minutes and, most importantly, saving hundreds or even thousands of dollars. This tutorial is well-suited for both personal blogs and online businesses. We will show you how to develop a modern website that is fast-loading and optimized for both mobile phones and tablets. In order for everything to be as efficient as possible, we opted for the freely-available platform WordPress. This solution is also the choice of companies such as CNN, Forbes, Sony or Apple. The tutorial consists in three easy to implement steps: Step 1: Choosing your domain and web hosting service. Step 2: Installing WordPress platform. Step 3: Installing a theme and customizing the content of your website. Each step will be detailed and explained in our tutorial. Let’s begin! First of all, any Internet website must have a domain and hosting. The domain represents your online identity, name and personality, or that of your company. For example, the main domain of Google’s website is: www.google.com The hosting is the web service responsible for hosting your website on the Internet. More precisely, this represents a server permanently connected to the Internet, where all of the files that compose a certain website reside. The hosting and domain are the only expenses you will have for developing your own website, and they are just 7$ per month. You are probably wondering now where can you buy a domain and hosting services? There are a lot of web hosting service providers available on the market. We choose SiteGround because they have one of the fastest web hosting services and are among the very few that offer free support for the WordPress platform, at a very good price. We have been using their services for more than four years and we are extremely satisfied. Now that we have you up to speed with the two specific terms, it’s time to choose the domain and hosting for our website. Go to SiteGround’s website, you will find the link in the Description under Domain and Web Hosting. Any domain consists of two parts: the name you are choosing and the extension. Extensions can be .com .eu .net, or specific to each country. In terms of costs, a domain with the extension .com will cost you around 13 $ per year. SiteGround will offer this type of domain free, if you are using their web hosting services. Here’s yet another reason for which we chose SiteGround’s services. Keep in mind that if you want to register a .ro domain, you will not be able to use SiteGround. Click on the link in the description called “How to Register a .ro Domain” Let’s start with registering your domain. Type in the name you want for your website. We will go with the myproject.com domain. Click on search to verify its availability. It seems that the domain is not available. If the domain you want to register is not available you need to try a different combination of name plus extension. We will verify myamazingproject.com This domain is available. Next you will have to choose a payment plan for your hosting services. For the purpose of this tutorial, we will choose the start up plan, at a price of only 6.95 $ per month. With this plan you will be able to host a single website with up to 10 thousands visitors per month. You don’t have to worry, you can later change the plan according to your needs. Click on “Order Now” Fill in the order form with your personal data. It is important to choose an easy-to-remember password, but still a secure one. Fill in the payment information. Un-check the rest of the boxes, as they are services we will not be needing. The total will be 83.4 $, a small amount if you think of the prices demanded by specialized agencies or programmers. You can also pay the web hosting services for a period longer than one year. We will take a short break in order to fill in the form. Once the form is completed, we move on to the “Submit Order” button. For validation, we click on “Complete Order Now” and get in touch with a SiteGround representative as soon as one is available. All web hosting providers have a verifying procedure in order to create a safer online environment. Now that we have been contacted by SiteGround’s support agent, we will be asked a series of easy questions to validate the account. For the purpose of keeping this video tutorial short, we’ve cut out the waiting periods from the conversation, but you can visualize our discussion. This validation procedure through the service of Live chat is faster and easier, than the methods used by other web hosting providers, which can be quite tedious. Now that the validation is completed, we can activate the domain. Access the e-mail address used and search for an e-mail titled “Verification Required”. Access the verification link in the e-mail and, on the opened webpage, we verify if your data is correct. Press “Verify Info” That’s all for the first step. This is how the domain’s page looks right now. A new functional website will soon sprout in this place. That gets us to step 2. Wasn’t that easy? Let’s begin by installing WordPress. We return to our e-mail address, where we will find an e-mail titled “Order Confirmation” from SiteGround. This is where you will find the username that has been assigned and the authentification link for our new web hosting account. Remember the username, in this case “myamazi5” and click on the login button. Insert the username and password of the web hosting account and click “login”. From the new window, select the first option and click the “Proceed” button. For the question “What type of website do you need” we will check Personal/Blog. You can choose whatever option you like, it will not affect our next steps in any way. The important aspect is that, for the next question, “What software do you want to use?”, to choose the WordPress option and move on. Now we will be setting WordPress access/autentification data. Introduce a valid e-mail address, choose a username that contains a minimum of 8 characters and a password that contains the same, minimum 8 characters, one of which needs to be a number. Click on the “Proceed” button. Congratulations! The WordPress platform is now installed. It is very important to write down or to make sure that you remember the admin data for WordPress, like the url address, username and password. This is how our website looks now that we have installed WordPress. Did you expect it to be this easy and fast? This is why we chose SiteGround, because it makes WordPress installing a lot easier for beginners. Moving on to the last step of this tutorial, installing a theme and customizing the content and layout of the website. Usually, this is the part that takes up most of the time when developing a website and can seem complicated for beginners. The multitude of themes and developing the website from scratch can seem like a tricky operation. Fortunately, here’s where we come in. After analyzing dozens of WordPress themes we chose one with design and functions suitable for any type of website or blog. Aside from the theme, we offer the demo content for free, content that can be downloaded from our website. The demo content represents a base structure containing a layout for main pages, models of secondary pages, blog posts, contact page with map and a lot of other useful resources. We start by logging into the WordPress admin interface, by accessing the previously-saved url address, which is in fact the name of our domain, followed by “/wp-admin”. We enter the WordPress username and password and login. If we want to change the language we’re using in the admin interface of WordPress, we go to the “Settings” option, select “General”, and from the field “Site Language” we choose the desired language. For this tutorial we will choose English. Click “Save Changes”! We are now going to install the theme. Go to “Appearance” and then “Themes”. In short, a theme modifies the design and functionality of a website, without altering WordPress main structure. These are the themes that were preinstalled in the platform. To add a new theme go to “Add New”. There are a lot of themes, both free and premium, from which you can choose in accordance with your preferences. With a little bit of patience and research you can find free themes that are extremely good. If the budget is not an issue, you can find premium themes, which offer extra functionalities and have support and assistance from the developer. The “Themes” category from the description will offer you more information about the existing premium options. For this tutorial, we choose the “Spacious” free theme. According to our tests, this is a complete and versatile theme. It can be used for almost any type of website or blog, it’s responsive, which means that it can easily adapt for mobile devices, and has a modern and easy to personalize design. Click on the “Install” button! Now that the theme is installed it needs to be activated. Let’s see how our website will look once the theme is activated. We access the domains page, hit refresh and we can already see small changes. The significant changes will come after configuring the theme and importing the content. Our next step is to install the plugins we’re going to be needing. Go to menu, option 善lugins”. A plugin is a module that, once installed, will extend or add new functions to the WordPress platform. For example, creating a contact form. For our website, we will install five plugins. Go to “Add New”. The first plugin we’re going to install is “WordPress Importer”. This will help us import the demo content from our website. Click “Install Now” to install the plugin, we activate it by clicking “Activate plugin”. We will do the same for installing our next plugins. The next plugin we are going to install is “Widget Importer & Exporter”. This will help us import the widget demo content from our website. The third plugin is “Contact Form7”. The plugin will allow us to add a contact form. Another plugin we are going to be needing is “WP Google Map Plugin”. Make sure to install the same module I’m installing right now! There are many similar modules. This will help us create a localization map on our contact page. Finally, the last plugin we recommend is “Recent Posts Widget Extended”. This plugin will allow us to personalize the way recent posts are shown. If you’re feeling overwhelned with all this new information, don’t worry. By the end of this tutorial we will clarify all misunderstandings. We’re reached the point in which we are ready to import the demo content we talked about earlier. To do so, go to “Tools”, select the “Import” option and then “WordPress”. Click on the “Choose file” button Select the file we want to import, in this case, “content-demo-data”. We already have the file in our computer, but you will have to download it from our website using the address www.createawebsite.eu/ro/descarca Once downloaded, we select the file, and click “Open”! after that, click “upload file and import”. Select the username, check the “Download and import file attachments” option, and click “Submit”. The demo content also involves importing the widgets. A WordPress widget is a small block of content that fulfills a certain function, and can be inserted in certain areas of the website, such as the sidebars. For example, a widget can help us show a calendar on our website. Let’s import the widgets. Go to “Tools”, “Widget Importer & Exporter”. Select the “widgets-demo-data” file that you already downloaded from our website. Click 選mport Widget”! Now that we’ve imported the demo content and the widgets, let’s take a look at the website. We see the appearance of some articles that we will be editing later, as well as some widgets in the footer and sidebar. From this point on we can begin to personalize the theme and structure of the website. Go to “Appearance”, select “Customize” and reach an editing area that will show us the changes we are going to make in real time. Click on “static front page”, after which choose “static page”. In the “front page” choose the “Home” page. If you want to have your blog as the first page of the website, choose the “Blog” page. From “Post page” we select the page that will contain the latest posts, in our case, the “Blog” page. As you ca see, the structure and content from the main page has changed. We continue our personalization operations with “site title & tagline”. Enter the name of the website, which will appear in the upper left corner, followed by a slogan or tagline that best describes the project in a few words. We can see these changes in real time. From this area we can also change the title color and the color of the background. You can either choose the color by using the color picker, or by inserting the color code. This is where we set up the background color. You can choose whichever color your imagination tells you too. For the purpose of this tutorial, we’re going to choose a neutral background color. From the “Navigation” option, we will set up the menu of our website, the header one as well as the footer one. Select the “Top Menu” menu, which was created when we imported the demo content. You will see the changes to the menu in the upper right. Later we will show you how you can also edit this menu. Click “save and publish”! Back to the main dashboard. If you also want to insert a logo, go to “Appearance”, “Theme Options”, and in the “Header” tab you will find the “Header logo” field. Click on upload. Here we can choose to upload an image from our computer, or select one from the platform’s media library. The recommended size is 100×100 pixels. Click on “Select”! Once you have uploaded the logo, check “show both”, this way, in the header you will see both the logo and the name of the website. Click “Save Options”. With a website refresh you will see that the logo is now present in the upper left hand corner. Back to the main dashboard. In order to create the slider, click “Slider”, check “Check to activate slider”, after which we can configure up to five slides. Click on upload and choose an image with a recommended width of 1400 pixels, to make sure that it will show properly on all devices, regardless of their resolution. Insert the name of the slide, its description, and the name and link for the action button. Repeat these steps for every slide you want inserted and click “Save options”. Again, we can see the changes with a refresh on the website. The slides are now visible and will automatically rotate with a frequency of a few seconds. Going back to the main dashboard we click on the “Design” tab. From here we can change the implicit layout for pages and blog posts, the general color of the theme (light or dark), as well as the setting for the primary color. Now we are going to change the primary color. From the “Primary color option” we choose a color according to our preferences, in our case, blue. With a refresh you can see that the color has now changed to blue. The first page is now complete in terms of structure, with logo, menu, slider, a call to action, an area of featured pages, an area in which we can showcase certain projects/services and the footer of the website that contains various widgets. We also have the blog page, where we can find a few demo articles that are automatically sorted according to publishing date. Each article also has a featured image. On the left side of the page we have a slider with different widgets. If we go to the contact page we see that there already is a map, a form and a widget with contact information, on the right side of the page. Now that the structure of the website is ready, we can move forward with editing the content. You will most certainly be satisfied with our progress, but we still have a few steps to implement until the final form of the website. Before editing the pages, we recommend that you set up the structure for the links. We can do so by going to “Settings”, “Permalink”. Here, instead of the standard numeric version, we will choose “Post name”. This way, the structure of the links will be: the domain of the website followed by “slash” and the name of the post. We chose this version due to the fact that is easier to understand for users and will make your website indexed easier by search engines. Saving changes! Now that we’ve sorted this out, it’s time to edit a page. To do so, go to the “Pages” menu. From the list of available pages, which were created with the import of the demo content, we will edit the page titled “Page 1 Title”. Change the page title from the upper field and insert the url you want to be used for accessing the page in the permalink field. You can modify the content of the page in the main window. As an example, I will add some text. To modify the featured image for this page, go to the column on the right, at “Featured Image”, delete the demo image, and click on “Set Featured Image”. Here we can select an image from the media library or we can upload one from the computer. click on “Set Featured Image”. Once we are done with modifications, we must click on “Update” in order to save. Let’s visit the website and see our recent changes. On the first page, instead of the featured page with the title “Page 1 Title”, you will now have “Our Restaurant” page and the image we’ve selected. We can click on the “Read More” link in order to be directed to the address of this page, where you can visualize all of its content. As you can see, the page has a layout featuring a right sidebar and the featured image does not appear on the page. Let’s insert an image and the content of the page. Going back to the editing window. In the content field, click before the text in the place you want the image to appear and go to “Add media”. Choose the image, select from the right the desired alignment of the image, as well as the desired size, and click on “Insert To Page”. If, for example, we want the page to not have a right sidebar, choose “No Sidebar Full Width” from “Select Layout” and save the changes. Let’s see the changes on the website. Now that the page looks just as we wanted, with an image but no sidebar, let’s see how to create a new page. Go to “Pages” and select “Add New”. Insert the title of the page, we will create an “About us” page. Insert the content we want showcased for the page and, if you want, you can also modify the page url. Select the desired layout, for instance, I will choose for the page to have a left sidebar. Insert an image, like we’ve previously done. We will not set this page as features, so you don’t have to choose a “Featured Image”. Click on 善ublish” in order to publish the new page. The page can now be accessed by using its url. If we go to the “Home” menu, you will see that there is no link to this new page, nor is it one in the featured pages or the upper menu. In order to add a link to the new page, go in the “Appearance”, “Menu” menu, select the page and click on “Add to Menu”. We can change the order of the pages from the menu by using the “drag and drop” function. Let’s save the changes and see them on the website. The “About Us” page will now appear in the header menu. Great! You just learned how to add a page in the menu! What do you see if we also publish a new blog post? Go to the “Posts” menu, you will see a list with existing posts, created with the import of the demo content. We will erase the post that was automatically created by SiteGround when we installed WordPress. Now go to the “Add New” menu. Same as for adding a new page, we will start by choosing a title for our new blog post. Insert the content of the post. If you want to format the content, you can do it easier in the “Visual” editing mode. For instance, we select a text paragraph and, if we want it bold, we simply click on the bold icon. Here we have other editing options similar to the ones we have in Word. Next we’ll choose a layout for the post, for example one with a sidebar on the left of the content, and set up a featured image, just as we did for the pages. Click on “Publish” and go on the blog to see how our new post looks like. Because it’s the most recent, this post will automatically appear above the already existent posts. Click on the post title for viewing its page, where we can also view the entire content of the post. You will notice the text that I used the “bold” function on in the visual editor. Now that we’ve seen what it means to edit a post, let’s focus on editing the content and structure for the first page of the website. Currently, on the home page, under the slider, we have a call to action, three featured pages and an area in which we can showcase our services or portfolio. In the case of our theme, this content appears on the home page through the help of some widgets. If we want to modify the widgets we have to go to the “Appearance” “Customize” menu. Select the “Widgets” option. Now we will have a list with the available widget areas on the left side. Also, on the right side you can see the changes we are making, in real time. For instance, the first area from the list is called “Header slider”, and here we have the search widget. This area is situated in the upper right side, above the menu. We can add a new widget, by clicking on “Add Widget”, a calendar for example. We will not be keeping it, so we select “Delete” in order to erase it. The next widget area from the list is “Business Top sidebar”, the area situated under the slider. Here we have the “Call to action” widget, which calls for action on behalf of the user and that we will be personalizing with whatever message we desire, with a main text, a secondary text, and a button. The next widget added in this area is the “TG: Services” one, which allows us to feature up to six different pages. Now only three pages are selected. I will add a fourth page that will automatically appear under the other three. I will not be keeping it, so I will eliminate it from the featured area. We can change the order of the widgets with the help of “drag and drop”, same as we did for the menu editing. For instance, we can drag the “Call To Action” widget under the featured pages. I will revert back to the initial order. The next area we will be using on this page is the “Business Bottom Sidebar”. Here we will find a widget that allows us to feature other pages, such as products or services from our portfolio. We set “Our Menu” as a title and insert a description. Further down we can select the three pages which featured images we want to be showcased in this area. The website’s footer is divided into four widget areas. In each area, we can add and edit the widget that we want. I will currently leave it as is. We save the changes and go edit the contact page. As I already mentioned, the page is composed of three elements: a map, a form and a widget with contact information. The first step for editing the map is to go to the “WP Google Map” menu. Select “Add location” in order to add our location. Insert a location title and search the address. If we want, we can also set up the exact geographical coordinates of the location. Save location. Now we’re going to create the map. Go to “Create Map”. Insert a name for the map and its height in pixels, select the desired zooming level and the type of the map, then check the location or locations (in case we defined more than one). Plus, we can also select additional information that you want showcased on the map, such as real time traffic. In the end, save all changes. If we visit the contact page now, we see the chosen map, with the traffic information. We will next configure the contact form. Go to the admin interface to “Contact”, “Contact Forms”. Click on “Edit” for the existing form. Here we can add, delete or modify the fields in the form. In order to set an e-mail address where to receive the completed forms, go to the “Mail” tab and insert our e-mail address in the “To” field. In the “Form” field, insert the address from which we want to see the e-mails received via the form. In the “messages” tab you can personalize the messages your users are receiving when using the form. Save changes! Now that we have a functional form, all we need to do for the contact form is to modify the information in the sidebar. To do so, go to “Appearance” and select the “Widgets” option. Here we can visualize/edit all widgets and widget areas of our website, including the ones found on the homepage (which we previously edited from the “Customize” menu). In order to edit the contact information, go to “Contact Page Sidebar”. Here we can edit the title and content of the widget. After we perform the changes we click on “Save”. Now you can see the changes on the contact page. In the admin window of the widgets you will also find the “Right Sidebar” and “Left Sidebar” areas. These areas are showcased on the pages that have a left or right sidebar layout. On the blog, for instance, we have a sidebar in the right side that contains a number of widgets. We will erase some of them, and only keep the “Categories” and “Recent” Posts Extended” widgets. We see that, once erased from the admin interface, the widgets will also disappear from the blog, as well as from the rest of pages that have a “Right Sidebar” layout. We currently have no content for the “Left Sidebar” area, but you can add any widget you want. Now that you’ve learned how to edit the entire content of the website, pages posts and widgets, you can proceed to personalize it as you wish. We will take a break in which we will finish editing the content in order to finalize our restaurant website. In case you were curious, this is how my website looks after I easily finished editing the demo content. I think that the final result looks very well and I hope it will inspire you for your very own project. You can access it yourself at the address www.myamazingproject.com Thank you for following this tutorial until the end, may your new website be as successful as you desire and may you have as many visitors as you want. We await your questions and suggestions in the comments section. Don’t forget to follow the rest of our video tutorials.

Replacing Drum, Charging Roller, Drum Blade, Developer RICOH MP2014 MP2014D MP2014AD Tutorial

Replacing Drum, Charging Roller, Drum Blade, Developer RICOH MP2014 MP2014D MP2014AD Tutorial


I’m going to Ricoh Polska to pick up a new A3 format copier. Ricoh Aficio MP2014 copier. The simplest black and white copier with A3 format. So the copier will disappear from the Ricoh offer for a moment. Only used MP2014 copiers will remain on the market. A series of IM and IMC copiers comes in But Aficio 2014 is very interesting to me because this copier model was very cheap But among the dealers he enjoyed a very bad opinion. I heard dealers ordered several of these devices, then these copiers returned to Ricoh for some reason. I don’t know why, but I suspect that there was a very weak network card the cheapest version of the copier was only with a flap on the glass, the copier didn’t even have optical sensors. So I want to have this device at home, I want to see it. I will take the copier to pieces. I will see how this device is constructed. And should the copier have the wrong opinion it has? Because she looked pretty cool in the catalog. I have this machine ordered, I am just approaching Ricoh Poland. Of course, there was an affair because they don’t sell machines. I have to go to the dealer, blah, blah, blah… Well, but it’s me. Managed to. I pick up the copier and take it to the warehouse, we’ll see what a work of art this is. The cut scenes are, as usual, at the end of the movie. RICOH MP2014 copier replacement of drum, cleaning bar Drum loading roller I clean the loading rollers And a developer My copier is brand new. There is no developer in it yet. In addition, I borrowed a cleaning strip. So I’ll have to reinstall it. Unplug the drum control cable. Open the right cover. Loosen the drum safety screw. Gently slide the drum unit out. And hold him tight, because if you fall it will be bad. This is a Drum Unit we are starting to replace and repair. It’s best to start from the back cover. There are only two screws and a wheel on it. Take the wheel off. It has no security features. Now remove the two screws. Remove the back cover. There were specialists who broke this element, so be careful. Remove one screw at the front and remove the plastic. The Unit is now split. Watch out for one detail. Watch out for the hook. This element holds two units. Remove the two screws And now there is a surprise. There are two more screws. On the other hand The housing cannot be removed yet. Remove the two screws. But this is not the end of the variety Ricoh has prepared. In the center is a catch that you should watch out for. This detail was not in previous models. Don’t pull it because you’ll break it. This is the development team. Add a new developer here. If you’re mentioning a developer, first drop content. Vacuum the interior and pour in a new developer I will not be pouring in the new developer now. Because I do not want to. And secondly, I don’t have a developer on hand. Add a new developer here. After pouring in the developer, we turn the unit. If you want to buy a developer, enter this store. And now I will show you how the OPC drum and the strip are replaced. Pull the cotter pin out. Remember how it was installed. Now remove the drum. Replacing the charge roller. Remove the black PIN. This is the charging roller Below is the cleaning roller. These items should be replaced every 60,000 copies. Now shopping for parts. I recommend only the original. Substitutes are problematic. Replacement of the cleaning strip. I do not have a strip because I needed it. The strip is installed with two screws. The new skirting board is dirty with talcum powder not clean it. We are coming to the end. Install the repaired module to the copier. After replacing the OPC drum, strip and roller you don’t have to do anything. If you mentioned the developer, then do its initialization now. Greetings.

Rendering in WebKit

Rendering in WebKit


>>SEIDEL: So, this talk is a little bit longer.
We’re going to go in to the guts of WebKit. If you guys are sitting with laptops, you
can follow along because we’re going to go through some of sources. I am Eric. I’ve been
here at Google for a couple of years. I work in the San Francisco office which is why many
of you have never seen me before. And I’ve been with WebKit since ’05 and don e lots
of stuff in WebKit. So, WebKit, for those of you who are just Chrome people and don’t
actually know what’s way under the covers; it’s the engine that actually draws the WebPages.
It’s almost 2 million lines of code, most of it is written in C++, it’s used everywhere.
About 10 percent of the total web browser share is covered by WebKit-based browsers
at this point. We have 150 committers, 80 of which are active. That’s actually a number
that’s been growing very quickly in the last couple of years. And 40 of those work here
at Google, 6 of us are reviewers. So, who uses WebKit? This list actually goes on and
on and on, but every browser that’s not Fire Fox, IE, or Opera is a WebKit-based browser,
basically. So, WebKit started back from KDE KHTML who’s forked by Apple in 2001, open
sourced again in ’05, there’s no official releases that come from WebKit itself, but
they do provide nightlies. So, WebKit is somewhat of a confusing term because it refers both
of the project and a library itself called WebKit. That thin library that sits on top
that you actually linked against is what is responsible for interacting with the operating
system. WebCore which is most of what we’re going to be talking about today is where all
the rendering actually happens. And then, there’s a JavaScript library below that which
is normally JavaScriptCore but we use a V8 profile. So, here’s a pictorial representation,
the platform directory which you see there in gray is all the hooks for talking to the
operating system which Darren talked about some in his talk. So, what does a browser
do? A lot of things. This is a few of them. And we’re going to talk about these today,
mostly from a 30 thousand foot perspective but we’ll show enough of the guts that you
can–well, at least, be dangerous. So, the first thing that we’re going to talk about
is loading. This is how we actually get the data into our engine, so we can do stuff with
it. Loading is unfortunately ridiculously complicated. It’s split, part of the responsibility
of webs up at the platform layer and part of the responsibility of webs in WebCore itself.
Most of the code is inside WebCore loader if you’re playing along at home. There are
some that’s in WebCore platform network and then there’s the FrameLoaderClient which is
the primary way in which WebCore talks back to the WebKit layer to actually do the network
request. And then, there are two types of loads inside WebKit. One is for loading an
actual page, a frame, and the other is for loading everything else that the frame depends
on. And these go through completely separate paths inside the WebKit. So, loading a frame;
most of this is in one huge monolithic class called FrameLoader, it touches a bunch of
other pieces but that’s where most it resides. There’s three phases that you care about if
you’re looking at this from a high level. The first of which is the policy stage, this
is where WebCore kicks off initial load. We go into the policy question. We ask the embedder
WebKit, Do you want to even–do you want to allow us to open this window? This is a pop-up,
shall we block it? This is where we as Chromium make a decision. You are navigating to a tab
that is no longer in the same domain. So, you’re in GMail and you click on an apple.com
link. We’re going to fork up a new process during this policy decision stage. The second
stage is the provisional phase and this is where we make a decision as to whether this
is a download, so, we’re just–we’re going to shoot the process that we just created
in the head and we’re going to let the browser hand up the download, or whether we’re going
to commit this load and this is going to replace the current contents. So, you click on the
link and if it’s a committed load, it replaces the contents of the page. And then once you
get committed, that’s what you actually start parsing and this is where the actual data
transfer incremental display, that sort of thing happens.
>>Is creating a new process as part of WebCore or just part of Chromium content?
>>SEIDEL: The creating a new process is all part of Chromium. I was just identifying that
as that’s where we hook in. Loading a Subresource, this is done by interface called DocLoader
and this is where it hits the WebCore in memory cache called cache. DocLoader is a device
that you hand it the URL and it gives you back a CachedResource. And it mans to talk
to loader to do that, you may have to talk to the cache do that, but in the end it gives
you a CachedResource. And the CachedResource is what actually handles all the callbacks
and produces an object in the end that you can deal with like a font or an image. So
that’s a simplified, very simplified view of loading. The next stage that we go through
is Parsing. This is where we make a DOM Tree. So, there’s several parsers inside WebKit,
but the two that you care about are the HTML Parser and the XML Parser. We take the data
stream that comes off of the network and we feed it in to a Tokenizer, either the HTML
Tokenizer of the XML Tokenizer. And then from those, we parse it. The XML Tokenizer is actually
with XML under the covers at least under the most platforms, and so they’ve actually hands
us SAX-style callbacks and we don’t have to have separate parsing logic. At this time
we also do things like handling DNS Prefetch, we do pre-load scanning for starting image
loads and CSS loads before we’ve actually finished parsing the entire page, and this
is when the XSS-Auditor runs. Okay, so, in order to talk any further, we need to talk
about some of the data structures that WebKit actually builds from this data that we just
parsed off the network. The first of which is the DOM Tree in this forest of trees, lots
of trees. The DOM Tree we’ll talk about, we’ll talk about the ones that are use in the rendering
tree which Darren mention to some of his talk and Brent mentioned some of this in his talk
and then Line Layout of the actual lines of the page. So, this is the stages that we go
through, we load, we parse, produce a DOM Tree—we attach that DOM Tree to produce
a render tree, we resolve style on that tree and then we layout the tree and then we paint
and things that Brent covered in his talk. So, the DOM Tree–you’ve seen DOM APIs in
Javascript, document.createelement, that sort of thing—it is a tree of values of the HTML
page–element nodes, attribute nodes, CSS Stylesheets. An example of a DOM Tree, you
can see how the HTML on the left maps to actual WebCore elements on the right. The DOM Tree is one piece, the rendering tree
is what we produce from the DOM Tree. This we hold all the style information, links to
things like plug-ins, shadow nodes for forms—these is what we actually layout results style on
and final tell the paint>>[INDISTINCT]
>>SEIDEL: I’m sorry?>>[INDISTINCT]
>>SEIDEL: When you click on the link, what did you actually click on? When you hover
over a page, where did the hover event go? So, you have to figure out what node that
hits. So, yes. So, within what we refer to as the rendering tree—there are actually
four trees that we care about; RenderObjects, RenderStyle, RenderLayers, and Line Boxes.
The RenderObject Tree is everything we need to paint, it is hung off of the DOM Tree and
it’s only created for rendered content. So, if you say, display none [INDISTINCT]—the
entire rendered tree that might exist underneath that is gone, we never create one for it.
If you display on plug-in, we never bother to load the plug-in because it never gets
a render. This is what a RenderObject class would look like—if you have the source in
front of you, there’s a lot more methods than this but you can see it knows how to layout
itself, it knows how to paint, it can give you the size of the tree underneath it, it
points back to the DOM tree, that’s what the node is, it hangs style off of it and it has
layers that hang off of it. We’ll talk about layers in a minute. Some example RenderObjects,
blocks, inlines, images, text, there’s some base classes for the render tree, one of which
is the BoxModelObject which is basically everything that follows the CSS rules is a BoxModelObject,
everything that follow SVGs rules which are completely separate inherit from the SVG Tree.
Here’s an example of mapping, on the left hand side we see a DOM Tree, on the right
hand side we see the render tree so DivElement maps to a block, the text maps to render text.
So, going back to our set of stages, we’ve now talked about loading, getting the source
text, we’ve created a DOM Tree from it. We’ve created a RenderObject Tree from it. Now,
we are going to talk about resolving style and layout of this tree. So, RenderStyles
are the computed style values. So, when you do Divstyle equals background color red, that
is computed into a color value with an RGB value that’s stored off of this render style,
so it’s ready to paint. There’s a whole phase about resolving style–that would be another,
at least 10 minutes of talk and we are going to skip over that but this is where the style
information is held and we use for layout. Two things are important to point out here
is that RenderObjects can share the same styles for memory efficiency but it means that say,
if you’re hacking in at WebCore, you can’t just grab a style and start modifying it because
somebody else might be using it. Also styles, again for memory efficiency, inherit from
their parent and commonly share data members. So, like when we look at the actual RenderStyle
class, you see down at the bottom the DataRef, inheritedData, you probably don’t have your
own inheritedData object, you point to your parents. So, as you can see here, the render
style class, commonly you instantiate them by inheriting it from a RenderStyle and then
it has a zillion of these access or methods to get the color, to set the color, the original
color, to get the shadow value, to set the shadow value, the original shadow value all
those. Uh-hmm.>>When you say, it’s owned by the render
tree, does that mean you RenderObjects will hold the reference to do RenderStyles and
then apply to the object or something.>>SEIDEL: The Rendering tree will create—I’m
sorry—the rendering tree will create styles and hold pointers to them, yes.
>>Do you RenderObject Tree [INDISTINCT]>>SEIDEL: Technically the method is actually
in the DOM Tree but the styles are held off of the Rendering Tree. Yes.
>>Are the RenderStyleObjects immutable since they’re shared?
>>SEIDEL: The RenderStyleObjects are not immutable but they are shared.
>>So, you have to be careful to do all the changing before you…
>>SEIDEL: You have to clone one if you for some reason are modifying a style outside
the CSS system, normally you would just tell the CSS system, I’m changing this attribute
or whatever and it would take care of making style shared correctly et cetera. But if you
are manually overwriting a style, you need to clone it first.
>>Okay.>>SEIDEL: So, okay. So, we’ve covered all
the way to style resolution, now let’s talk about layout. We’ve covered RenderObjects,
RenderStyles, there’s RenderLayers which is another sparse tree which is connected to
the RenderObject Tree. Layers are for things like transparency, scrolling, the whole clipping,
that sort of thing. And they actually end up as textures on the iPhone, so on the graphic
card and we use a similar API for passing from… Brent talked about passing textures
from the render to the browser that uses CG layer. We use something similar here in WebCore.
Here’s some example HTML, an annotation of where the layers are. So you can see when
we give that span an opacity it gets a layer. And we give the div overflow, it gets another
layer. And we create a tree of these. So more of these–more of these individual elements
have render objects than those that have layers. Another tree that’s used inside the Rendering
Tree is the LineBox Tree. So when we actually lay out the lines of a block, we use a separate
data structure called the LineBox Tree to do that. This is what actually does the text
flow. And again, there’s a–it’s a sparse mapping, you might have–you create a render
text which holds the actual text content, but many lines are going to point back into
that text. So here is an example. We have a Rendering Tree on the left-hand side, and
then for this Rendering Tree we create InlineBoxes in the BoxTree. We get one RootLineBox for
every line and then InlineBoxes with the net line. So every image–it’s laid down in a
line will get its own InLineBox, every tag effectively. So here’s an example of one RenderText being
split into two line boxes because it wraps. One other thing that’s also held in the Rendering
Tree are Shadow Trees. These are DOM Trees which are held off with the Rendering Tree,
which is a little confusing because normally the DOM Tree holds the Rendering Tree, but
here is a Rendering Tree which is holding a DOM Tree. And this exists for things that
are hidden from JavaScript. When you have a form control, those are actually rendered
by the engine, by the WebCore engine, but those are not exposed. Their DOM Trees, at
least, are not exposed to JavaScript, and so there’s a held off the Rendering Tree.
And then we render them using special theme images from the OS like, in this example,
down at the bottom, that button is actually using Mac OS 10s, underlying button drawing
routines, but we’re doing so. We’re making the paint call back from WebCore. Okay, so
that’s… We’ve talked about the data structures that get us to the point where we can actually
do a layout. Now, let’s talk about a layout. And there’s actually a really good example
of what layout looks like, thanks to our friends at Mozilla. This is an example of Gecko laying
out Google.com. You can see those are rects representing the Rendering Tree. And it’s
creating them all and then it’s moving them into place. So reflow is what Gecko calls
it. We call it layout, but they’re very similar. Gecko also has a DOM Tree, they also have
a Rendering Tree. They also have a layer concept. So that’s actually what we’re doing under
the covers. Well, that’s what it looks like to the human eye. So, layout is all done from
this layout method. The first thing we do is we save the old repaint rect, we pull in
any changes from the DOM, we then go and layout our children, and we repaint the difference
using the metrics that our parents had.>>[INDISTINCT]
>>I’m sorry? So, we can ask at the start of our layout method, “What is our current
bounce?” and we shove those off into a rect. And then we go and do the layout, and then
we ask again, “What is our current bounce?” And whatever the difference is, we pass that
to the system and save. Obviously, something changed, so please repaint it. But the general
layout method is agnostic to these. So how you get a layout because a layout is actually
done on demand. It’s not–it’s not done asynchronously in that it’s done on some other thread, but
you don’t generally say, “Oh, layout now.” You say, “I need a layout,” and then by the
time we next paint, paint says, “Oh, make sure you’re layed out before we paint.” So
you mark something as “Needing Layout.” Say, you’re in the DOM Tree and you’re parsing
some new value, you tell the Rendering Tree-you tell your renderer… By the way, you need
to re-layout before you ever paint again. There are a few times that we do immediate
layout that you as a webpage author would notice or someone working on Chrome, the new
tab page or something like that. And that’s when you access properties that require a
layout like an offsetHeight in order to tell you the height of an object, just like that
Gecko example. You have to compute where the heck the object is, and that’s what the layout
does. So, an overview for you–what we covered in our structures and our layout, Parsing
produces the DOM Tree, we build the Rendering Tree from the DOM. The Rendering Tree has
the four parts that we talked about. These are the objects, the layers, the styles, and
the lines. And then we do layout lazily on demand. So, one more time back to our little
diagram, we’ve covered all of these, and we will talk briefly about painting. This was
entirely covered by Brett, so we’re just going to touch on it here. When we paint, we paint
the Rendering Tree, and we actually take the root layer of the Rendering Tree and we tell
it to paint itself, and we tell it to do so 12 times because that’s what CSS 2.1 requires.
There’s a whole bunch of different phases, and painting is actually done incrementally.
I got some strange looks there, people don’t believe me. Well, we actually–we paint first
backgrounds, and then we’ll paint foregrounds, and then we paint underlines, it’s a whole–you
can read the spec. Yeah. So Only Render classes paint, and as Brett talked about, there’s
a GraphicsContext abstraction, that is where we actually handle talking with the OS bits.
And then, RenderTheme exists for every different platforms where it handles things like what
should my form control look like. So that was the rendering tree and the DOM Tree. We’re
going to talk briefly about a couple of other things that WebCore does, one of which is
HTML Editing. If you ever used your iPhone, all of the text entry in there is HTML Editing
inside WebCore, they’re written in mail.app. It’s all, I mean, if you’ve ever written in
g-mail, which you do every day, the rich text editing is all done by WebCore if you’re using
Chrome. So things that fall under the category of Hit Testing, oh, I’m sorry, of editing,
Hit Testing being one. We find out what is actually under the mouse plane. Handling selection,
handling focus, doing execCommands, undo/redo, serialization, copy/paste. Hit Testing works
by we start at the root layer just like painting, and we walk up from the root asking each RenderObject
does this point fall within inside your bounds, and if it does, and it hands us bac itself
or its associated node. There are multiple phases to Hit Testing because you might hit
test backgrounds or you might hit test foregrounds for different purposes like a mouse over,
only cares about backgrounds. But if you are actually clicking on a link, you only want
to actually click the text on the link. You hit test all the time in a web engine. Every
time you move a mouse, you’re Hit Testing at least once. Selection is handled through
a few abstractions. The easiest to think about is just positionForPoint. We, when you click
to figure out where the heck you actually clicked in the text content, we do a Hit Test
to find out what node, and then we find the closest adjacent character break, and that’s
positionForPoint. VisiblePosition is an abstraction that we use to hold a position in the DOM
that represents a position that a user could get to. Not just a range or a node offset
pair, but actually one that a user could click on. And then Selection is one of the 12 paint
phases. EditCommands, this is where we do all the editing logic. We have some examples
at the bottom. We build compoundable command so when you type, say, you type five characters,
you wait a second, you type five more, those all get into one command group, so when you
undo, it undoes the whole slew, depending on your platform. Here’s an example of an
EditCommand. You apply the command, you Unapply, you Reapply, this is for Undo/Redo. But if
you’re implementing a specific command, you would just implement these methods. EditCommands
know what their selection should look like before and after for doing Undo/Redo, and
they also form trees. We let the OS handle Undo/Redo but we actually execute the Undo/Redo
when we’re told to. This is all built Off of EditCommands. One last thing we should
talk about before we get to Q and A is the actual JavaScript DOM Bindings. So when I
originally wrote this talk which was for the Wave team, there’s confusion as to what’s
provided by the JavaScript engine versus what’s provided by WebCore, you as a Chrome engineered
might as well one and the same. DOM Bindings are how we take this DOM Tree that we talked
about an expose it to different languages. Here, the example language is JS, Objective-C,
COM C++. We take IDL files or Web IDL as they are now called, and we generate some code
using a bunch of Perl scripts, we instantiate these objects and we cache them, and WebCore
manages their lifetime by keeping them around until they’re no longer needed. So here’s
an example IDL file. We run a Perl script across this IDL file and generate a bunch
of C++. And that would be for JavaScript or we generate some other C++ that would be COM,
or generate some other C++ that will be for JNI bindings. Objects that are provided by
the JavaScript Engine itself, all the basic permanent types, access of prototype, up to
callee chain, getters and setters, insiders, twoStrings. Things that WebCore provides are
all of these things you actually think of as the DOM. That’s pretty much all of the talk. We can
talk briefly about bugs. You guys should know how to file bugs at this point. Basically,
you file them at bugs.WebKit.org, then we fix them because as–although we have a lot
of commanders here, we do know a lot of people who work a 100% on WebKit, and so a lot of
bug fixing actually happens upstream. Pam covered how to write a test case. Examples
of what a good test case looks like. These are resources for how you find out more about
WebKit. You see what WebKit implements. You can actually look at IDL files at the .in
files. How you contact the WebKit folks including some Google specific resources including the
last one which reaches the Safari team. And that’s it. So questions, comments, concerns?
>>
So two slides back, at the bottom, you mentioned something I’d never heard of before, what’s
an in file?>>SEIDEL: So these are used also in more
Perl Scripts for creating–these are used for creating atomic string caches. Atomic
String is a type of string in WebKit that we only have one of. Atomic String caches
out of attributes and element names. So if you are a webpage implementer, and want to
know what elements WebKit supports, you can look that at .in files. You want to know what
attributes or what properties and elements its supports you can look at .in files.
>>Okay. Thanks. The other question I had is, you said in talking about editing with
Undo/Redo you let the OS handle Undo/Redo. What do you mean by that?
>>SEIDEL: So when don’t handle–we don’t catch the Command Z, and we let the OS level
stack management. We pass to Mac OS10 and say, “we have an undo event that just happened”
added to your undo stack. And it manages to the menus for us et cetera. WebCore itself
doesn’t deal with that. The WebKit Layer takes care of that.
>>Okay, but we are actually the ones that are implementing the commands actions that
happened when you have [INDISTINCT].>>SEIDEL: Correct, those edit commands do
those, I think your mike just died. Any other questions from that torrent of information?
Great.>>So you talked a little bit about that a
bunch of those trees aren’t actually built if, you know, say display equal, or display
is none. What exactly happens, like what’s the process when display becomes, you know,
something else like block. Could you explain how those trees are then built on, you know,
on demand or whatever?>>SEIDEL: Okay. So, if you would change a
property, the DOM Tree has a method called parsed map attribute, just to handle attribute
pursing when you change an attribute. That would learn about the change. It would pass
it off to the style system. The style system would change the display. Notice that, “oh
my God, we need a Renderer now”, it would create a renderer for the DOM object. We resolved
style for it and all of its children. We’d go through the normal process that you would
during pursing when you create that element and you attached it by creating a render for
it.>>Then also, what’s the level of dependency
in terms of the different trees depending on the previous one. Like, do they all have
pointers bidirectionally or how does that work?
>>SEIDEL: The only bidirectional pointers are from the DOM tree to the Render Object
Tree. The Render Object has pointers to the Render Layers which actually do also have
pointers back to the render objects. The render objects have pointers to the render styles,
but the render styles do not have pointers back to the render objects. And the LineBoxes,
the block has a pointer to the RootLineBoxes, the liast of them. And the individual LineBox
do point back to their render objects. So, there are more bidirectionals than I initially
implant.>>You mentioned the issue that at times you
can query for attributes or positions which force a paint operation. Those WebCore have
the concept of a partial paints that it only does a paint or lay out sufficient to answer
the query leaving it midstream or does it require a full layout of the entire display
– sorry if it’s a dumb question.>>There’s an open bag, I can decide it to
you if you want.>>SEIDEL: So, not to confuse paint and layout,
paint is actually very simple we just basically put the rendering tree to the buffer. But
lay out itself is the complicated part and we do not support incomplete layouts. We ensure
that the entire document is laid out before we will answer the question.
>>Yeah, there is support for noting that only part of the tree needs layout, so that
when the paint happens it will only layout that sub tree but it’s somewhat limited and
it doesn’t really apply for queries.>>Yup, but we should fix that.
>>So, just to be clear if I have some really, you know, node really deep in the tree and
I say like dot client web on it, is it going to have to layout the whole page?
>>SEIDEL: As it’s currently implemented?>>Yes.
>>SEIDEL: Okay.>>To the most extreme, we give you the top
element which is just completely obvious from the first 12, yet the entire page down to…
>>SEIDEL: So, when that happens when it’ just the top element that you’re trying to
layout, you may have not even finished loading the entire page and in that case we will do
a layout of the three elements that are on the DOM and it won’t take very long. But if
you’ve loaded the million element page and then you finally ask for some piece and we
haven’t laid out the rest of the page, then yes, it would a while, or longer than if we
need to.>>There’s some objects that manage object
lifecycle, so in some places there is raw pointers passed around and sometimes there’s
this other objects, are there any rules as to when you should use a raw pointer and when
you should use one of these other objects.>>SEIDEL: So, the other objects that are
most common are what’s called Ref pointers and pasref pointers and these are for indicating
that you own the object. Ref pointers are, you exposed when you own the lifecycle so,
I ask some object to get its frame pointer and its saying, “I’m holding on to the frame
for you, I’m just allowing your access to It”. If it is, if it is taking a pasref pointer,
that means that it’s taking ownership. And ref pointers are generally not used in arguments
and returns, ref pointers are used to maintain ownership and take care of the destructor
or letting go of the ref during destructor.>>Thanks.
>>If you want to know anything more about the pasref pointers and ref pointers and all
that stuff in WebKit, if you just Google for pasref pointerm, I think it’s the first results,
it’s a really, really great document on WebKit.org about when do you use different ones and that
kind of stuff and explain the history.>>SEIDEL: Yup.
>>If you have to write WebKit code, you should read that document.
>>Peter says, if you have to write WebKit code, you should definitely read that.
>>SEIDEL: Maybe like three times. Derrin Adler wrote it, as you said you Google pasref
pointer and it will be the first hit. Any other questions? Great. END OF FILE

weForms – The Best Contact Form Plugin for WordPress

weForms – The Best Contact Form Plugin for WordPress


weForms is the next generation contact form plugin for WordPress. with its single page application structure
it’s blazing fast to use and gives amazing user experience. With a single
click, you can create ready to use forms without even changing a single
configuration. The drag-and-drop form builder gives you live preview on what
you are building and it’s very beginner friendly. Build
your own form with 20+ custom field types. Send unlimited email notifications
to various destinations and free integration with slack gives you instant
form submission notification. The premium version connects your form with dozens
of various services. Manage your contact form submissions easily export the forms
as well as the submission entries. WordPress is changing, so are we. Try we
forms today.

Stock Logic Pro X Plugins Vs 3rd Party Plugins (Mixing)

Stock Logic Pro X Plugins Vs 3rd Party Plugins (Mixing)


Oh away from hey what’s going on out
there I’m Sean Divine hope you all are doing well today I have a new
tutorial where we’re going to do a direct comparison of the stock plugins
in Logic Pro X compared to some third-party plugins
some of them fairly expensive plugins but this is a really popular question on
the channel from those of you who are curious you know do I really need
third-party plugins what are the strong points of some of
the stock plugins and Logic Pro X and what are some of the weak points so what
are the first third-party plugins that you should invest in after you’ve gotten
used to the stock plugins but first let’s just take a listen I actually have
set up this verse in sections and the first section is mixed entirely with
stock Logic Pro X plugins and then the second is mixed with third-party plugins
from companies like waves fabfilter I think it’s just those two and then we’ve
got also some third-party reverb I have the seventh heaven from Liquid Sonics
and the echoboy on the delay and then obviously in logic i have corresponding
stock plugins and the settings are very very close I tried to make sure things
like the compression ratios are very very similar across the board in terms
of thresholds ratios all that stuff so let’s go ahead and play it back again
the first section of the verse are stock logic pro plugins the second half are
third-party plugins all right so let’s do it one more time
and I’m gonna solo our vocals here so that you can keep an eye on the analyzer
over here and the frequency you’re gonna see that they’re very very similar but
this will give you just a better idea specifically some differences in the
sound alright so that gives you a
good idea of just the different sounds they’re they’re not that dramatically
different there are some subtleties in the different chains and I want to talk
now about you know each of the individual corresponding plugins that I
use for the stock plugins and then third-party plugins and kind of you know
which ones are a little more the weaker links in terms of the stock plugins so
got a noise gate on both the stock as well as the third-party and a noise gate
you really don’t need a third-party noise gate this noise gate in Logic Pro
X is a wonderful utility plug-in it does exactly what it’s supposed to do
which is just attenuate that noise floor and you don’t need a third party noise
gate in my personal opinion it’s not going to change a whole lot now getting
into our deductive EQ let me pull up the deductive EQ over here on the third
party which is the Pro-Q and then I’m using this stock Logic Pro X channel
EQ now you see I’ve cut them at the same points and to be honest with you for
doing deductive EQ I think the channel EQ and Logic Pro X is perfectly fine you
really get more into the differences of EQ when you start adding so you’re going
to have to bring colors and the curves are really
gonna affect this sound a lot more and we’re gonna get into that in just a
second but as far as just cutting things the logic stock EQ is is wonderful I
don’t have any qualms with it now let’s go on to the compression which is
obviously a very very important part of the vocal or any vocal especially with
your hip-hop vocals so let’s talk about the stock Logic Pro X compressor versus
some of the others like the proceed to the waves r comp some of these those
other popular third-party compressors I will say that in my opinion the stock
Logic Pro X compressor is one of the biggest assets of the stock plugins that
are included in Logic Pro it has a lot of these different flavors up here so
you can select different kinds of compressors just by flicking the switch
and it will maintain your ratio your threshold settings so you can go through
and get some different colors which is really important with compression you
want to experiment with different styles because these are all going to affect
the sound differently but in my experience the the stock compressor in
Logic Pro X is really great this is not what I would upgrade first this is going
to do you just fine for a while while you’re learning how to use compression
and mix and it’s also really handy just with the way that you can use
sidechaining routing within Logic Pro X so now moving on to the additive EQ in
the chain which you’re going to see up here I’m boosting pretty high on the
channel EQ and what I’ve done is I’ve just replicated what I had done on the
SSL and generally with this EQ I just like to kind of boost the the air or the
extreme highs so I have this set at like 14 K and then I’m boosting pretty
heavily so I’ve done really the same kind of thing over here with the channel
EQ and then I’ve just done some of the the roll-off and the filtering once
again just to get rid of even more lows and low mids so this is the first or one
of the first things that if you’re gonna move towards third-party plugins
the the additive EQs are really
important and ones like this the SSL they just have a certain color to them
and they have a certain curve to the frequency boost that just sounds really
musical it fits well in the mix as opposed to the channel EQ it’s not that
it won’t do the job but it’s just a little bit harsher and it’s a bit
tougher to be really precise and make musical types of boosts without having
to get in and be you know extremely surgical with how you’re you know
creating these boosts so just something to be aware of but I would highly
recommend investing in an EQ as one of your first third party plugins once
you get to that point ones like the SSL EQ the the pro-q – for boosting your
frequencies especially high end is going to be really helpful for you and very
musical alright next up we got the de-esser and I’m gonna tell you right
now this is the first plug-in if you’re using Logic Pro X that I would invest in
third-party because the de-esser in Logic Pro X it’s not very user-friendly
you can get a decent kind of tone out of it but it takes a lot of work and as you
heard I personally don’t think that it sounds nearly as smooth and it’s not
doing the the same job as the waves de-esser so you can generally get this
waves deesser for a really affordable price and it’s totally worth it
especially if you’re using these digital maybe a USB mic or you don’t have a
preamp you’re just running through you know a really kind of harsh sort of
signal chain then this de-esser is going to take care of that sibilance that you
really want to tame with your vocals especially in hip-hop so that it’s just
you know that is one of the most annoying things in a vocal is having too
much sibilance so definitely check out third party deessers like that or also the
fabfilter Pro DS is a good one I’m also using this Manny Marroquin Triple D
which again is just great for those of you who are recording with a very
digital kind of clean signal chain this is gonna
warm things up a little bit de-harsh it let’s get to the last thing in our chain
which is just a limiter and all I’m doing with this is just preventing us
from going above zero if you’re using a limiter just in this way on your actual
bus I think the stock limiter does just fine now if we start talking about
master limiters then I think the the Logic Pro X stock plugins are really
limited no pun intended in that way because I believe it is the adaptive
limiter yeah or even the multipressor just the limiter if you’re using this
for mastering it’s just not going to be as transparent as something like ozone
or even the fabfilter Pro L the waves l2 is even going to give you a
cleaner sound so I would recommend one of those before running your mix through
one of those processors in Logic Pro X because it is going to affect your
transients in a not-so-pleasant way so last let’s get to just our send effects
or some of the auxes that I have set up here I’ve got the space designer for the
the reverb in Logic Pro X which honestly it’s a great reverb I really don’t think
that you need to venture too far out from that for a while I do like this 7th
heaven and some of the other third party reverbs the lexicon is a really nice
reverb but again I wouldn’t get ahead of yourself I would start off with the
space designer and even some of the other logic reverb plugins like platinum verb
are you know they’re generally pretty nice tones to them so that’s not really
a troublesome area at least when you’re starting out and then go into our delay
I have the third-party plug-in as echoboy which is a really strong echo
and delay processor processor in my opinion it’s probably the best out there
it’s tough to beat but if you’re just doing like basic you know delay throws
and maybe subtle delays like in the verse like in this one we just have a
16th note delay that’s just giving us a little bit of a stereo effect
so for stuff like that you know again this is going to do you just fine the
tape delay in Logic Pro X let’s just talk about metering really quickly we
you know were able to look at these meters as we were checking out these
verse vocal chains and I have the waves I have some other metering you know I
used the logic excuse me I use the ozone metering sometimes I have one from
plugin alliance called BX meter that I used sometimes and to be honest they all
really tell you the same thing like this one’s measuring RMS right now and peak
this one’s doing peak and RMS and they generally are gonna give you really
close readings to each other this is the same thing peak or rms it’s more about
what you’re kind of used to looking at and what’s going to be the easiest for
you to reference during your mix so if you just glance at one of these you can
really get a quick idea of what is going on so more than anything else in terms
of features they really do the same thing it’s just what is your
personal preference so just keep that in mind but for at least when you’re
starting out again the stock metering and logic is going to be just fine for
you alright y’all so we talked about the stock Logic Pro X plugins specifically
for mixing and compared them with the third-party plug-ins a couple from
waves fabfilter we’ve got some stuff in there from soundtoys some really nice
third-party plugins they’re gonna be more expensive and my advice to you
would be get really comfortable with the stock Logic Pro X plugins and then some
of the first ones that you’re gonna want to check out once you do get comfortable
with those would be a additive EQ something that’s going to give you some
nice clean boosts give you a professional top-end and then I would
look into the de-esser because that again is a gaping hole in some of Logic
Pro X’s plug-in chains and finally you want to invest in a good master limiter
or brick wall limiter so that when you’re doing your mixes and you want to
bring things out at commercial levels and you just want to keep things in
check not peaking on your master bus you’re
going to want something like this it’s not going to drastically affect your transients and it’s going to keep your dynamics in check so definitely
check out something like ozone or even the L2 to the L1 in some cases is OK
from waves as well so a lot of good options out there that are gonna serve
you better than the Logic Pro X master limiters hope the video is helpful for
you if you have any questions about the stock Logic Pro X plugins or third-party
plugins that we compared here feel free to leave a comment below if you learned
anything in the video please like and subscribe and we’ll talk to you soon

Blueprint Quickshot: Adding 3D Widgets | 10 | v4.7 Tutorial Series | Unreal Engine

Blueprint Quickshot: Adding 3D Widgets | 10 | v4.7 Tutorial Series | Unreal Engine


♪♪♪ Wes Bunn: Hello again everyone, and welcome.
In this video, we are going to take a look at how we can expose variables inside of our Blueprints as 3D widgets that we can then use, modify, and manipulate inside of our viewport. Let’s get started. We are using the Blueprint First
Person Template project With Starter Content enabled. Let’s create a brand new Blueprint. In the Modes panel, go to the Basic tab
and drag an Empty Actor into the scene. In the Details panel, click the +Add Component button. Type and select, “Scene Component”. A Scene Component will allow us
to manipulate the Transform. I am going to call this component, “Root”. Click the +Add Component button.
Type and select, “Static Mesh”. That name is fine. In the Details panel under Static Mesh, click the None
drop down, type “cube” and select Shape_Cube. We will use a Shape_Cube
for this particular Blueprint we will create. Let’s create a Blueprint out of Shape_Cube actually. Click the Blueprint/Add Script button. Call this Blueprint the “Cube_Blueprint”.
Click Create Blueprint. Looks good to me. UE4 created a brand new Cube_Blueprint
in the Content Browser and opened a new tab for me. Select the Cube_Blueprint tab. There is our Static Mesh Component inside the Viewport. Go to the Event Graph. I am going to Right-click + drag
these defaults nodes out of the way. The first thing that we are going to do is create a brand new variable. Go to the My Blueprint panel and
click the +Add Variable button. Name this the “Sizer” variable. In the Details panel, click the Variable Type drop down menu and select a Vector. Check the Editable checkbox. Click Compile and go to the level.
If you recall, making a variable publicly editable will allow you to see that variable
and change it inside the Details panel. Which is cool, but there is one neat little trick.
Go back to the Cube_Blueprint, Check the Show 3D Widget checkbox. Click Compile, and go back to the level. Now you can see that we have a 3D representation of this variable inside of our level. How can we use this? You can see if we select it, first of all. [Laughing] If we select Cube_Blueprint, we can now move
it around in relation to our Blueprint’s location. It is able to move independently of our Blueprint. So how can we actually use this?
Let’s go ahead and find out. Go to the Cube_Blueprint again,
and go to the Construction Script. Hold Ctrl + drag Sizer into the graph. Drag off Sizer, type and select “Break Vector”. We are going to break this vector
into X, Y, and Z coordinates. We know that the size of our Cube is 100 units. Drag off Z, type and select, “Float / Float”. Set B of the Divide node to 100. Next, hold Ctrl + drag StaticMesh into the graph. Drag off Static Mesh, type and
select, “Set Relative Scale 3D”. Connect the Construction Script
to Set Relative Scale 3D. Drag off New Scale, type and select, “Make Vector”. Make Vector is going to give us X, Y, and Z.
Keep X and Y set to 1. Plug in Division node output to the Z because
we want to scale our box up and down. Click Compile and Save. You can see the
Construction Script has been fired because we compiled. Go back to the level and look
at our little cube. It is flattened out. But, there is our Sizer there. Let’s move it back. Actually,
moving it back is not going to matter because we didn’t adjust the X and Y.
[Laughing] Now we can move our cube and resize it
in the viewport because we adjusted the Z. How can we use this to our advantage? If we wanted to create some kind of
procedural content like a fence for example, we could have a fence spawn at each of the locations
of our 3D widgets to procedurally create a fence. Or, there are several other things you could do.
You can kind of experiment to see what works best for you. But, that is how you expose variables and
expose the 3D widget inside Blueprints. I hope you all enjoyed this video.
We will see you next time. ♪♪♪

Blueprint Multiplayer: Host Menu Design | 06 | v4.11 Tutorial Series | Unreal Engine

Blueprint Multiplayer: Host Menu Design | 06 | v4.11 Tutorial Series | Unreal Engine


♪♪♪ Wes Bunn: All right everyone, we are back. In the previous video, we were working on our Main Menu. We have our front end up and running. Actually, I don’t like playing in Selected Viewport. Open a New Editor Window. We have our Main Menu up here. We can highlight things. We can’t actually do anything just yet except quit. Up next we are going to start working on the Host Menu. This is what happens after the player selects Host Game from the Main Menu. Go to Content“. Select the Text for Decrease Players and type “

What Is Jetpack For WordPress? And What Can It Do?

What Is Jetpack For WordPress? And What Can It Do?


Hi! This is Topher with WinningWP. In
this video we’re going to take a look at the questions “What is Jetpack for
WordPress and What Can It Do?” Before we get started on those questions though
I’d like to look at one more. Who makes it? Jetpack is a product of a company called Automattic and Automattic is the largest
WordPress based company in the world. They make many many things, they employ
hundreds of people, and it’s a very large business. Because of that you can expect
quality and long-term availability. They put a great deal of resources into
Jetpack they’re not going to let it die and they’re not going to let bugs and
poor quality code work their way in. So the fact that Jetpack has made my
Automattic is a pretty big deal; it lends a lot of credibility to it. Now let’s
move on to our question of What Is Jetpack For? Jetpack was built to
leverage the power of the servers at WordPress.com. Leveraging the power of
the servers at WordPress.com reduces strain on your server and can save you
time and money. So let’s look at the last question. This is the home page for
Jetpack and it talks at the top right about security essentials but it does
many many more things. It deals with traffic and SEO tools, security and
backup services, it helps you make elegant, fast, and rich content, and it’s
always there for you. It works behind the scenes to prevent malicious attacks on
your site and to ditch spam. Let me show you the backend of WordPress with
Jetpack installed. This is the Jetpack dashboard and I have enabled some stats
so you can see here my blog stats. It tells me all-time views and all-time
comments. It tells me that Jetpack has blocked over 320,000 attacks on my site.
It’s also blocked nearly 28,000 spam comments. That’s really
dramatic and saves me an enormous amount of time. If we click here in the settings
you can see there’s a whole section of tools for helping you with writing. It
has a spelling, style, and grammar checker built in. Here’s a tool to help speed up
images and photos. I don’t know if you realize this but when you upload an
image to WordPress, WordPress actually makes multiple copies of it in different
sizes so that you can use them in different sizes. With Jetpack it uploads
the image to the WordPress servers and it’s processed there. Additionally it can
even serve it from there like a CDN or Content Delivery Network. That makes the
whole process feel much much faster and again make your site actually run much
faster. There are some great tools for sharing. You can add sharing buttons, like
buttons, and you can even have it automatically share your posts to social
networks. If you wish you can use Jetpack’s Discussion and Comments tool
and it replaces the one built into WordPress. There are a lot of reasons to
do this namely it helps filter spam even better and it keeps your comments off
your site so that if something happens to your site you don’t lose your
comments. You can also set it up so that people can subscribe to your blog so
that when you do a post they get notified via email. Here’s the site stats
section we looked at earlier. If you use the pay version of Jetpack, you can
optionally put ads on your site and then make money from those ads. There’s a
great related posts tool and again with the paid version there’s some great SEO
tools and Google Analytics tools. The paid version has backups and security
scanning built in but the free version has spam filtering built in as well as
brute force attack protection. And if you wish you can activate 2-step
authentication which can greatly enhance the security of your site. I haven’t even
gone over all the tools in Jetpack and you can already see that there’s a
number of things here lots and lots of different tools. Jetpack can process
store and serve media like images and video. It can filter spam. It can
integrate your site with stats and other SEO tools and it can work as a security
firewall as well as many many more things. Jetpack is an extremely diverse
tool and probably no-one is going to use every tool. But most people are going to
use many of the tools because Jetpack covers so many areas. If you haven’t
tried it yet I strongly recommend you give it a shot.
if you’d like to learn more about WordPress check out WinningWP.com

20 Best WordPress Blog Themes [2018]

20 Best WordPress Blog Themes [2018]


In this video, we’ll showcase the 20 best
WordPress blog themes for 2017 & 2018. We’ve reviewed 100’s, if not 1,000s of
WordPress themes, taking into account speed, design, ease of use, mobile responsiveness
and functionality to bring you the very best WordPress blog themes. Here’s a quick look at a few that made the
cut. We’ll walk you through the aspects where
the theme scored well, and let you know the areas you should be mindful of. To make life easier, we’ve created a blog
post that you can follow along with on the OHKLYN blog, at ohklyn 0-h-k-l-y-n.com/blog
(we’ll add a direct link to the article in the description below). There is also a link to our ‘How to Set
Up a WordPress Blog’ video for step by step instructions on how to set up your blog with
one of the top featured themes. As well as a link to discount hosting and
a free domain with our affiliate partner bluehost. If you want to learn more about how we analyze
themes, you can check out our article or video on ‘How to choose a wordpress theme’. All the links to the themes covered in this
video will be in the description box below, and on the OHKLYN blog post for your reference. So, without further ado, let’s take a look
at the best WordPress blog themes for 2017 & 2018. In the top spot, we have Olsen by CSSIgniter. We liked this theme so much we created a whole
tutorial dedicated to getting you up and running with it. If you want to follow along check out our
‘How to Set Up a WordPress Blog’ video which is linked in the description below and
can be found on the OHKLYN blog Cssigniter have some amazing themes, and Olsen
is no exception. This theme will work really well for a fashion,
beauty or lifestyle blog, but could also be used in a number of other scenarios. The main page has a ton of different widgets,
layouts, and navigation options to really customize the look of your blog. This theme has a real elegance to it, and
manages to include a huge amount of content, information, and features, without feeling
cluttered. Overall we scored this theme a 9 out of 10. Despite having a slightly slower page load
speed compared to some of the other themes on this list, Olsen excels in terms of design,
ease of use, mobile responsiveness and functionality. From a design perspective, the visuals are
stunning. The contrast between black, white and full-color
images create a very interesting and pleasant viewing experience. A gold hover state adds a dash of sophistication,
with the default typefaces complementing each other very nicely. A classy serif for the main headings and sans-serif
for the main text, navigation, buttons and other bits of information works really well
together – The padding, whitespace and lines that are used, also allows more breathing
room for content. E-commerce is fully integrated into the Olsen
theme through WooCommerce, and includes a “Grouped Products” feature that is simple,
yet effective. All the functionality you would expect in
a premium theme is included in the Olsen theme, as well as some special features such as “lookbooks”,
which allow you to show off collections, perfect for the fashion, beauty or lifestyle blogger. In addition to that, there is also the ability
to feature products within posts, and easily and stylishly include links to affiliate partners
or sponsored placements. Olsen translates almost perfectly to mobile,
including the shop functionality, making this a very well rounded theme and a perfect candidate
for your next blog theme. In second place, we have ‘The Voux’ Although it may not be for everyone or certain
types of blogs, The Voux is an elegant, beautifully crafted and functional WordPress blog theme
that we have fallen in love with. It has numerous layouts for you to choose
from, allowing your creativity and design style to really shine through. If you run a food, lifestyle or fashion blog,
The Voux may be the perfect fit. Expect elegant visuals and animations. We scored ‘The Voux’ a 9 out of 10 overall,
and it pretty much killed it in all categories, scoring an 8 out of 10 for speed and ease
of use. A 9 out of 10 for Design and functionality. And a perfect 10 for mobile responsiveness,
as it is one of the few themes where the mobile experience is even better than the desktop. Although a page load speed score of 8 out
of 10 may not seem like an overly impressive score, in this case, it is! That’s because this site isn’t one of
the leanest on this list. It has a lot of features and uses a lot of
media, and still manages to score a perfect “A” in regards to browser caching, minimizing
redirects and request size, as well as avoiding bad requests. This proves that the developers put a lot
of work into rounding off the edges. The Voux has a pretty standard navigation
menu. However, it expands in a functional and easy
to use mega menu. It loses some points because of the confusing
use of infinite scrolling in article pages and despite being an image-reliant blog, has
no zoom options. That being said, we had to dig deep to find
anything wrong with this design. Sharp colors are used beautifully on top of
images to create some interesting contrasts. The typography is elegant and also utilizes
bright colors to highlight quotes and keep your eyes engaged. To enhance the elegance, images softly fade
when you hover over them and most menus also have soothing animations. The Voux provides built-in e-commerce functionality
leveraging WooCommerce. The simple shopping experience should allow
you to sell any kind of product. For all the bloggers out there, it’s good
to know that social media is integrated into every single detail of this theme. Every page and every piece of content can
be shared, liked or pinned. Rounding out the top three, is ‘The blogger’ Aptly named, TheBlogger is a good all-rounder. It performs well above average in most departments
and overall scored an 8 out of 10. The minimalist look and feel of this theme
might make you think it is lightweight, but it has one of the biggest feature ranges and
customization options in this list. This theme is towards the bottom of the list
in terms of of speed, however, just like Olsen, this theme makes up for its low score in this
area with its tasteful design and array of features. The developers should put more work into browser
caching where it scored dismally low compared to the straight A’s it got in other departments. Despite all its features, TheBlogger still
has a very simple and easy-to-use design. It features a standard mega menu that allows
for easy navigation between sections. The shopping section is really well done with
a simple number box to increase quantity and a nice tab design to switch between product
information. The image sliders functionality is also easy-to-use
which is great for bloggers! We’re a fan of simplicity in design, and
TheBlogger nailed this! The design overwhelmingly makes use of black
artifacts on a white backdrop – Images in turn have white typography or shapes on them. This gives the design plenty of breathing
space. The theme also makes good use of some parallax
in its images. This theme completely changes its appearance
for mobile. You’d almost not recognize it if you didn’t
know it was the same theme. Our only concern is the very shallow navigation
that can make you scratch your head a bit on how to get to a certain page. The developers pride themselves on giving
their clients a huge amount of customization options and include one of the biggest pre-set
layout ranges you will see in this list. There are also a bunch of custom widgets supporting
different social media platforms like Instagram and Facebook. All images also have lightbox support, so
you can zoom in till your heart’s content. The next WordPress theme is Foodica We scored this theme an 8 out of 10 overall,
with it’s design, ease of use, and mobile responsiveness really standing out. Foodica just missed out on our top 3, but
could easily make it in any other list. If the name hasn’t given it away, this blog
theme is all about food! It has great article templates for recipes
and ingredient lists. The design is also clean and elegant, with
good use of white space and modern, readable fonts. It is easily one of the most attractive themes
in this list. All the color layout options play well into
the food topic, and features simply and easy to use navigation. eCommerce enabled with extensive widgets and
features, Foodica is ‘the theme’ to use if you’re running or starting a food blog. The next WordPress theme is Writing, which
earned an 8 out of 10. This theme is a picture of simplicity. Interestingly, this blog theme seems to be
geared towards artisans. With it’s minimal and clean design encouraging
readers to indulge in the content, this theme is ideal for sharing your handiwork, creativity,
or prose with the world. What lets this theme down slightly is it’s
slower page load speed, and it’s limited features. Although, just like Foodica, it uses white
space and standard navigation really well to provide an easy-to-use experience. This theme is a shining example of minimalism. The next WordPress theme is Paperbag Scoring an overall 8 out of 10, this theme
has somewhat of a hipster vibe. This theme comes from the same creators as
Olsen and shares most of its merits. It shares the same features, navigation and
is all round very similar. Unfortunately, this includes having a slower
page load speed, compared to some of its peers. Olsen has the upper hand when it comes to
design, however, large readable fonts, and a wide range of layouts are a huge plus. This theme has a lot of the features you would
want in a blog theme including a number of custom widgets, easy social media and newsletter
integration and a clean and minimal design. Unlike the Olsen theme, Paperbag doesn’t
include eCommerce integration. So if that’s important to you, go with Olsen
instead. The next WordPress theme is The Chatter We gave this theme an overall rating of 8
out of 10. The Chatter is a good looking blog theme. Every font, color, and graphical element feels
suave and sophisticated. It’s also intuitive and very easy to use,
and includes some unique blog features. This is a well balanced theme and runs off
The Core, Themefuse’s theme infrastructure that allows for easy customization, and advanced
features. When you purchase this theme you get access
to a number of other layouts and designs as part of their core offering. The mobile experience is also fantastic in
that it’s not just a resized version, but they solve some smaller display problems in
unique ways, with great navigation. The next WordPress theme is Supergrid
Boasting an overall score of 8 out of 10 this theme features a fully responsive and adaptive
grid layout which is quite unique. Perfect for a lifestyle, magazine, or viral
news style blog. These types of blogs can often seem tacky,
however, Super Grid brings some style to the genre. There aren’t many layout options, but it
does what it’s meant to do, and as far as Grid layouts go, this one is a winner. E-commerce is available and the shopping experience
is straightforward. It offers plenty of space for advertising
and has a unique tag cloud feature. It also adapts well to mobile screens. With a minimal design that really brings your
content into focus, there is nothing to complain about – Its simplistic nature also makes
it the fastest blog theme on this list. The next WordPress theme is It’s a Wrap This is a unique theme, scoring an 8 out of
10 This one is for is for all the vloggers out
there. Tesla themes dramatic and visually appealing
style seems to suit the entertainment industry perfectly. Wrap, or it’s a wrap would be an ideal blog
theme for a vlogger, or someone focusing on the movie or entertainment industry. This theme features a number of unique layouts,
all of which are straight to the point, yet flexible and deal well with video elements
and images. There is also a unique ‘submit your video’
feature, which allows users to submit video content. Because they kept it simple the theme responds
well on other displays to provide a consistent user experience. The next WordPress theme is The Motion We graded this theme 8 out of 10 overall. As you can see this theme scored reasonably
well across all categories, our only concern is that the design isn’t overly inspiring. It’s very square and to the point, however,
we realize that may suit certain types of blogs and design styles. It’s one of the few blogs on this list dedicated
to video content and has some specific features, for example, a YouTube-ish widget next to
videos which highlights related videos and/or the next videos in the series, which is great
if you’re in the vlogging, education, or digital product space. It also supports WooCommerce, to easily integrate
an online store. The next WordPress theme is MyBlog Which scored an 8 out of 10. MyBlog is lightning fast and is in the top
3 for page speed. It does depend slightly on which design you
choose, for example, the gaming skin understandably performs a little worse. All of the styles feel like the use of color
and typography needs an update and some refinement. Other than that though, the navigation, layout
options, and mobile responsiveness all tick the box. This theme includes eCommerce functionality
and comes with a number of pre-defined layouts to get up and running quickly. The next WordPress theme is Relive This theme earned an overall grade of 8 out
of 10 The look of this theme is nothing short of
spectacular. It’s one of the few themes that has very
little white space, but manages to pull it off! As you can expect with all the imagery, it’s
a little slower than some of its counterparts. Relive however, would make an excellent travel
and experience blog. It doesn’t have much in terms of functionality,
and it’s not really geared towards bloggers that want to run an online shop. However, for any of the thrill seekers, adventurers,
and explorers out there, this theme is worth a look. The only small fault with the design is that
some links aren’t clickable for the whole area, only the text is clickable, which is
an easy fix if you know a little CSS. We are putting together a CSS fundamentals
course for WordPress at the moment, which could help skill you up in this space. To learn more head to courses.ohklyn.com and
sign up to our newsletter to be notified and receive a discount. The next WordPress theme is BuzzBlog, which
scored 7 out of 10 overall What we like about this theme is that it’s
one of the only themes on this list with zoomable images! It’s another theme that leans towards that
hipster vibe, and features a one-click demo content import tool which is an awesome feature. It’s a very cool theme, but feels a little
washed out. We don’t love the textured backgrounds but
they do add a little character, similarly the choice of gray doesn’t quite feel right,
however, the good news is, this can be easily customized. BuzzBlog gets points for having e-commerce
support, a bunch of features, and some pretty hover animations. The next WordPress theme is Brixton We gave this theme a 7 out of 10. This theme has a very modern / trendy vibe
that would be a perfect match for a fashion, beauty, lifestyle, high-end travel, or shopping
blog. It has a real elegance and sophistication
to it, with its minimalistic design and nice use of CSS animation and general styling. What lets this theme down is its page speed,
and lack of features, namely eCommerce support. Other than that though, it’s an attractive
and eclectic theme with a number of layout options, widgets, and styles to choose from. The next WordPress theme is The Essence With a score of 7 out of 10, This theme had
the potential to be great, but unfortunately settled for good. With an elegant and feminine design this theme
does a lot of things right, and looks great on all devices. The navigation is solid and has some unique
elements. The theme also comes with a number of custom
widgets and features, which helps to really customize your blog. However, the lack of hover states on links,
buttons, and images leave you feeling a little emotionally detached. These things can easily be fixed with some
custom CSS, but they really should have thought about this. The lack of eCommerce integration may present
a challenge for some, although if you can get over this, and happen to know a little
CSS, then this theme could be the one. The next WordPress theme is Divi Divi is lower down on the list than it actually
deserves with a score of 7 out of 10. It could potentially be a very good blogging
WordPress theme, in fact it’s the theme we’re using on the OHKLYN blog at the moment. The keyword however, is potentially. Divi is a multi-purpose theme, and is really
suited more towards building websites, rather than stand-alone blogs. That being said, Divi is one of the most popular
themes around, and has a huge community of followers and contributors, which means you
get access to support forums, layouts and designs, and tutorials. One of the best things about Divi is it’s
intuitive page builder and mobile responsiveness. The next WordPress theme is BloggingBox We gave this theme an overall score of 7 out
of 10 This theme comes with a number of layout options
tailored towards a news, travel, or fitness oriented blog. BloggingBox is a more informal and light-hearted
blogging theme, however the design feels a little heavier compared to other options on
this list, which we recognize may suit certain users. One thing we really like about this theme
is that it integrates with, and allows you to share content on almost any platform you
can think of, even GitHub! This theme responds well on mobile, and is
compatible with WooCommerce, which adds to its appeal. The next WordPress theme is Rosemary This theme earned an overall rating of 7 out
of 10 It’s mobile responsiveness is by far this
theme’s best attribute. Like The Voux, its mobile experience is even
better than the desktop version. Unlike The Voux however, it doesn’t have
that many features and it doesn’t have any e-commerce support. Other than that, it’s a relatively easy-to-use
theme with a clean and simple design. The text in paragraphs feels a little too
small, which is an easy fix in the customizer settings. There is also very little in the way of animations,
which makes it feel a little too static. Once again though, if you know a little CSS,
this is an easy fix. The next WordPress theme is ViralPro This theme is a little different and earnt
a 7 out of 10. It is geared exclusively towards Viral news
blogs. If you don’t run this kind of blog, then
we’ll cover off on this one quickly! For what it does, it does well. This theme is not meant to be attractive,
but to get people to click and read articles. It scores reasonable well for speed, ease
of use, mobile experience, and functionality and includes a number of features and widgets
tailored to this niche. It doesn’t have eCommerce functionality
built in, and isn’t likely to win any design awards, but it is effective. Rounding out the top 20 is Modern Studio Pro,
with an overall score of 7 out of 10 StudioPress create beautiful themes and this
one is no exception. They are synonymous with clean and modern
design. The biggest issue with Modern Studio Pro,
despite it being a bit of a lightweight in terms of features (for example, no eCommerce
support), is that it’s ranked towards the bottom of the list in terms of page speed. Other than that flaw, it’s easy-to-use,
has tasteful navigation, and looks great on all devices. It embraces the minimalist approach, with
great use of white space, typefaces, and hover states. Everything feels sophisticated and considered. Alright, well that completes our review of
the 20 best WordPress Blog Themes for 2017 & 2018. Hopefully, you found something you like – or
will discover something in the process of exploring some of the theme providers covered
in this video. Remember you can find the links to all of
the themes covered in this video in the description box below, or on the OHKLYN blog at ohklyn
o-h-k-l-y-n .com. We’ll also provide a list of our preferred
WordPress theme providers, so that you can explore their themes further, and find the
right theme for you. If you liked this video, hit the like button,
and to learn more about blogging, WordPress, or digital marketing remember to subscribe
to our YouTube channel and sign up for our newsletter at OHKLYN o-h-k-l-y-n .com – and
until next time, happy blogging.

Facts: The Portuguese Man of War

Facts: The Portuguese Man of War


The Portuguese man of war is a siphonophore
that can be found floating on the surface of the ocean in tropical and sub-tropical
areas around the world. A siphonophore is not a true jellyfish or
even a single organism. Each siphonophore is actually a colony of
organisms called polyps or zooids that work together to survive. These polyps are so specialized that they
cannot live without each other. The uppermost polyp is a gas filled float
called a pneumatophore, that sits above the water. The other polyps are digestive polyps called
gastrozooids, defensive tentacles called dactylozooids, or reproductive polyps called gonozooids. The tentacles average about 30ft long, but they
can be over 100 ft (30 m) long. The tentacles are covered with stinging cells
called nemotocysts that help the siphonophores capture food as they drift. The stinging cells have tiny, coiled stinging
barbs that shoot out and inject venom whenever they are disturbed. Since these colonial organisms cannot propel
themselves, they rely on the winds and currents to move them through the open ocean. The position of the sail on their float determines
what direction the wind blows them. They sometimes drift in swarms of over 1000. They feed on organisms like small fish and
plankton that are paralyzed by their tentacles. Once prey is caught, the tentacles retract
and draw the prey up to their digestive polyps. Enzymes are secreted that digest the prey. A Portuguese man of war still has predators
like sea turtles and ocean sunfish. The sting of a Portuguese man of war causes
excruciating pain in humans, but it very rarely fatal. They are generally found far out in the ocean,
but they are sometimes washed up on beaches in swarms when there are high winds. A washed-up man of war can still sting. Each man of war is either male or female. They reproduce sexually by broadcast spawning
in large groups. The resulting larvae will each form their
own colony of organisms by asexual budding. For more marine facts, click the SUBSCRIBE
button!!